Department of Accounting, Finance and Management Information Systems

Purpose and Goals

The Accounting program is designed to offer high-quality, comprehensive accounting education which prepares students for immediate employment in the private and public sectors as well as for graduate or professional education. Students are provided an accounting curriculum which offers general business education in a liberal arts setting that encourages logical, analytical and creative strategic thinking and ethical conduct that fosters positive competition to develop confident, global-minded individuals who possess the requisite knowledge and skills to become leaders in their organizations. The program supports a learning environment based on open communication and interaction among faculty, students and employers and provides structured practical experience through student internships.

The Finance program is designed to prepare students for professional careers in the private and public sectors, and to prepare them to pursue graduate studies in finance or related disciplines. It seeks to provide students with a comprehensive and contemporary education in financial concepts and practices with sufficient flexibility to respond to dynamic national and global environments. In addition, the program fosters the development of innovative skills among its graduates and focuses on ethical conduct and professionalism in the work environment.

The Management Information Systems (MIS) program is designed to prepare students to design, develop, operate, and manage computer software systems and computer-based management information systems. Program content is broad enough to enable students to integrate concepts and apply knowledge and tools of advanced information technology to practical applications in accounting, finance, and operations management. Graduates of the program are competent and capable of working with current and future information systems technology and knowledgeable of business computer languages.

The program is based on a broad liberal arts education, followed by upper-level study in computer-based information systems. In order to achieve the goal of developing students as confident and well-rounded, the program provides an intense learning environment based on student, faculty, and corporate interaction.

Special Emphasis Options

Certified Public Accountant

The Texas Public Accountancy Act of 1991 requires 150 hours of academic credits as a prerequisite to register and sit for the 1997 Uniform Certified Public Accountancy (CPA) Examination. Completing an MS in Accounting (MSA) degree is a good way to earn additional credit hours beyond the bachelor's degree.  Students desiring a career as a CPA should consider admission to the MSA (or MBA) program in order to be eligible for the CPA examination (150 hours). For additional information on the MSA (or MBA) program, consult the Graduate Catalog.

4+1 Program in Accounting

The 4+1 program is designed to help accounting students to seamlessly move into the Masters of Science program in Accounting (MSA) upon completion of the Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) program in accounting. Students may be allowed to double count two courses (6 sch) toward meeting the degree requirements of both programs (BBA and MSA). Besides enhancement of knowledge in the accounting discipline, the program will help students academically prepare for the CPA exam. Students in the program may be eligible for the Fifth-Year Accounting Student Scholarship Program available through the Texas State Board of Public Accountancy.  For additional information, see the Graduate Programs in Business section of the University catalog.

Honor Societies and Student Organizations

Students are encouraged to participate in clubs and honor societies in their respective disciplines. These organizations provide valuable experience and help develop leadership skills.

In addition to the honor societies, clubs, and service organizations listed in the College of Business section, accounting majors are encouraged to seek membership in the National Association of Black Accountants (NABA). A national organization for accountants and accounting students, NABA encourages and helps students enter the accounting profession, promotes professional development in accounting, and provides assistance in developing accounting education for members of minority groups. Membership is open to students majoring in accounting and others who subscribe to the club mission.

Association for Information Technology Professionals (AITP) local chapter, an organization for information systems students, conducts seminars, tutorials, and field trips to promote individual and group exposure to advanced information technology theory, tools and methods. Membership is open to all majors.

Students may also participate in the Prairie View Finance Association (PVFA), an organization for finance students, which promotes the following goals:

  1. Stimulation of the students’ interests in the field of finance.
  2. Achievement of excellence among students in the department.
  3. Application of academic knowledge to practical situations.
  4. Promotion of ethical principles, standards, financial literacy and professionalism emphasizes finance as practitioners in the industry.

Departmental requirements

Business students will be allowed to count a maximum of 6 SCH from their major area courses towards the minor requirements. Any additional courses which are common between the major area of study and the minor area would have to be made up by additional courses in the minor area. Consult department head for details.

All electives must be at the junior/senior level. 

Non-Business students are required to maintain a cumulative GPA of a 2.0 or higher for graduation; they can have only one “D” in the minor area courses.

Students must have a cumulative GPA of 2.3 or higher in order to graduate with a Bachelor of Business Administration degree in this department.

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting Degree Requirements

Core Curriculum 142
College of Business students must complete PSYC 1113 to satisfy the University core social and behavioral science requirements. They must also complete FINA 2103 and MISY 1013 to satisfy the University core professional development areas one and two respectively.
General Education Supplement for Accounting Majors (21 sch)
MATH 1153Finite Mathematics 23
ECON 2113Principles of Microeconomics3
ECON 2123Principles of Macroeconomics3
ECON Elective 33
MGMT 1163Quantitative Business Anaysis3
MGMT 2000Prof Development for Business0
MGMT 3013Business Statistics3
ACCT 3243Ethics for Accountants3
College Requirements (33 sch)
ACCT 2113Financial Accounting3
ACCT 2123Managerial Accounting3
BCOM 3303Business Communication3
BLAW 2203Legal Environment of Business3
FINA 3103Principles of Finance3
MISY 2013Fundamentals of MIS with SAP3
MGMT 1013Introduction to Business3
MGMT 3103Principles of Management3
MGMT 4000Professional Development For Business II0
MGMT 4303Strategic Management and Business Policy3
MGMT 4333Production and Operations Management3
MRKT 3103Principles of Marketing3
Major Area Requirements (30 sch)
ACCT 3213Intermediate Accounting I3
ACCT 3223Intermediate Accounting II3
ACCT 3313Cost Accounting3
ACCT 3333Federal Income Tax I3
ACCT 4213Advanced Accounting3
ACCT 4223Auditing3
ACCT 4313Accounting Information Systems3
BLAW 2213Business Law3
ACCT Electives 36
Total Hours126
1

College of Business students must earn a grade of "C" or better in the following courses: ENGL 1123, ENGL 1133 and MATH 1113.

