College of Juvenile Justice

Criminal Justice Courses

CRIJ 1301 Introduction to Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

Inquiry and evaluation of the principles, philosophy and history of criminal justice including the constitutional restraints imposed on criminal justice officials. Emphasis will be on the criminal justice officials' role in the prevention and control of crime and delinquency. Requires effective written, oral and visual expression of ideas. Students will compare emperical and quantitative data on typologies of crime, offenders and victims in America. The course addresses cultural and sub-cultural influences on crime, justice, civic responsibility and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national and global communities to understand crime and crime prevention.

CRIJ 1306 Court Systems and Practices: 3 semester hours.

The legal procedures for arrest, complaint, presentation before the magistrate, grand jury consideration, indictment or waiver, arraignment, and the admissibility of evidence on these issues; pretrial matters, post-verdict motions, sentencing, and appeal.

CRIJ 1307 Crime in America: 3 semester hours.

The course requires that students critically examine and analyze crime issues and trends in America. It includes presentations from active practitioners and researchers in the field of criminal justice on the current state of crime in America and an examination of offenders' rationale for crime. Students will express their ideas effectively through written, oral or visual means. They will compare empirical and quantitative data on typologies of crime, offenders and victims in America. The course addresses cultural and subcultural influences on crime, civic engagement and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national and global communities toward crime prevention.

CRIJ 1313 Juvenile Justice Systems: 3 semester hours.

An overview of the Juvenile Justice System including research and theoretical perspectives. It includes an in-depth study of the system and early decision-making process with focus on the police, the juvenile courts and the limits on juvenile sanctions. Community-based corrections with a historical perspective on juvenile probation and juvenile aftercare are also examined. A thorough working knowledge of institutionalization in terms of the treatment of juvenile offenders is provided.

CRIJ 2301 Alternatives to Incarceration: 3 semester hours.

An examination of various correctional alternatives to incarceration including probation, parole, developments in the technological monitoring of offenders, and community-based reintegration and rehabilitation efforts.

CRIJ 2311 Intro Geog Info System: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the fundamentals of Geographic Information System (GIS) and science and art of making maps. The course introduces students to the basic principles of using GIS as tool for managing and analyzing spatial data.

CRIJ 2313 Correctional Systems and Practices: 3 semester hours.

An examination of the organization, administration and management of correctional facilities and programs in the United States. It includes a study of the populations served, sentencing structures and their outcomes for the individuals, families and communities involved.

CRIJ 2314 Introduction to Criminal Investigation and Identification: 3 semester hours.

A survey of scientific crime detection methods, the identification and presentation of evidence. Instrumentation, and crime report writing.

CRIJ 2323 Criminal Procedure: 3 semester hours.

An examination of the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Amendments regarding search and seizure, warrant requirements, the right to counsel, confessions, and the admissibility of evidence.

CRIJ 2328 Police Systems and Practices: 3 semester hours.

A study of the structural aspects and principles of personnel management, program development, fiscal management, and other major components of police organization.

CRIJ 2343 Police Community Relations: 3 semester hours.

An examination of various aspects of police- community relations. It includes the effects of various forms of policing styles on community dynamics, misperceptions and bias on the part of both communities and the police. Other topics include civil rights and civil liberties as they relate to law enforcement policy.

CRIJ 2344 Introduction to Homeland Security: 3 semester hours.

The course will introduce students to the history of the Department of Homeland Security as a federal entity and homeland security as an area of study in the United States. It will include major research and theoretical perspectives that have resulted in significant initiatives to keep persons in the United States safe from various threats.

CRIJ 2345 Introduction to Terrorism: 3 semester hours.

The study of the history and development of terrorism the various types of terrorism, including narcoterrorism, religious terrorism, state-sponsored terrorism and domestic terrorism. Emphasis will be placed on counter-terrorism program.

CRIJ 2348 Introduction to Emergency Management: 3 semester hours.

