Department of Agriculture, Nutrition and Human Ecology

Agricultural Economics Courses

AGEC 3321 Agricultural Policy: 3 semester hours.

Study of the development of agricultural and food policies and evaluation of policies impact on producers and consumers in domestic and international markets.
Prerequisites: (AGRI 2321 or AGEC 2213) and (AGEC 3322 (may be taken concurrently) or AGEC 3223 (may be taken concurrently)).

AGEC 3322 Agricultural Financial Analysis: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to principles and concepts of finance. Financial statement analysis, risk and returns, time value of money, valuation concepts, capital budgeting, investments, and cost of capital.
Prerequisites: (AGEC 3321 (may be taken concurrently) or AGEC 3213 (may be taken concurrently)) and (MATH 1113 or MATH 1314).

AGEC 3325 International Trade and Logistics: 3 semester hours.

Development of basic competencies in international marketing of food and agricultural products. Focus will be on major markets, international competition, and the impacts of US trade policies and exchange rates on trade.
Prerequisites: (AGRI 2317 or AGEC 1233 or ECON 2113 or ECON 2302) and (MATH 1113 or MATH 1314).

AGEC 3399 Independent Study: 1-3 semester hour.

Reading, research and/or field work on selected topics.

AGEC 4322 Agribusiness Management: 3 semester hours.

Economic and business principles applied to the organization and operation of farms and ranches, and other agri-business industries.
Prerequisites: (AGRI 2317 or AGEC 1233 or ECON 2113 or ECON 2302) and (MATH 1113 or MATH 1314).

AGEC 4323 Land and Resource Economics: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of the economic, political, and institutional forces involved in the control and use of land and natural resources. Emphasis on land as a factor of production in agriculture.
Prerequisites: ((AGEC 2317 or AGEC 1233) or (ECON 2113 or ECON 2302)) and (MATH 1113 or MATH 1314).

AGEC 4325 Agricultural Prices: 3 semester hours.

Theories and principles fundamental to the pricing of agriculture commodities. Special emphasis will be placed on marketing conditions affecting price levels. Price and income parity, seasonal and cyclical price variations and futures trading. Prerequisites: senior classification or approval of instructor.
Prerequisites: ((AGEC 1233 or AGRI 2317) or (ECON 2113 or ECON 2302)) and (MATH 1113 or MATH 1314).

AGEC 4399 Independent Study: 1-3 semester hour.

Readings, research and/or field work on selected topics.

AGEC 5223 Farm and Ranch Management: 3 semester hours.

Theories of the farm and of the management process; farm-ranch business growth and productive efficiency; control and coordination of the agents of production; risk and uncertainty; agribusiness organization and management; and managerial decision making. Laboratory application of principles of economics to the production process, including analysis of costs, returns, and productivity.

AGEC 5243 Agricultural Policy: 3 semester hours.

Theoretical foundations of policy making and economic value of public policies and programs to the agricultural industry; interrelation between the social, political, and economic systems and agriculture; policy development and implementation; and the value of agricultural policy to society.

Agricultural Engineering Courses

AGEG 4342 Farm Drainage: 3 semester hours.

Land drainage: terracing, gully control, irrigation, and land reclamation.

Ag and Human Resources Courses

AGHR 3379 Cooperative Occupational Experience in Agriculture: 3 semester hours.

Pre-baccalaureate work experience in the food and agriculture sciences commensurate with the student's academic emphasis. Written report of activities consistent with program guidelines upon completion of experience. A minimum of 100 clock hours of supervised work activities is required.

AGHR 3699 Cooperative Occupational Experience in Agriculture: 6 semester hours.

Pre-baccalaureate work experience in the food and agricultural sciences commensurate with the student's academic emphasis. Written report of activities consistent with program guidelines upon completion of experience. A minimum of 200 clock hours of supervised work activities are required.

AGHR 4341 Special Topics: 3 semester hours.

Study of a problem affecting some aspect of the food and agricultural science industry. Reports, discussion and major paper required. Repeatable for up to 6 semester credit hours.

AGHR 4399 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research and/or field work on selected topics. Prerequisite: Advisor consent.

Agriculture Courses

AGRI 1301 Natural Resource Conservation Management: 3 semester hours.

Ecological approach to basic conservation principles, concepts and techniques underlying the management and uses of natural resources that is both efficient and sustainable.
Prerequisites: (AGRI 1370 or AGRO 1703) and (AGRO 2633 or AGRI 2363).

