College of Agriculture and Human Sciences

Purpose and Goal

The College of Agriculture and Human Sciences shall serve to reinforce and strengthen the land grant mission of the University by implementing programs in the agricultural, food, human and natural resource sciences that:

  1. Highlight learning, discovery and engagement;
  2. Focus on matters related to the interactive roles of individuals, families and communities within social, economic, environmental, and global systems; and
  3. Anchor these actions on sound public policy, the best available science, and efficient management.

Specifically, the programs in the College shall provide:

  1. Instructional activities in Agriculture and Dietetics which provide learning opportunities that prepare students to respond effectively to complex social issues relating to the food, agricultural, human and natural resource sciences through the use of innovative strategies in the delivery of classroom, laboratory, and experiential learning activities that prepare graduates for discovery and engagement in a diverse and global labor force and for advanced study in graduate and/or professional schools. These activities are conducted within the structure of the Department of Agriculture, Nutrition and Human Ecology.
  2. Research activities to conduct basic and applied research in the agricultural, food, human and natural resource sciences that generate scientific information and technological developments that respond to the needs of stakeholders. These activities are conducted primarily within the structure of the Cooperative Agricultural Research Center.
  3. Extension activities to deliver research based information and informal educational opportunities focused on identified issues and needs of Texans of diverse ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds giving emphasis to individuals who are historically unserved and underserved. These activities are conducted primarily within the structure of the Cooperative Extension Program.
  4. International activities that establish sustainable linkages and collaborative relationships of mutual interest with global partners and sponsors to develop human capital and natural and institutional resources through implementation of the land grant mission functions of teaching/learning, research/discovery, and service/engagement in the agricultural, food, human and natural resource sciences. These activities are conducted primarily within the structure of the Institute for International Agribusiness Studies.

Comprehensively, through involvement in professional and scientific activities, the College shall enhance the food, agricultural, and human sciences and strive to improve the quality of life for the residents of Texas, the nation and the world.

Instructional Organization

Program Degree Offered
AgricultureBSAG
Human Nutrition and FoodBSDIET
Human SciencesMS

Academic Standards and Progress

Students enrolled in a degree program in the College of Agriculture and Human Sciences are required to fulfill the university requirements for successful academic progress toward graduation. In addition, students are expected to:

Earn an overall grade point average of 2.50 in courses required for the degree beyond the University core, but which are not offered by programs within the College.

Students who wish to transfer from other colleges and universities to the College must have a minimum grade point average of 2.50 in transfer credits accepted by the respective program for unconditional admission, in addition to satisfying the general requirements specified in this catalog.

Students within the university who wish to transfer to the College must have a minimum grade point average of 2.25 in transfer credits accepted by the respective Program for unconditional admission.

Honor Societies and Clubs

Student organizations in the College are linked to national professional organizations and serve as vehicles to assist each student with professional development.

All Majors

Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences (MANRRS) is a national society that promotes and fosters the involvement of minorities in agriculture and related sciences. Chapters established at various colleges and universities are designed to develop a partnership between minority students in agriculture and natural resources and professionals from academic institutions, government agencies and industry by promoting professional development, networking, and career placement in a nurturing environment. Membership is open to people of all racial and ethnic backgrounds who support the objective of full ethnic group participation and achievement in agricultural and related science careers.

Agriculture

The Agricultural Economics Club is affiliated with the American Agricultural Economics Association and with the Southern Agricultural Economics Association. It encourages the professional growth and development of students majoring in agricultural economics. Membership is open to all agricultural economics majors.

Alpha Tau Alpha (ATA) is a national professional honorary agricultural educational fraternity. Membership is open to all Agriculture majors and minors who are sophomores or above and who satisfy the criteria as outlined in the constitution. The fraternity exists to develop a professional spirit in the teaching of agricultural science and technology, to assist in preparing teachers of agricultural science to become leaders in their communities, and to foster a fraternal spirit among students in the food and agricultural sciences.

The American Society of Animal Science encourages the professional growth and development of students majoring in animal science. Students participate in regional and national activities through chapter activities. Membership is open to all students majoring in animal science.

The Rodeo Club is affiliated with the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association (NIRA). The rodeo team participates in rodeos sponsored by the Southern Region of the NIRA. At least 20 rodeos are sponsored by the Southern Region during the academic school year.