2

A grade of "C" or higher is required.  Also, a grade of "C" or higher is required in all business courses used to satisfy graduation requirements.

3

Electives must be at the junior/senior level; internship/co-op courses cannot be used as major electives.

Bachelor of Business Administration  in Finance Degree Requirements

Core Curriculum 142
College of Business students must complete PSYC 1113 to satisfy the University core social and behavioral science requirements. They must also complete FINA 2103 and MISY 1013 to satisfy the University core professional development areas one and two respectively.
General Education Supplement for Finance Majors (21 sch)
MATH 1153Finite Mathematics 23
ECON 2113Principles of Microeconomics3
ECON 2123Principles of Macroeconomics3
ECON Elective 33
MGMT 1163Quantitative Business Anaysis3
MGMT 3013Business Statistics3
MGMT 2203Leadership and Ethics3
College Requirements (33 SCH)
ACCT 2113Financial Accounting3
ACCT 2123Managerial Accounting3
BCOM 3303Business Communication3
BLAW 2203Legal Environment of Business3
FINA 3103Principles of Finance3
MISY 2013Fundamentals of MIS with SAP3
MGMT 1013Introduction to Business3
MGMT 2000Prof Development for Business0
MGMT 3103Principles of Management3
MGMT 4000Professional Development For Business II0
MGMT 4303Strategic Management and Business Policy3
MGMT 4333Production and Operations Management3
MRKT 3103Principles of Marketing3
Major Area Requirements (24 sch)
FINA 3333Investment Analysis3
FINA 3383Financial Markets and Institutions3
FINA 4213Managerial Finance3
FINA 4313Investment Management3
Finance Electives 36
ACCT 3213Intermediate Accounting I3
Select one of the following:3
Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis
Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis
Business Elective 23
Total Hours123
1

College of Business students must earn a grade of "C" or better in the following courses: ENGL 1123, ENGL 1133 and MATH 1113.

2

A grade of "C" or higher is required.  Also, a grade of "C" or higher is required in all business courses used to satisfy graduation requirements.

3

Electives must be at the junior/senior level; internship/co-op courses cannot be used as major electives only as business electives with the approval of the department head.

Bachelor of Business Administration in Management Information Systems Degree Requirements

Core Curriculum 142
College of Business students must complete PSYC 1113 to satisfy the University core social and behavioral science requirements. They must also complete FINA 2103 and MISY 1013 to satisfy the University core professional development areas one and two respectively.
General Education Supplement for Management Information Systems Majors (21 sch)
MATH 1153Finite Mathematics 23
ECON 2113Principles of Microeconomics3
ECON 2123Principles of Macroeconomics3
ECON Elective 33
MGMT 1163Quantitative Business Anaysis3
MGMT 3013Business Statistics3
MGMT 2203Leadership and Ethics3
College Requirements (33 sch)
ACCT 2113Financial Accounting3
ACCT 2123Managerial Accounting3
BLAW 2203Legal Environment of Business3
BCOM 3303Business Communication3
FINA 3103Principles of Finance3
MISY 2013Fundamentals of MIS with SAP3
MGMT 1013Introduction to Business3
MGMT 2000Prof Development for Business0
MGMT 3103Principles of Management3
MGMT 4000Professional Development For Business II0
MGMT 4303Strategic Management and Business Policy3
MGMT 4333Production and Operations Management3
MRKT 3103Principles of Marketing3
Major Area Requirements (24 sch)
MISY 2153Object-Oriented Programming Applications in Business3
MISY 3323Networking3
MISY 3413Business Database Applications3
MISY 3423Enterprise Systems Analysis and Design3
MISY 3433JAVA Applications in Business3
MISY 4523Enterprise Strategic IT Management3
Management Information Systems Electives 36
Business Elective 23
Total Hours123
1

College of Business students must earn a grade of "C" or better in the following courses: ENGL 1123, ENGL 1133 and MATH 1113.

2

A grade of "C" or higher is required.  Also, a grade of "C" or higher is required in all business courses used to satisfy graduation requirements.

3

Electives must be at the junior/senior level; internship/co-op courses cannot be used as a major elective, only as a business elective with the approval of the department head.

Minors in the Department of Accounting, Finance and Management Information Systems

Business students will be allowed to count a maximum of 6 SCH from their major area courses towards the minor requirements. Any additional courses which are common between the major area of study and the minor area would have to be made up by additional courses in the minor area. Consult department head for details.

Non-Business students are required to maintain a cumulative GPA of a 2.0 or higher for graduation; they can have only one “D” in the minor area courses.