AGRI 1311 Dairy Science: 3 semester hours.

Branches of the dairy industry, introduction to dairy types and breeds, the major factors in the management of cattle for milk production, and the common dairy processes.
Prerequisites: AGRI 1319 or ANSC 1513.

AGRI 1319 General Animal Science: 3 semester hours.

Introductory course dealing with domestic farm animals common in the United States. Selection, reproduction, nutrition, management and marketing of beef cattle, swine, sheep, goats, and horses.

AGRI 1327 Poultry Science: 3 semester hours.

Knowledge of the history and development of the poultry industry; the anatomy and physiology of the domestic fowl, especially related to reproduction. Inferences of genetic, environmental and behavioral factors on embryonic development; effects of diet, drugs and toxins. Practices involve artificial incubation, breeding and rearing.
Prerequisites: (AGRI 1319 or ANSC 1513) and (AGRI 2351 (may be taken concurrently) or ANSC 2513) and (AGRI 1311 (may be taken concurrently) or ANSC 2533).

AGRI 1330 Land Grant System and Global Food Security: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed to educate students about the land grant mission, created by the Morrill Act passed by Congress in 1862 and 1890. Areas related to science technology in Global Food Security and Sustainable Food program will be emphasized. Students will actively participate in peer workshops to demonstrate critical thinking skills gained through programs.

AGRI 1331 Agricultural Science and Technology: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to professions in agricultural sciences and technology. Importance of agriculture in the state, nation and world. Review of research developments; explorations of career and other opportunities and development of human resource skills needed in agriculture.

AGRI 1341 Fundamentals of Agricultural Engineering: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the major areas of agricultural engineering with emphasis on solving practical problems in agricultural production systems, grain systems, food systems, and hydrology. Course includes hands on work.

AGRI 1370 Crop Science: 3 semester hours.

Botanical characteristics of agronomic and horticultural plants; relationship between crops and civilization in both historical and biological terms; nature of crop plants in relation to structure, physiology, environment, growth and development; crop improvement, cropping systems and practices, crop hazards and prevention.

AGRI 2317 Fundamentals of Agricultural Economics: 3 semester hours.

Survey of the nature, organization, and operation of the agricultural industry: application of economic principles to production and to the marketing of farm-ranch food and fiber products: and investigation of institutions and government as they affect agriculture.

AGRI 2321 Marketing Agricultural Products: 3 semester hours.

Study of movement of food and fiber products from the production area to the final consumer. Focus on intermediaries, including transportation agents. Efficiency of performing marketing activities under conditions for perfect and imperfect markets will be emphasized.
Prerequisites: (AGRI 2317 or AGEC 1233) and (AGRI 2322 (may be taken concurrently) or AGEC 2223 (may be taken concurrently)).

AGRI 2322 Food Distribution Systems: 3 semester hours.

Study of the nature and functions of the various components of wholesale and retail food distribution. Facility locations, transportation, warehousing, quality control, inventory control, pricing, and other related topics.
Prerequisites: (AGEC 1233 or AGRI 2317) and (AGEC 2213 or AGRI 2321).

AGRI 2342 Agricultural Machinery: 3 semester hours.

Identification of agricultural machines and equipment; accessories, attachments, and components of agricultural tractors; inspections, adjustments, and maintenance services; and career opportunities.

AGRI 2351 Animal Production and Marketing: 3 semester hours.

Systematic study of methods of breeding, feeding, marketing, sanitation and management of commercial animals (swine, beef and dairy cattle, horses, goats and sheep).
Prerequisites: (AGRI 1319 or ANSC 1513) and (AGRI 1327 (may be taken concurrently) or ANSC 2523) and (AGRI 1311 (may be taken concurrently) or ANSC 2533).

AGRI 2354 Diseases and Sanitation: 3 semester hours.

Clinical studies of the most common livestock diseases embracing anamnesis, etiology, symptoms, diagnosis, therapeutics, and prophylaxis.
Prerequisites: (AGRI 1319 or ANSC 1513) and (AGRI 2351 (may be taken concurrently) or ANSC 2513) and (AGRI 1311 (may be taken concurrently) or ANSC 2533).