This course presents the theories, principles, and approaches to managing both natural and man-made emergencies. The philosophy of Comprehensive Emergency Management will be discussed with the four attendant steps which include mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. An analysis of past disasters will be presented along with their impacts on policy formation leading up to the current FEMA all-hazards approach. The role, duties, an importance of the Emergency Manager will be discussed. Finally, legal issues involving emergency management will be presented.

CRIJ 2366 Evidence Law: 3 semester hours.

A study of Evidence Law with an emphasis on burden of proof, relevance, judicial notices, real and demonstrative evidence (including documents), the Hearsay Rule and its exceptions, privileges, unlawfully obtained evidence, and presumptions of guilt and innocence.

CRIJ 2372 Theory and Development of Juvenile Gangs: 3 semester hours.

This course is a comprehensive, in-depth coverage of historical and contemporary reactions to juvenile gangs. Among the key areas to be covered will be the legal and social definitions of juvenile delinquency, the theories, the social context, and the institutional responses. An understanding of public policy and its impact on juvenile gangs will complete the course.

CRIJ 2374 Law of Juvenile Justice: 3 semester hours.

The course offers an examination of both substantive and procedural laws related to juvenile justice including criminal law, criminal procedure, evidence, and family codes. The course also examines the institutions that enforce these laws and the principal actors involved. Finally, the course examines current trends and projections in juvenile justice.

CRIJ 2381 Computer Applications in Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the interface necessary for functioning effectively in various areas of criminal justice. The course also examines how the use of computers and related technology has changed the process of maintaining law and order nationally and internationally. It includes a review of social engineering techniques (ways that people might enhance personal and institutional security) and the field of computer forensics.

CRIJ 2391 Practical Forensic Science: 3 semester hours.

Introduces forensic crime scene investigation (CSI) and examines methods utilized in the forensic analysis of crime scenes, pattern evidence, instruments, firearms, questionsed documents, and controlled substances.

CRIJ 3331 Prevention and Control: 3 semester hours.

A systematic examination of various crime control efforts involving primary and secondary prevention and the implementation of treatment programs. The course also offers a review of the best practices in crime control and prevention.

CRIJ 3346 Transnational Crimes: 3 semester hours.

The study of criminal behavior that transcends traditional national boundaries. The course will focus on the origins of these types of crimes and the efforts of law enforcement to address them. Cyber-terrorism, cyber-crimes, human trafficking, drug trafficking and other international crimes will be reviewed.

CRIJ 3351 Crime Scene Investigation: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the techniques and tools for investigating a crime scene. Legal aspects of the processes relevant to various types of evidence are reviewed and practiced given legal standards for evidence.

CRIJ 3352 Forensic Investigation of Sex Crimes: 3 semester hours.

The investigation of sex crimes is a specific function for many criminal justice agencies, requiring an understanding of how to investigate, process crime scenes, interact with victims and ofenders, and prepare for court.
Prerequisites: CRIJ 3351.

CRIJ 3353 Technology and Crime: 3 semester hours.

A review of trends, and techniques involved in the use of technology to commit crime, or as the target of the crime. There is also a focus on investigative tools and technique for extracting evidence from technological sources, given legal and professional standards of evidence.
Prerequisites: CRJS 3513 or CRIJ 3351.

CRIJ 3354 Forensic Photography: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the techniques of forensic photography, including step-by-step process of handling crime scene evidence and maintenance of the crime scene, digital imaging, and the technology of the future.
Prerequisites: CRJS 3513 or CRIJ 3351.

CRIJ 3362 Criminal Law: 3 semester hours.

A study of basic principles of substantive criminal law which include definitions of crimes against persons and property. Emphasis is on the Texas Penal Code as it pertains to murder, capital murder, voluntary homicide, criminal negligence, homicide, and sexual offenses. Additional focus will be placed on the Texas Penal Code related to arson, robbery, burglary, theft, forgery, embezzlement, and false pretense.

CRIJ 3365 Drugs, Crime and Society: 3 semester hours.