Requirements for a Minor in Accounting

ACCT 2113Financial Accounting3
ACCT 2123Managerial Accounting3
ACCT 3213Intermediate Accounting I3
ACCT 3313Cost Accounting3
ACCT 4313Accounting Information Systems3
ACCT Elective (3000 or 4000 level)3
FINA 3103Principles of Finance3
Total Hours21

Requirements for a Minor in Finance

ACCT 2113Financial Accounting3
ACCT 2123Managerial Accounting3
FINA 3103Principles of Finance3
FINA 3333Investment Analysis3
FINA 3383Financial Markets and Institutions3
FINA 4213Managerial Finance3
Finance Elective (3000 or 4000 level; internship/co-op cannot be used))3
Total Hours21

Requirements for a Minor in Personal Financial Planning

ACCT 3333Federal Income Tax I3
FINA 3013Fundamentals of Financial Planning3
FINA 3023Principles of Insurance3
FINA 3333Investment Analysis3
FINA 4113Retirement Planning and Employee Benefits3
FINA 4123Estate Planning3
Total Hours18

Requirements for a Minor in Management Information Systems

MISY 2013Fundamentals of MIS with SAP3
MISY 2153Object-Oriented Programming Applications in Business3
MISY 3323Networking3
MISY 3413Business Database Applications3
MISY 3423Enterprise Systems Analysis and Design3
MIS Elective (3000 or 4000 level)3
Total Hours18

Requirements for a Minor in Real Estate

FINA 2103Personal Financial Management and Planning3
FINA 3113Real Estate Principles3
FINA 3223Real Estate Finance3
FINA 3253Real Estate Investments3
BLAW 2203Legal Environment of Business3
BLAW 2243Law of Agency3
Total Hours18

4+1 Program in Accounting

The 4+1 program in Accounting is designed to help accounting students move seamlessly into the Master of Science in Accounting (MSA) program upon completion of the Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) program in accounting. Students will be allowed to double count two courses (6 sch) toward the degree requirements of both programs (BBA and MSA). Besides enhancement of knowledge in the accounting discipline, the program will help students earn additional academic coursework and hours needed to sit for the CPA exam. Students in the program may be eligible for the Fifth Year Accounting Student Scholarship.

Admission

Students may apply for admission into the 4+1 program after completion of their sophomore year of the BBA program. Admission will be based on consideration of multiple factors, such as the grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.75 in the major area and other relevant evidence of academic achievement and leadership ability.  Students must be fully admitted to the graduate school to satisfy the degree requirements for the MS in Accounting. 

Although students cannot apply for admission into the 4+1 program prior to their sophomore year of the BBA program, it is strongly advised that interested students contact the department head or the 4+1 program coordinator regarding interest in the program. A suggested degree plan follows this section.

Completion of Two Degrees

Upon successful completion of the 4+1 program, students would be awarded the BBA in Accounting and MS in Accounting degrees.

Program Requirements

Since the 4+1 program essentially combines the BBA in Accounting and the MS in Accounting programs, the requirements for the combined program would be the same as those of the two separate programs together. These requirements are stated below.

For the BBA in accounting degree, requirements are:

University Core Curriculum42
General Education Supplement for Accounting Majors21
College of Business Requirements33
Major Area Requirements30
Total Hours126

For the MS in Accounting (MSA) degree program, requirements are:

Required Courses21
Elective Courses9
Total Hours30

Total 4+1 Program Requirements - 156 SCH

A suggested degree plan for the 4+1 program is given below. Freshmen and sophomore level students follow the degree plan for the Bachelor of Business Administration program in Accounting provided earlier.

Junior Year - First Semester
ACCT 3213Intermediate Accounting I3
ACCT 3313Cost Accounting3
ACCT 3333Federal Income Tax I3
MGMT 3013Business Statistics3
MGMT 3103Principles of Management3
MISY 2013Fundamentals of MIS with SAP3
Junior Year - Second Semester
ACCT 3223Intermediate Accounting II3
ACCT 3243Ethics for Accountants3
BLAW 2213Business Law3
FINA 3103Principles of Finance3
MRKT 3103Principles of Marketing3
Senior Year - First Semester
ACCT 4213Advanced Accounting3
ACCT 4223Auditing3
ACCT 4313Accounting Information Systems3
MGMT 4333Production and Operations Management3
MSA Accounting Course*
Language, Philosophy and Culture3
Senior Year - Second Semester
BCOM 3303Business Communication (or BCOM 5203 Managerial Communication*)3
MGMT 4303Strategic Management and Business Policy3
Economics Elective (or a grad course in economics)*3
MSA Accounting Course*3
Graduate - Summer
ACCT 5143Accounting Theory3
ACCT 5133Accounting for Managerial Decision Making3
MSA Elective3
Graduate - First Semester
ACCT 5113Advanced Auditing3
BCOM 5203Managerial Communication3
ACCT 5123Accounting Information Systems & Controls3
Graduate - Second Semester
ACCT 5163Law & Ethics for Accountants3
ACCT 5153Seminar on Tax Consulting, Planning and Research3
MSA Elective3
Total Hours87

 *Two graduate courses can be counted for credit toward BBA and MSA degrees. Consult the 4+1 program coordinator or department head for details.

Accounting for Executives Courses

EACC 5213 Accounting for Executives: 3 semester hours.

Managerial accounting within a global environment; covers advanced accounting tools, concepts, and techniques for decision making in a global environment.

Accounting Courses

ACCT 2110 Financial Accounting Laboratory: 0 semester hours.