AGRI 2360 Environmental Soil Science: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to soils, its components and its relationship the environment. The importance of soils to man, animals and plants. Import physical properties, role of soil constituents; origin, nature, and classification of parent materials; soil genesis, classification and survey; soil fertility and chemical properties; soils and chemical pollution; soils and the world's food supplements.
Prerequisites: AGRI 1370 (may be taken concurrently) or AGRO 1703 (may be taken concurrently).

AGRI 2363 Forage and Pasture Management: 3 semester hours.

Use of forage in grassland agriculture, identification of forage grasses and legumes, cultural practices including weed control, mechanization of forage harvesting and storage; types of pastures, different systems of grazing management and utilization of forages by farm animals.
Prerequisites: AGRI 1370 or AGRO 1703 and (AGRI 1301 (may be taken concurrently) or AGRO 26213).

AGRI 2373 Principles of Crop Production: 3 semester hours.

Crop characteristics and classifications, growth patterns, soil and climate requirements (Physiology), pest control, storage, distribution, and application of these principles to the management and production of field and vegetable crops for improved food, fiber, and forages.
Prerequisites: AGRI 1370 or AGRO 1703 and (AGRO 2603 (may be taken concurrently) or AGRI 2360 (may be taken concurrently)).

Agronomy Courses

AGRO 3362 Soil Morphology and Classification: 3 semester hours.

The shape and source of soil features materials and processes involved in or produced after the formation of soil with emphasis on variations world-wide and the principles of soil classification, mapping, and interpretation. Additional topics include: soil taxonomy; land capability classification; soil survey and its utilization; and soil interpretations for non-farm uses.
Prerequisites: AGRO 2603 or AGRO 2360 and (AGRO 3633 (may be taken concurrently) or AGRO 3363 (may be taken concurrently)) and (AGRO 3371 (may be taken concurrently) or AGRO 3713 (may be taken concurrently)).

AGRO 3363 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers: 3 semester hours.

Chemical, biological and physical processes as they influence soil fertility, manufacture of fertilizers and their reactions with soils and the oil-plant-water system.
Prerequisites: AGRO 2603 or AGRO 2360 and (AGRO 3623 (may be taken concurrently) or AGRO 3362 (may be taken concurrently)) and (AGRO 3713 (may be taken concurrently) or AGRO 3371 (may be taken concurrently)).

AGRO 3364 Soil and Water Management: 3 semester hours.

Sustainable soil productivity and management in agricultural systems involving resource inputs, tillage systems, erosion control, residue management, and water management for a quality environment.
Prerequisites: (AGRI 2360 or AGRO 2603) and (AGRO 3373 (may be taken concurrently) or AGRO 3733).

AGRO 3371 Gen Entomology: 3 semester hours.

Insect morphology, life histories, characteristics and habits of beneficial and harmful insects and their impact on agricultural production and the environment; anatomy and physiological growth and metamorphosis, insect orders, ecological aspects and insect behavior, control of harmful insects.
Prerequisites: AGRO 1703 or AGRI 1370 and (AGRO 3362 (may be taken concurrently) or AGRO 3623 (may be taken concurrently)) and (AGRO 3363 (may be taken concurrently) or AGRO 3633 (may be taken concurrently)).

AGRO 3373 Plant Pathology: 3 semester hours.

Fundamental principles of plant pathology, including parasites and disease development, identification of major agronomic diseases and their biotic and abiotic causes; proper diagnosis of plant diseases, differentiation between signs and symptoms, isolation of pathogens in pure culture; environmental effects on development of infectious plant diseases; control of plant diseases.
Prerequisites: AGRI 1370 or AGRO 1703 and (AGRO 3364 (may be taken concurrently) or AGRO 3643 (may be taken concurrently)).

AGRO 3399 Independent Study: 1-3 semester hour.

Readings, research and/or field work on selected topics.

AGRO 4361 Soil Microbiology: 3 semester hours.

Role of soil microorganisms in soil-plant ecosystems. Microbial ecology, microbes in nutrient cycles important to agriculture, pesticide degradation, bacterial fertilizers, composting, waste disposal, plant microbe interactions. Laboratory estimation of soil microbial populations and measurement of important biological processes in soil and current methods.
Prerequisites: AGRO 3362 or AGRO 3623 and (AGRO 3363 or AGRO 3633) and (AGRO 3364 or AGRO 3643).

AGRO 4362 Environmental Science: 3 semester hours.