The Soil Conservation Society of America and the American Society of Agronomy are open to all students in agronomy. These societies provide students with the opportunity to become a part of the national conservation movement; to share information, fellowship, ideas, and experiences through the local, state, and national chapters; and to encourage students to demonstrate leadership and to participate in the activities of the local, state, and national organizations.

Family and Community Services

The Kappa Beta Epsilon Chapter of Kappa Omicron Nu, National Home Economics Honor Society, was installed on the campus in 1963 as the Beta Epsilon Chapter of Kappa Omicron Phi. Kappa Omicron Nu was formed during 1989-90 through the merger of two National Home Economics Honor Societies, Omicron Nu and Kappa Omicron Phi. Students majoring or minoring in family and community services or human nutrition and food are eligible for membership upon satisfying specific membership criteria as outlined by the constitution of the organization.

The programs also encourage student participation in specialized student member affiliates of professional organizations supported by the major area. Students interested in gaining membership in these specialty organizations should consult with the major advisor.

Nutrition

The Student Association of Nutrition and Dietetics (SAND) gives the student an opportunity to explore career opportunities in the field of nutrition and dietetics. Students interact with peers and faculty outside the classroom and have the opportunity to be actively involved with other local and state chapters.

Purpose and Goals

The College of Agriculture and Human Sciences shall serve to reinforce and strengthen the land grant mission of the University by implementing programs in the agricultural, food, human and natural resource sciences that 1) highlight learning, discovery and engagement; 2) focus on matters related to the interactive roles of individuals, families and communities within social, economic, environmental, and global systems; and 3) anchor these actions on sound public policy, the best available science, and efficient management.

Specifically, the programs in the College shall provide:

  1. Instructional activities in Agriculture, Dietetics, and in Human Sciences which provide learning opportunities that prepare students to respond effectively to complex social issues relating to the food, agricultural, human and natural resource sciences through the use of innovative strategies in the delivery of classroom, laboratory, and experiential learning activities that prepare graduates for discovery and engagement in a diverse and global labor force and for advanced study in graduate and/or professional schools. These activities are conducted within the structure of the Department of Agriculture, Nutrition and Human Ecology.
     
  2. Research activities to conduct basic and applied research in the agricultural, food, human and natural resource sciences that generate scientific information and technological developments that respond to the needs of stakeholders. These activities are conducted primarily within the structure of the Cooperative Agricultural Research Center.
     
  3. Extension activities to deliver research based information and informal educational opportunities focused on identified issues and needs of Texans of diverse ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds giving emphasis to individuals that are historically unserved and underserved. These activities are conducted primarily within the structure of the Cooperative Extension Program.
     
  4. International activities that establish sustainable linkages and collaborative relationships of mutual interest with global partners and sponsors to develop human capital and natural and institutional resources through implementation of the land grant mission functions of teaching/learning, research/discovery, and service/engagement in the agricultural, food, human and natural resource sciences. These activities are conducted primarily within the structure of the Institute for International Agribusiness Studies.

The graduate programs emphasize the preparation of students for teaching, research and public service in colleges and universities, in social and public service agencies, and/or in managerial positions in business, industry or government. The curriculum offers opportunities for students to tailor the program to meet individual needs and prepares graduates to work with clientele in a professional capacity as agents of change. The specific goals of the program provide opportunities for enhanced professional competency development and the development of an academic and stylistic model for additional graduate study in a variety of academic specialties.

Instructional Organization

The College of Agriculture and Human Sciences offers the following graduate degree programs:

Program Degree Offered
Human Sciences Option
Marriage and Family StudiesM.S., Human Sciences


The Human Sciences Program includes a degree option in Marriage and Family Studies with a focus on preparation of the graduate for licensure application in Marriage and Family Therapy and/or Licensed Professional Counselor .

Graduate courses offered by the Department may be utilized to support graduate majors in Counseling, Sociology, Psychology, Criminal Justice, Education and related disciplines. Students seeking specialization in these areas should consult the Advisor in the major field of study for appropriate application of coursework.