Practical applications of financial accounting concepts and tools; problem solving exercises.
Co-requisite: ACCT 2113.

ACCT 2113 Financial Accounting: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the communication of relevant financial information to investors, creditors, and analysts with an emphasis on the accounting information cycle and the preparation of the three major financial statements: the balance sheet, the statement of income and retained earnings, and the statement of cash flows.

ACCT 2123 Managerial Accounting: 3 semester hours.

Instruction in the managerial decision-making functions using accounting information. Review of internal accounting information systems for planning, monitoring, and decision making with an emphasis on manufacturing cost, budgeting, product pricing, and CVP relationships.
Prerequisites: ACCT 2113.

ACCT 3213 Intermediate Accounting I: 3 semester hours.

The study of accounting principles and the preparation of financial statements with an emphasis on accounting theory, current and non-current assets, revenues and expenses and the time value of money.
Prerequisites: ACCT 2123.

ACCT 3223 Intermediate Accounting II: 3 semester hours.

A continuation of ACCT 3213 with an emphasis on accounting principles and financial statement preparation in the areas: investments, current and long-term liabilities, stockholders' equity, income taxes, leases, accounting changes, pensions, cash flow statements, earnings per share, and financial statement analysis.
Prerequisites: ACCT 3213.

ACCT 3243 Ethics for Accountants: 3 semester hours.

A study of the legal, regulatory and ethical issues of business with special emphasis pertaining to accounting.
Prerequisites: ACCT 2123.

ACCT 3313 Cost Accounting: 3 semester hours.

The fundamental costs of a manufacturing concern such as raw materials, labor cost, and overhead and the preparation of internal reports for managerial decisions in the areas: planning, control and budgets.
Prerequisites: ACCT 2123.

ACCT 3333 Federal Income Tax I: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the theory and fundamentals of federal income tax as applied to individuals, with an emphasis on individuals involved in business activities or organizations. Includes an introduction to tax research and professional communication of results.
Prerequisites: ACCT 2123.

ACCT 3343 Federal Income Tax II: 3 semester hours.

Covers federal income tax codes as they apply to proprietorships, partnerships and corporations. Also includes tax research.
Prerequisites: ACCT 3333.

ACCT 3393 Accounting Internship I: 3 semester hours.

Supervised full-time, off-campus training at accounting firms, private and public business organizations, governmental agencies, and not-for-profit organizations that requires individual conferences with a faculty member, performance evaluations from the work place, and written reports. The duration of the program will be one regular semester or two consecutive summer terms.
Prerequisites: ACCT 3213.

ACCT 3493 Accounting Internship II: 3 semester hours.

Supervised full-time, off-campus training at accounting firms, private and public business organizations, governmental agencies, and not-for-profit organizations that requires individual conferences with a faculty member, performance evaluations from the work place, and written reports. The duration of the program is one regular semester or two consecutive summer terms.
Prerequisites: ACCT 3213 and ACCT 3313.

ACCT 4133 International Accounting: 3 semester hours.

The course is designed to facilitate an understanding of the fundamental principles and practices of international accounting; includes an analysis of how different social, political, and economic backgrounds influence and interact with accounting, reporting and evaluation processes.
Prerequisites: ACCT 3213.

ACCT 4213 Advanced Accounting: 3 semester hours.

Study of accounting standards and procedures relative to business combinations, consolidated financial statements, foreign currency transactions, translation of foreign entity statements, segment and interim reporting, SEC reporting, and partnership operations.
Prerequisites: ACCT 3223.

ACCT 4223 Auditing: 3 semester hours.

The study of auditing concepts and procedures in the areas: auditing standards, internal control, professional ethics and responsibilities, audit evidence, audit documentation, and audit reports.
Prerequisites: ACCT 3223.

ACCT 4253 Oil & Gas Accounting: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to oil and gas accounting with emphasis on accounting for costs incurred in the acquisition, exploration, development, and production of oil and natural gas using full cost accounting methods; also covers joint interest accounting, gas pipeline accounting, required disclosures for oil and gas activities, and analysis of oil and gas companies; financial statements.
Prerequisites: ACCT 3213.

ACCT 4313 Accounting Information Systems: 3 semester hours.

Study of overall data flow systems emphasizing financial data and computerized systems of accounting. Covers flow and logic concepts and development of meaningful control concepts and data reporting techniques.
Prerequisites: ACCT 2123 and MISY 2013.

ACCT 4323 Fund Accounting: 3 semester hours.

Features of budgetary and fund accounting as applied to not-for-profit organizations such as colleges, universities and governmental units.
Prerequisites: ACCT 3223.

ACCT 4343 Financial Statement Analysis: 3 semester hours.

A study of financial statements in a variety of firm valuation contexts. The course provides various tools for evaluating a firm's accounting and financial performance, the concept of earnings quality, and other related issues.
Prerequisites: (ACCT 3213 and FINA 3103).

ACCT 4993 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Reading, research, and/or field work on selected topics. Prerequisite: Junior/senior classification and consent of instructor and department head.

ACCT 5003 Concepts of Accounting: 3 semester hours.

The review of basic accounting concepts and principles with an emphasis on the accounting cycle, financial statement preparation, and their applications in making managerial decisions in the areas of cost-volume-profit analysis, inventory management, and comparative cost allocation systems.

ACCT 5103 Managerial Accounting: 3 semester hours.