Physical, chemical, biological and agricultural components of the environment and their interactions and effects on pollution and the maintenance and utilization of varied environmental systems.
Prerequisites: AGRO 3362 or AGRO 3623 and (AGRO 3363 or AGRO 3633) and (AGRO 3364 or AGRO 3643).

AGRO 4399 Independent Study: 1-3 semester hour.

Readings, research and/or field work on selected topics.

Animal Science Courses

ANSC 2255 Poultry Tech & Marketing: 2 semester hours.

Factors affecting the physical, chemical, microbiological and functional characteristics of poultry and egg products. Product development, processing, quality packaging, and quality control concepts.
Prerequisites: ANSC 1513.

ANSC 3350 Animal Nutrition: 3 semester hours.

Composition and digestibility of feed, with physiology, preparation, feeding standards, calculation and balancing rations for commercial animal (swine, cattle-beef and dairy, sheep, goats, and horses).
Prerequisites: ANSC 1513.

ANSC 3351 Anatomy and Physiology: 3 semester hours.

Comparative approach, anatomically and physiologically of the basic systems of the domestic animals.

ANSC 3352 Meat Science: 3 semester hours.

Methods of slaughtering farm animals, processing, curing preservation and storage of meats and products.
Prerequisites: ANSC 1513 or AGRI 1319.

ANSC 3399 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research and/or field work on selected topics.

ANSC 3451 Anatomy and Physiology: 4 semester hours.

Comparative approach, anatomically and physiologically of the basic systems of domestic animals.
Prerequisites: AGRI 1319 or ANSC 1513.

ANSC 3699 Independent Study: 1-6 semester hour.

Readings, research and/or field work on selected topics.

ANSC 4353 Breeding/Genetics: 3 semester hours.

Physiology of reproduction, breeding, breeding systems and practices. Application of genetic principles to the problems of animal breeding. Prerequisite: Junior standing.
Prerequisites: ANSC 1513 and ANSC 2513.

ANSC 4399 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research and/or field work on selected topics.

ANSC 4499 Independent Study: 1-4 semester hour.

Readings, Research and/or field work on selected topics.

Food Science Courses

FDSC 3358 Food Quality Assurance and Sanitation: 3 semester hours.

Examination of the elements of a comprehensive quality assurance program. Areas of study include sanitation, pest control, waste disposal, food law regulations, sensory testing, panel selection and training, and experimental design and analysis of data.

FDSC 3359 Food Bacteriology: 3 semester hours.

Microbiology of human foods and accessory substances. Raw and processed foods, physical, chemical and biological phases of spoilage. Standard industry techniques of inspection and control.

FDSC 4357 Food Processing and Engineering: 3 semester hours.

Study of the principles and practices of thermal processing, quick freezing, dehydration, fluid flows, heat transfer, pickling and juice manufacture.

Human Development & Family Courses

HDFM 2351 Childhood Disorders: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed to introduce a general overview and treatment of major childhood disorders. It examines the history of childhood psychopathology, theories of development, medical and biological factors, mental retardation, drug and alcohol use, social and environment factors that relate to childhood problems.

HDFM 2353 The Contemporary Family in Cross-Cultural Perspective: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of family interaction patterns, roles, and functions, throughout the life cycle as influenced by customs, cultural diversity, and socioeconomic status with implications for broader understanding of a multicultural society. Examination of public policies and procedures impacting family functioning.

HDFM 2355 Human Development: Life Span: 3 semester hours.

The dynamic processes of co-development of the individual from conception to senescence in physical, sensory, intellectual, emotional, and social development, Pattern of self-development with focus on the interaction between and among individuals.

HDFM 3350 Early Childhood Environments: 3 semester hours.

Study and analysis of varied environments for children. Guidelines for program planning, identification and selection of creative and expressive materials and equipment, staffing, organization and management, record keeping, licensing requirements, parent/child/teacher interactions, and effective guidance techniques. Observation, participation and assessment required.

HDFM 3351 Individual and Family Counseling Strategies: 3 semester hours.

Study, assessment and application of basic interviewing and counseling strategies to include varied interviewing models, techniques and methods which facilitate individual and family interactions.

HDFM 3352 Parenting Issues and Education: 3 semester hours.

Principles and patterns, philosophies and theories, methodologies and practices, and resources for the design, implementation, and evaluation of programs for enhancing parenting skills in the parent-child relationship.