Admission Requirements

Students desiring to major in graduate programs in the College of Agriculture and Human Sciences must:

  1. Present undergraduate subject matter credits consistent with or closely aligned with the academic specialties offered from an accredited college of university.
  2. Submit a biographical sketch and professional statement of intent for professional practice.
  3. Meet all requirements as outlined by the graduate school for a degree status student or the minimum criteria for provisional graduate status. Provisional status must be removed within the first twelve months of initial enrollment.

Courses

AGHR 1303 Land Grant System & Food Secur: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed to educate students about the land grant mission, created by the Morrill Act passed by Congress in 1862 and 1890. Areas related to science technology in Global Food Security and Sustainable Food program will be emphasized. Students will actively participate in peer workshops to demonstrate critical thinking skills gained through programs.

AGHR 1313 Agricultural Science and Technology: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to professions in agricultural sciences and technology. Importance of agriculture in the state, nation and world. Review of research developments; explorations of career and other opportunities and development of human resource skills needed in agriculture.

AGHR 3323 Program Planning: 3 semester hours.

The application of strategies appropriate for delivering agriculture and human resource concepts to varied audiences. This includes the use of media, materials and supplies; procedures for management, motivation and evaluation.
Prerequisites: AGHR 1313.

AGHR 3793 Cooperative Occupational Experience in Agriculture: 3 semester hours.

Pre-baccalaureate work experience in the food and agriculture sciences commensurate with the student's academic emphasis. Written report of activities consistent with program guidelines upon completion of experience. A minimum of 100 clock hours of supervised work activities is required.

AGHR 3996 Cooperative Occupational Experience in Agriculture: 6 semester hours.

Pre-baccalaureate work experience in the food and agricultural sciences commensurate with the student's academic emphasis. Written report of activities consistent with program guidelines upon completion of experience. A minimum of 200 clock hours of supervised work activities are required.

AGHR 4413 Special Topics: 3 semester hours.

Study of a problem affecting some aspect of the food and agricultural science industry. Reports, discussion and major paper required. Repeatable for up to 6 semester credit hours.

AGHR 4992 Independent Study: 2 semester hours.

Readings, research and/or field work on selected topics. Prerequisite: Advisor consent.

AGHR 4993 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research and/or field work on selected topics. Prerequisite: Advisor consent.

AGHR 5303 Research: 3 semester hours.

Conduct data collection, manuscript preparation, and presentation of research. Registration with permission of the graduate advisor/research chair. Student may enroll in this course twice for a total of 6 semester credit hours.

AGHR 5323 Workshop in Food and Agricultural Sciences: 3 semester hours.

Study of selected problems and issues in the food and agricultural sciences with emphasis on teacher and/or extension education programs. Analysis of contemporary educational needs. Selection and organization of course/program content, criteria and procedures for evaluation.

AGHR 5333 Administration and Supervision of Agriculture and Human Resources: 3 semester hours.

Development, organization, administration, and supervision of vocational agricultural education at the local, state, and national levels.

AGHR 5343 Youth Leadership Development: 3 semester hours.

Procedures of organizing and conducting agricultural programs and activities for developing leadership skills in youth.

AGHR 5353 Technological Change: 3 semester hours.

A study of advanced technological changes affecting the food and agricultural economy. Cultural and socioeconomic forces retarding and/or accelerating change. Processes of planning and implementing change.

AGHR 5373 Seminar: 3 semester hours.

Study of current legislative and research developments in the food and agricultural sciences. Readings, discussions and written reports focusing on application of developments in professional practice.

AGHR 5813 Vocational Guidance and Counseling: 3 semester hours.

Study of educational and occupational opportunities to assist youth in making career choices. Special attention is given to rural and limited resource youth. Techniques of individual and group counseling.

AGHR 5833 Organization and Administration of Agricultural Extension Programs: 3 semester hours.

Study of extension programming in agriculture and human sciences. Principles of developing objectives and program planning; coordination and procedures of teaching and evaluating. One week observation with a County Extension Agent required.

AGHR 5991 Independent Study: 1 semester hour.

Readings, research, and/or field placement focusing on pre-selected issues in the food and agricultural sciences.

AGHR 5992 Independent Study: 2 semester hours.

Readings, research, and/or field placement focusing on pre-selected issues in the food and agricultural sciences.

AGHR 5993 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research, and/or field placement focusing on pre-selected issues in the food and agricultural sciences.