The interpretation and use of accounting data for management purposes in the areas of cost accounting, budgets, standards, production costing, distribution costing, and special analyses.
Prerequisites: ACCT 5003.

ACCT 5113 Advanced Auditing: 3 semester hours.

An advanced study of the practices and principles that guide the auditing environment. Specialty topics will be introduced as well as current readings in auditing literature.
Prerequisites: ACCT 4223.

ACCT 5123 Accounting Information Systems & Controls: 3 semester hours.

A study of the analysis, design, installation, and operations of an accounting information system. Emphasis will be placed on system design and acquisition.
Prerequisites: ACCT 5003.

ACCT 5133 Accounting for Managerial Decision Making: 3 semester hours.

A study of the preparation of internal reports for decision making, planning and control. Additional areas of study include cost determination, budgeting, and quantitative techniques.
Prerequisites: ACCT 5003.

ACCT 5143 Accounting Theory: 3 semester hours.

Development of the theory of accounting with particular emphasis on concepts, income measurement, valuation of assets, valuation and measurement of equities, and the application of accounting theory to contemporary problems.
Prerequisites: ACCT 3213.

ACCT 5153 Seminar on Tax Consulting, Planning and Research: 3 semester hours.

A study of current U.S. tax law with emphasis on the interrelationships between taxation and business and personal financial planning. Tax research, planning, and professional communications are significant components.
Prerequisites: ACCT 3333.

ACCT 5163 Law & Ethics for Accountants: 3 semester hours.

Regulatory, and ethical issues of business. Special emphasis will be placed on issues pertaining to accounting.
Prerequisites: ACCT 5003.

ACCT 5243 International Accounting: 3 semester hours.

Fundamentals, principles and practices of international accounting with emphasis on social, political and economic backgrounds that influence and interact with accounting, reporting and evaluation processes.
Prerequisites: ACCT 5103 or ACCT 5133.

ACCT 5993 Independent Study in Accounting: 3 semester hours.

Supervised readings, research and/or field work on selected topics in accounting. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and approval by the Department Head.

Business Communication Courses

BCOM 3303 Business Communication: 3 semester hours.

Development of best practices in business communication as it relates to the collection, organization, and preparation of business reports. Emphasis will be placed on techniques of collecting, interpreting and presenting information useful in a corporate setting.
Prerequisites: ENGL 1133 and MISY 1013.

BCOM 5203 Managerial Communication: 3 semester hours.

Applications of communications theory, human relations concepts, research methods, and information technology to the internal communication of the manager's work environment. Survey of the organizational communication climate, applications, oral and written reports.
Prerequisites: MGMT 5003.

Economics for Executives Courses

EECO 5103 Economics in the Global Environment: 3 semester hours.

The student will explore the global economy and its potential to affect management decision making. The course will focus on export, import, international trade, international finance, and micro and macro perspectives of the firm relating to the global economy. Highlights include study of the global economy, global market structure and policy, pricing in a global market, and the economics of multinational firms. The graduates will gain an awareness and skills important in negotiating contracts and agreements across national boundaries.

Economics Courses

ECON 2003 Fundamentals of Economics: 3 semester hours.

Designed for non-business majors, this course will synthesize, analyze and evaluate fundamental principles of micro and macroeconomics. Using basic quantitative and graphical tools. More specifically, students will: learn and use economics terminology; build economic models including the business cycle and supply and demand; analyze market structures and performance; evaluate government policies to reduce income in equality and environmental degradation; calculate measures of macroeconomic performance; analyze monetary and fiscal policy; and evaluate the consequences of globalization.

ECON 2113 Principles of Microeconomics: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the principle of microeconomics, which include supply and demand analysis, market equilibrium, production costs faced by firms, the production process, as well as the analysis of market structures, such as perfect competition and the monopoly firm.

ECON 2123 Principles of Macroeconomics: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of the principles and problems of money and banking, national income, public finance, international trade, and economic growth.

ECON 3313 Economic Development: 3 semester hours.

A study of the economic factors affecting economic growth and development. Emphasis is on experience of third world countries.
Prerequisites: ECON 2113 and ECON 2123.

ECON 3323 Public Finance: 3 semester hours.

An examination of the public sector and its contribution to economic welfare. An analysis of alternative forms of taxation and their impact on micro- and macroeconomic decision making.
Prerequisites: ECON 2113 and ECON 2123.

ECON 3343 Economic and Human Resources: 3 semester hours.

Examines population growth, poverty, discrimination, human resource development, and training and education. The course is oriented toward explaining the principles, effects, and policies related to each topic.
Prerequisites: ECON 2113 and ECON 2123.

ECON 4213 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of the principles governing price and output decisions of business firms and the allocation of resources under various market structures.
Prerequisites: ECON 2113.

ECON 4223 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of determinants of the aggregate level of employment, output and income of an economy.
Prerequisites: ECON 2113 and ECON 2123.

ECON 4303 Money and Banking: 3 semester hours.

Money, credit, commercial and central banking, financial intermediaries, treasury operations, monetary theory and policy, and foreign exchange.
Prerequisites: ECON 2123 and ECON 2113.

ECON 4343 International Trade: 3 semester hours.

Principles and practices of foreign trade with special emphasis on international economic relations. Analysis of foreign exchange, balance of payments, foreign investment, tariff history and policy, and currency problems.
Prerequisites: ECON 2113 and ECON 2123.