Human Nutrition & Food Courses

HUNF 1130 Introduction to Dietetics: 1 semester hour.

Students will be introduced to the profession of dietetics. The history of dietetics, career options, professional development (dietetics portfolio), the Academy code of ethics, standards of practice, the legislative process, and professional resources will be discussed.

HUNF 1322 Nutrition and Wellness: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to human nutrition and food. Study of human nutritional needs and problems encountered in providing food for the satisfaction of physiological and socio-cultural system needs, and the significance of these interrelationships to health. Discussion of current nutritional issues.

HUNF 2353 Intermediate Nutrition: 3 semester hours.

Introductory study of the principles of nutrition and the application of these principles to providing adequate nutrition to humans. Introduction to the biochemical and physiological approach to nutrition will be emphasized.
Prerequisites: HUSC 1322 or HUSC 1343.

HUNF 2363 Food Service Systems: 3 semester hours.

Study of the layout and design, equipment selection, and specifications of Food Service organizations, with emphasis on safety, sanitation, labor and financial control and consumer distribution.

HUNF 2365 Food Principles and Meal Management: 3 semester hours.

Principles of preparation, organization, and management applied to planning, preparation, serving, and marketing nutritious meals to individuals and groups at varied socioeconomic levels. Management of work areas, organization techniques, and standards for meal service and table appointments.
Prerequisites: HUSC 1322 or HUSC 1343.

HUNF 2366 Food Systems Management: 3 semester hours.

Management principles, process and control strategies, roles and responsibilities in food service systems. Application of food preparation and management principles to quantity food production including menu planning, procurement, storage and distribution.

HUNF 3360 Nutritional Biochemistry: 3 semester hours.

A study of the biochemical basis of nutrition, the physiochemical properties of nutrients, and other essential biochemical and their roles in physiological and metabolic processes.
Prerequisites: HUNF 2533.

HUNF 3361 Nutrition Throughout the Lifecycle: 3 semester hours.

Comparative assessment evaluation of nutrition and dietary requirements throughout the lifecycle. Pre-pregnancy, pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence. adulthood, and aging. Nutritional needs on the basis of both physical growth and psychological development are emphasized.
Prerequisites: HUSC 1322 or HUSC 1343.

HUNF 3362 Food Science and Technology: 3 semester hours.

Principles and techniques of food processing and preservation and their effects on nutrient retention. Food and drug regulations, food additives and standards of identity.
Prerequisites: CHEM 2303 or CHEM 2033 and (CHEM 2203 or CHEM 2032) and (HUNF 2365 or HUNF 2653).

HUNF 3363 Advanced Nutrition: 3 semester hours.

A review of the fundamentals of human nutrition. Course provides a comprehensive study of the structure and functions of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins and minerals in metabolism, and how these nutrients are used in the prevention of diseases.
Prerequisites: HUNF 2353 or HUNF 2533.

HUNF 3364 Food and Culture: 3 semester hours.

Food and Culture explores the connections between what we eat and who we are through a cross-cultural study of how personal and social identities are formed via food production, preparation, and consumption.
Prerequisites: HUNF 1301 or HUNF 1130.

HUNF 3365 Nutrition and Disease: 3 semester hours.

Study of the physiological and metabolic anomalies in chronic and acute diseases, and principles of nutritional therapy and prevention. Computer assisted nutritional assessment and diet calculations.
Prerequisites: HUNF 2353 or HUNF 2533.

HUNF 3367 Nutritional Assessment: 3 semester hours.

The course provides an in-depth to the purpose, concepts, methods, and scientific basis for assessment of nutritional status for individuals and groups. Students will have the opportunity to apply nutritional assessment principles and methods discussed in class in a supervised setting.
Prerequisites: HUNF 2533 and MATH 1113.

HUNF 3399 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research and/or field work on selected topics.

HUNF 4330 Human Nutrition and Food Practicum: 3 semester hours.

Planned observation and entry-level work experience in selected clinical, hospital, business, industrial, educational or governmental settings in Nutrition, Food Science, Foods, Dietetics or Nutrition Research. Required field experience includes a minimum of 200 clock hours of supervised work activities.

HUNF 4347 Nutrition Counseling: 3 semester hours.

This course is a directed study in theories, behavior change models, nutrition counseling, ADA Scope of Dietetics Practice Framework, the Standards of Professional Performance, the Code of Ethics of Dietetics, interdisciplinary relationships, and current issues in Human Nutrition.
Prerequisites: HUNF 3365 or HUNF 3653 and (HUNF 4366 or HUNF 4663Q).

HUNF 4360 Physiochemical Aspects of Food: 3 semester hours.

This course covers physical and chemical factors accounting for color, flavor, and texture of natural and processed foods. Laboratory experiments to illustrate the effects of varying ingredients and treatment on the quality of food products. Objective and Sensory testing to determine food quality characteristics will be conducted.
Prerequisites: HUNF 3362 or HUNF 3623.

HUNF 4361 Research in Nutrition: 3 semester hours.

Investigate special topics in nutrition. Research methodology and computer application including statistical analysis. Proposals prepared by students and presented to instructor for approval. Students work independently, seeking guidance as necessary.
Prerequisites: MATH 1342 or MATH 2003.

HUNF 4366 Medical Nutrition Therapy I: 3 semester hours.

Focus will be on Nutrition Care Process in Nutritional Screening Assessment, and Diagnosis of Metabolic, Cardiovascular and infectious disease states. Emphasis will be on medical terminology, clinical, anthropometric and nutritional data analysis, documentation, and provision of care.
Prerequisites: (HUNF 3361 or HUNF 3613) and (HUNF 3365 or HUNF 3653).

HUNF 4367 Medical Nutrition Therapy II: 3 semester hours.

Focus will be on Nutrition Care Process (NCP) in the treatment of metabolic, cardiovascular and infectious disease states.
Prerequisites: HUNF 4366 or HUNF 4663.

HUNF 4369 Community Nutrition and Health: 3 semester hours.

Study of human nutrition and health problems from a community perspective; programs and policies related to nutrition at local, state and federal levels; approaches and techniques of effective application and dissemination of nutrition knowledge in communities.
Prerequisites: HUSC 1322 or HUSC 1343 and (HUNF 3361 or HUNF 3613).

HUNF 4399 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research and/or field work on selected topics.

Human Science Courses

HUSC 1135 Human Sciences Perspectives: 1 semester hour.

The history and development of home economics as family, consumer and human sciences. Preparation, competencies and enrichment in the broad spectrum of human science professions; career development and career alternatives; interaction techniques for development of satisfying interpersonal skills.

HUSC 1322 Ecology of Human Nutrition and Food: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to human nutrition and food. Study of human nutritional needs and problems encountered in providing food for the satisfaction of physiological and socio-cultural systems needs, and the significance of these interrelationships to health. Discussion of current nutritional issues.

HUSC 3332 Program Planning II: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of the application of multiple strategies appropriate for delivering human science concepts to varied audiences utilizing multifaceted mediums. Includes examination and use of media, materials, supplies, equipment, and procedures for management, motivation and evaluation techniques.

HUSC 3337 Child Development: 3 semester hours.

Study and analysis of individual development and behavior during the early school years to adolescence with emphasis on physical, cognitive, social, language, and emotional areas. Examination of developmental and learning theories, principles of normal and atypical development and varied guidance techniques. Observation, recording and evaluation of behaviors required.

HUSC 3399 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research and/or field work on selected topics.

HUSC 4399 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research, and/or field work on selected topics.

HUSC 4430 Family Consumer Economics and Management: 4 semester hours.

A systems approach to family resource management through theory analysis and exploration of varying family structure, styles, and conditions. Simulated laboratory in group living required. Laboratory fee required.

HUSC 4630 Human Sciences Internship: 6 semester hours.

Planned program of observation and entry-level work experience in selected business or industrial firms, educational or governmental agencies/organizations in the food, agricultural and/or human sciences.

HUSC 5331 Dietetic Seminar II: 3 semester hours.

Continuation of Dietetic Seminar I. Study of current research and legislative events in nutrition and dietetics as they relate to the health and wellness of individuals and families.

HUSC 5332 Marriage and Family Therapy Pre-Practicum: 3 semester hours.

Experimental application of varied therapeutic techniques, i.e. lecture, role play, small group and self-exploration as applied by the therapist in a variety of therapeutic settings.
Prerequisites: HUSC 5375 or HUSC 5753.

HUSC 5334 Research Problems: 3 semester hours.

Study of research methods, strategies and techniques application to the social and behavioral sciences with focus on individual and family studies and the role of research in professional and therapeutic services. Critical comparative analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of current research studies and the planning for needed research. Proposal writing required.