ECON 4353 Urban Economics: 3 semester hours.

Economic analysis of the major problems facing urban areas. Study of the theory of urban industrial and residential locations, including patterns of urban growth and development.
Prerequisites: ECON 2113 and ECON 2123.

ECON 4373 Economic Research: 3 semester hours.

Introduces the fundamentals of systematic social science research methods commonly used in economics and business disciplines. Includes problems of measurement, study design, sampling, reliability, validity, and ethical considerations.

ECON 4993 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Reading, research, and/or field work on selected topics.

ECON 5003 Concepts of Economic Analysis: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of supply and demand, production and cost functions, price and output determination under different market conditions, and resource pricing. Means of national income and output determination, and issues related to unemployment, inflation, business cycles, monetary and fiscal policies, economic development and growth, and the global linkage of national economies.

ECON 5103 Managerial Economics: 3 semester hours.

Economic theory and tools needed to make sound managerial decisions for optimal outcomes, theoretical and empirical demand functions, theoretical and empirical production and cost functions, profit maximization under different market conditions over time and under uncertainty, game theory, economics of information and government in the market place.
Prerequisites: ECON 5003.

ECON 5313 International Trade and Business: 3 semester hours.

Introduces the principles and practices of international trade emphasizing international business opportunities and challenges. Topics include overview of globalization, basic trade models, tariffs and quotas, labor and environmental controversies in trade, fundamentals of export marketing, economic integration in North America, and international business environment in major U.S. export markets.
Prerequisites: ECON 5003.

Finance for Executives Courses

EFIN 5103 Topics in Corporate Finance: 3 semester hours.

Integration of financial and economic theories to analyze and solve major financial problems facing corporations. Real and simulated cases will be analyzed. Covers topics such as capital budgeting, capital structure, mergers and acquisitions, bankruptcy and reorganization, and risk management.

Finance Courses

FINA 2103 Personal Financial Management and Planning: 3 semester hours.

Covers the basics of personal money management and financial planning which is essential for every citizen in life; topics covered include personal financial planning, savings and debt financing, investment in stocks and bonds, auto and home financing, insurance, retirement and estate planning.

FINA 3013 Fundamentals of Financial Planning: 3 semester hours.

This course prepares students for the business of financial planning. Issues covered include the financial planning process, client interaction, time value of money applications, personal financial statement construction and analysis, cash flow and debt management, ethical issues and considerations, and education planning.
Prerequisites: FINA 2103.

FINA 3023 Principles of Insurance: 3 semester hours.

Applications of fundamental principles of life, property, and casualty insurance, contracts, premiums, legal statutes, risk, and programming.
Prerequisites: ACCT 2123.

FINA 3103 Principles of Finance: 3 semester hours.

Fundamental tools and techniques applicable to financial planning of businesses. Covers valuation of securities, risk-return relationship, capital budgeting, management of current assets and liabilities with extension to international areas.
Prerequisites: ACCT 2123.

FINA 3113 Real Estate Principles: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the study of the economic and legal environment in which real property is transferred and used.
Prerequisites: ACCT 2123 and ECON 2113.

FINA 3223 Real Estate Finance: 3 semester hours.

The course introduces various aspects of real estste finance; covers all market sectors and funding sources with concentration on residential lending and secondary market for first mortgage loans; satisfies educational licensing requirement as prescribed by the Texas Real Estate License Act.
Prerequisites: FINA 3113.

FINA 3253 Real Estate Investments: 3 semester hours.

The course provides an introduction to real estate investments including analysis of real estate investment alternatives; feasibility and site analysis; tax considerations; income and expense analysis; disounted cash flow analysis; and profitability measurement.
Prerequisites: FINA 3113.

FINA 3333 Investment Analysis: 3 semester hours.

Survey of the risks and returns of investment media in relationship to the investment objectives of individual and industrial investors. Includes an examination of the capital markets, information flows, and analytical techniques in terms of their impact upon the valuation process.
Prerequisites: FINA 3103.

FINA 3383 Financial Markets and Institutions: 3 semester hours.

Domestic financial institutions and markets and their interaction in the flow of funds in the economy and the central bank and other regulatory institutions will be analyzed with an extension to international markets and institutions.
Prerequisites: FINA 3103 and ECON 2123.

FINA 3393 Finance Internship I: 3 semester hours.

Supervised full-time training in industry, government or other agencies for junior-level finance majors. Individual conferences, company performance evaluations and written reports required. The duration of the program will be one regular semester or two consecutive summer terms,
Prerequisites: FINA 3383.

FINA 4113 Retirement Planning and Employee Benefits: 3 semester hours.

The course provides students with knowledge of the different types of public and private retirement and benefit plans; specifics and operations of these plans are analyzed as well as their regulatory framework; application of these plans is stressed in such areas as needs evaluation and analysis, strategies for different life-cycle circumstances, and medical issues.
Prerequisites: FINA 3013.

FINA 4123 Estate Planning: 3 semester hours.

The course focuses on the efficient conservation and transfer of wealth, consistent with the client's goals; presents legal, tax, financial, and non-financial aspects of the process, covering such topics as wills, trusts, probate, advanced directives (living wills), charitable giving, wealth transfers and related taxes.
Prerequisites: ACCT 3333 and FINA 3013.

FINA 4213 Managerial Finance: 3 semester hours.

Issues and problems faced by financial managers with emphasis on financial analysis, capital budgeting, capital structure, dividend policy, and corporate restructuring.
Prerequisites: FINA 3103.

FINA 4303 Money and Banking: 3 semester hours.

Covers a wide spectrum of topics and issues in banking and finance, including the role and nature of money in the economy, bank management, technological innovations and the practice of banking, creation and regulation of the money supply and the institutions involved, monetary policies and the role of the Federal Reserve and Treasury Department.
Prerequisites: ECON 2123.

FINA 4313 Investment Management: 3 semester hours.

Principles of portfolio management, portfolio optimization, asset allocation, asset pricing models, investment strategies, and timing techniques portfolio performance evaluation.
Prerequisites: FINA 3333.

FINA 4343 Financial Statement Analysis: 3 semester hours.

A study of financial statements in a variety of firm valuation contexts. The course provides various tools for evaluating a firm's accounting and financial performance, the concept of earnings quality, and other related issues.
Prerequisites: (ACCT 3213 and FINA 3103).

FINA 4353 International Finance: 3 semester hours.

International financial markets and the flow of funds, exchange rates, parity relationships and arbitrage Exchange rate risk and its management. short- and long-term financing. asset and liability management. capital budgeting, and direct foreign investments for multinationals; international banking issues.
Prerequisites: FINA 3103 and ECON 2123.

FINA 4383 Derivative Securities: 3 semester hours.

Valuation of options and financial futures; risk management and hedging applications using options and futures; primary focus on stock options, index options, stock index futures, interest rate futures, foreign exchange futures options.
Prerequisites: FINA 3103.

FINA 4393 Finance Internship II: 3 semester hours.

Supervised full-time training in industry, government, or other agencies for senior-level finance majors. Individual conferences, company performance evaluations and written reports required. The duration of the program will be one regular semester or two consecutive summer terms.

FINA 4453 Special Topics in Finance: 3 semester hours.

Supervised fulltime training in industry, government, or other agencies for senior-level The course would provide a form to bring in special issues/topics of interest in the finance majors. Individual conferences, company performance evaluations and written reports required. The duration of area, such as hedge funds, speculative markets, mergers and acquisitions, and the program management of financial institutions. It will be one regular semester or two consecutive flexible in terms.
Prerequisites: ECON 2113 and ECON 2123 and FINA 3103.

FINA 4993 Independent Study in Finance: 3 semester hours.

Reading, research, and/or field work on selected topics.

FINA 5003 Concepts of Finance: 3 semester hours.

An overview of financial securities and markets, financial statement analysis, cash budgeting, working capital management, time value of money, valuation of securities, and capital budgeting.

FINA 5103 Theory of Financial Management: 3 semester hours.

Risk-return analysis, cost of capital, cash-flow analysis in capital budgeting, capital structure policy, dividend policy, corporate restructuring, and international financial management.
Prerequisites: FINA 5003.

FINA 5313 Investment Analysis and Management: 3 semester hours.

Fundamentals of investment, investment securities and markets, analysis of risk and return, fixed income securities and valuation, common stock and valuation, mutual funds, options and futures, portfolio theory and management.
Prerequisites: FINA 5003.

FINA 5333 International Finance: 3 semester hours.

International financial markets and the flow of funds, in risk management for multinationals, short- and long-term financing for multinationals, multinational capital budgeting, direct foreign investment, country risk analysis, and international banking.
Prerequisites: FINA 5003.

FINA 5383 FIN MRKT & Inst: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of the major financial markets, domestic and international, and their interrelationship through interest rates and prices, as well as flow of funds and price behavior of the market as a whole. Also, the role of financial institutions in the flow of funds and their regulation. Prerequisite(s): FINA 5003, ECON 5003 or equivalents.
Prerequisites: FINA 5003 and ECON 5003.

Management Information Systems Courses

MISY 1013 Info & Communication in the Digital Age: 3 semester hours.

The course explores living and communicating in a digital world. It includes selection and use of different types of computers, desktop and mobile, and their supported applications; an examination of the advantages and pitfalls of cloud computing and social networking; and projects designed to promote collaborative communication using multimedia and web technology with attention to formal and informal code of conduct.

MISY 2013 Fundamentals of MIS with SAP: 3 semester hours.

Overview of information systems including software and hardware issues, database management, enterprise systems, and organizational and managerial issues of fundamental business processes and functional areas, such as sales, production, accounting etc., and how they interact with an enterprise system; emphasis on hands-on learning using SAP.
Prerequisites: MISY 1013.

MISY 2123 Information Systems Applications: 3 semester hours.

An extension of MISY 1013. Includes case-based problems and management decision-making drills with alternative computer-based solutions structure. Extensive applications of contemporary microcomputer software packages to solve problems in functional areas of business. Recommended as an elective course for non-MISY majors.
Prerequisites: MISY 1013.

MISY 2153 Object-Oriented Programming Applications in Business: 3 semester hours.

This course covers the fundamental concepts of object-oriented programming as they apply to real-world business problems. Emphasis is given on the development of object-oriented program logic and design in solving programming problems in business.
Prerequisites: MISY 2013.

MISY 3323 Networking: 3 semester hours.

Specific topics include the introduction to core network concepts, network standards, physical layer propogation, Ethernet PC network, telephony and various LAN (Local Area Network) technologies, WAN (Wide Area Networks), internet working, wireless networking, network security, and network management.
Prerequisites: MISY 2013.