HUSC 5335 Dietetic Seminar I: 3 semester hours.

Study of the delivery of nutritional services for individuals, families and institutions. Major emphasis on the current development in nutrition and dietetics. Reading, discussion and reports and presentations focusing on the professional practice of dietetics.

HUSC 5351 Family Theory and Issues: 3 semester hours.

A comprehensive review of theoretical-conceptual frameworks and research in family studies. Role of theory and research in the interdisciplinary study of individual and family behavior throughout the life cycle.

HUSC 5355 Human Development: 3 semester hours.

Study of multiple psycho biosocial characteristics of human development and behavior throughout the lifespan. Examination, evaluation and interpretation of developmental theories and current issues and trends.

HUSC 5356 Marriage and Family Therapy Practicum I: 3 semester hours.

Supervised clinical practicum in marriage and family therapy. Therapeutic sessions with a variety of client issues and the utilization of major therapeutic techniques required. 100 clock hours of supervised field placement required.
Prerequisites: (HUSC 5339 or HUSC 5393) and (HUSC 5351 or HUSC 5533) and (HUSC 5354 or HUSC 5543) and (HUSC 5355 or HUSC 5553).

HUSC 5358 Mental Health and Psychopathology: 3 semester hours.

Exploration of healthy personality and functional coping in personal/social context. Review and study of various models of psychopathology including DSM and organic disease in the mental health setting. Roles and characteristics of the therapist in the supervision of trainees in varied clinical settings.
Prerequisites: HUSC 5355 or HUSC 5553.

HUSC 5361 Victimization and Crisis Management: 3 semester hours.

This course explores forms of victimization and crisis management in a clinical setting, with an emphasis on demonstrating diagnostic competence, treatment plan development, and effective and appropriate therapeutic techniques.

HUSC 5362 Counseling Diverse Populations: 3 semester hours.

An experiential course exploring areas of cultural diversity relevant to gender, ethnicity, sexual identity, and other diversities in a therapeutic practice, with an emphasis on developing cultural competence, sensitivity and awareness to diversity. Other dimensions of diversity will be covered.

HUSC 5364 Clinical Assessment: 3 semester hours.

Course provides fundamental assessment principles focused on test and non-test appraisal instruments and development of diagnostic skills. Course includes selection, execution and interpretation of instruments appropriate for individual, couple, and family appraisal. Clinical documentation skills are developed.

HUSC 5368 Family Ethics and Issues: 3 semester hours.

Critical review of current literature on family ethics: principle problems of confidentiality, therapist and client relationships; special consideration given to state and federal law.

HUSC 5369 Thesis: 3 semester hours.

Independent and original research leading to an acceptable master's thesis prospectus prepared under the direction of a faculty thesis committee and must be orally defended and approved by all members of the faculty thesis committee before credit is recorded. The student must be registered for Thesis until satisfactorily completed.
Prerequisites: HUSC 5334.

HUSC 5371 Group Therapy: 3 semester hours.

Comprehensive study of methods, processes and strategies utilized in group therapy with individuals throughout the life span. Focus on the roles of client and therapist within varied settings for practical application of group therapy approaches.

HUSC 5374 Addiction and Family Intervention: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of the psychodynamics of addictions as they relate to individual, family and community from a family systems perspective. Comparison of major theories and treatment modalities as viewed from ethical, multicultural and legal perspectives.

HUSC 5399 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research, and/ or field placement focusing on pre-selected issues.

HUSC 5632 Advanced Practice in Dietetics I: 6 semester hours.

Preplanned experience at the professional level in dietetic administration, food service management, clinical and therapeutic nutrition and community and public health nutrition.

HUSC 5635 Advanced Practice in Dietetics II: 6 semester hours.

Continuation of Advanced Practice in Dietetics I.

HUSC 5693 Thesis: 3 semester hours.

Independent and original research leading to an acceptable master's thesis prospectus prepared under the direction of a faculty thesis committee and must be orally defended and approved by all members of the faculty thesis committee before credit is recorded. The student must be registered for Thesis until satisfactorily completed.
Prerequisites: HUSC 5393 or HUSC 5339 and (HUSC 5543 or HUSC 5354) and (HUSC 5553 or HUSC 5355).

HUSC 5699 Independent Study: 1-6 semester hour.

Readings, research, and/ or field placement focusing on pre-selected issues.