MISY 3393 Information Systems Internship I: 3 semester hours.

Supervised full-time training in industry, government or other agencies for junior-level information systems majors. Individual conferences, company performance evaluations and written reports required. The duration of the program will be one regular semester or two consecutive summer terms.
Prerequisites: MISY 2013.

MISY 3413 Business Database Applications: 3 semester hours.

The course provides a solid foundation in database concepts and design as they apply in business. It covers principles of conceptual as well as relational designs and includes translation of business requirements into entity relationship diagrams, normalization of tables and advanced SQL to address specific business problems.
Prerequisites: MISY 2013.

MISY 3423 Enterprise Systems Analysis and Design: 3 semester hours.

Methods, techniques, and tools involoved in information systems analysis and design and project management in enterprises with exposure to traditional methodologies like systems development life cycle, and alternative methodologies like object-oriented and agile methodologies; hands-on experience of analysis and design on enterprise systems, such as ERP.
Prerequisites: MISY 2013.

MISY 3433 JAVA Applications in Business: 3 semester hours.

The course covers the fundamental concepts of object-oriented programming (OOP) using Java language and emphasizes basic programming skills using hands-on practices. Intensive exploration of Java programming environment.
Prerequisites: MISY 2153.

MISY 4343 Cyber-Security for Electronic Commerce: 3 semester hours.

The course introduces the emerging area of electronic commerce and the security challenges and threats in the electronic commerce environment, and provides an understanding of the next generation state-of-the-art EC security technologies.
Prerequisites: MISY 3323.

MISY 4353 Information Technology Project Management: 3 semester hours.

Concepts, tools and techniques involved in Information Technology (IT) project management are presented. Focus will be on the five phases of project management: Initiating, Planning, Executing, Controlling, and Closing, and the nine project management knowledge areas: Integration Scope, Time, Cost, Quality, Human Resources, Quality, Risk.
Prerequisites: MGMT 3103 and MISY 3323.

MISY 4393 Information Systems Internship II: 3 semester hours.

Supervised full-time training in industry, government or other agencies for senior level information systems majors. Individual conferences, company performance evaluations and written reports required. The duration of the program will be one regular semester or two consecutive summer terms.

MISY 4413 E-Commerce: 3 semester hours.

The course provides technological as well as strategic and managerial aspects of electronic commerce systems. Topics covered include the use of hardware, software, architecture, payment mechanism, data security, and client and server side scripting in electronic commerce systems.
Prerequisites: MISY 3413.

MISY 4433 Adv Java Prog: 3 semester hours.

Covers advanced topics of Java programming and emphasizes the hands-on practice of Java applications. Students will be expected to explore Java programming environment intensively and develop adequate Java programming skills particularly in relation to graphical user interface, multimedia, and networking applications.
Prerequisites: MISY 3433.

MISY 4453 Special Topics in MIS: 3 semester hours.

The course provides a forum to bring in current issues in the MIS area such as information security, data mining, mobile/wireless technology and IT project management. Topics may vary from semester to semester and course can be repeated.
Prerequisites: MGMT 3103 and MISY 3323.

MISY 4523 Enterprise Strategic IT Management: 3 semester hours.

Strategic management concepts underlying the implementation of information Technology (IT) in an enterprise; pertinent IT issues such as analysis of strategic impact of IT, management of IT security and outsourcing; emphasis will be placed on hands-on learning using enterprise systems such as ERP. This course integrates issues covered in other MIS courses.
Prerequisites: MISY 3423 and MGMT 3103.

MISY 4993 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Reading, research, and/or field work on selected topics.

MISY 5103 Management Information Systems: 3 semester hours.

Foundational understanding of IS functions in relation to other business functions; current and emerging technologies; managerial and organizational understanding of IS functions within a networked or virtual organization; introduction to computer application software used by contemporary managers.

MISY 5323 Data Com & Network: 3 semester hours.

Integration of business management with data communications and networking core concepts such as fundamentals of data communication, various networking architectures and design, communication circuits and communication protocols.
Prerequisites: MISY 5103.

MISY 5413 App Database Management: 3 semester hours.

Concepts, tools, and technologies associated with the design, implementation and management of large databases for organizational effectiveness. Emphasis on the application aspect of databases.
Prerequisites: MISY 5103.

MISY 5423 Info Syst Analysis: 3 semester hours.

Focus on project planning, analysis, design, and implementation techniques, with an emphasis on the development of computer systems.
Prerequisites: MISY 5103.

MISY 5533 SP Topics in MISY: 3 semester hours.

The course provides a forum to bring in current issues in the MIS area such as project management, information security, data mining, etc. Topics may vary from semester to semester.
Prerequisites: MISY 5103.

Managerial Comm for Executives Courses

EMCO 5203 Executive Managerial Communication: 3 semester hours.

Management communication as the downward, horizontal, and upward transfer of information and exchange of meaning, through formal and informal channels. Also, includes the art of negotiation and identifies rhetorical strategies and guidelines for analyzing and resolving stakeholder conflicts.

Mngmnt Info Sys for Executives Courses

EMIS 5513 Information Technology and Organizational Value Creation: 3 semester hours.

Role of Information technology in value creation in organizations. Covers topics such as business value of organizational technologies (such as ERP, CRM, etc.). IT-based resources, capabilities, and competitive advantage.