This course will examine the relationship between drugs, alcohol, crime and human behavior. It will include an examination of the social construction of drug issues, the war on drugs, drug control policy, and the function of drugs in popular cultural mediums. The course will also examine topics that include asset forfeiture, the confidential informant role in drug enforcement, drug ethnography, the leading theories of drug use and abuse, community and corrections-based substance abuse treatment, and drug enforcement strategies.

CRIJ 3373 Juvenile Probation and Parole: 3 semester hours.

A survey and analysis of juvenile probation aftercare. The course addresses the history and legal aspects of probation, role and responsibilities of the juvenile probation officer including pre-sentence investigation reports, conducting risk assessment, case planning, caseload supervision, probation officer safety, professional ethics, and trends in the field.

CRIJ 3382 Criminal Justice Research Methods I: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to research techniques such as formulating research questions, research design, and data collection methods such as surveys and case studies. The course also examines research ethics, locating data and navigating the special requirements for conducting research with protected populations such as incarcerated adults and juveniles. Students are also introduced to computer applications for research.

CRIJ 3393 Minorities and the Criminal Justice System: 3 semester hours.

An analysis of problems frequently encountered by minorities in the American justice system. This includes police-minority confrontations, an examination of possible bias throughout various levels of the justice system and the contributions of minority criminal justice practitioners, scholars, and activists to the development of the field of criminal justice.

CRIJ 4332 Criminal Justice Management Principles: 3 semester hours.

A study of basic criminal justice management theories and contemporary practices. This includes an examination of the unique behaviors, social skills and organizational techniques necessary for the criminal justice professional to be successful in various settings. Special attention is given to relating effectively with superiors, colleagues, subordinates and various members of the public impacted by criminal justice agencies.

CRIJ 4354 Interview and Interrogation Techniques: 3 semester hours.

The course introduces techniques of interviewing victims and witnesses and interrogating suspects and includes legal issues and various methods to enhance information obtained including analysis of verbal and non-verbal actions and how they relate to truth or deception of persons during the interview process.

CRIJ 4355 Death Investigations: 3 semester hours.

The course provides an overview of various investigative methods utilized in general death investigation, as well as specific investigations involving suicides, accidents, homicides, and child deaths. The importance of crime scene analysis; investigative processes; crime scene management; case management, and scientific tools necessary for death investigations will be discussed.
Prerequisites: CRIJ 3351.

CRIJ 4361 Courtroom Testimony and Procedure: 3 semester hours.

This course covers the historical and contemporary issues surrounding courtroom evidence and focuses on testimony decisions, preperation for trial of expert and lay witnesses, and procedures used in presenting the evidence.

CRIJ 4362 Evidence Processing: 3 semester hours.

This course covers the historical and contemporary issues surrounding courtroom evidence and focuses on testimony decisions, preperation for trial of expert and lay witnesses, and procedures used in presenting the evidence.

CRIJ 4365 Constitutional Rights of the Criminally Accused: 3 semester hours.

A study of the rights of the criminally accused according to the United States Constitution.

CRIJ 4391 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems: 3 semester hours.

An analysis of criminal justice systems and institutions outside of the United States.

CRIJ 4392 Criminology: 3 semester hours.

Focus will be a comprehensive analysis of the sociological, psychological and biological aspects of deviant human behavior.

CRIJ 4395 Special Topics in Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

This course has a revolving theme from semester to semester. Theme areas include but are not limited to policing, courts, corrections, ethics, women and crime, economics and crime, white collar crime, terrorism, consensual crime, victimology, alternative dispute resolution, media influences and special topics in juvenile justice. (May be repeated once for credit as the course theme changes).

CRIJ 4396 Philosophy of Crime: 3 semester hours.

An examination of religious and economic principles as they shape the definition and response to crime. This includes an analysis of specific concepts such as guilt, shame, care, love, desire and dignity on the evolution of deviance and crime across time and place in the western world.

CRIJ 4398 Ethical Decision-Making in Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

An overview of ethical theories, concepts, and issues. Illustrates the major unethical themes common in Criminal Justice management. Illustrates ethical dilemmas in policing, courts, prisons, community corrections, and crime prevention. The class works together to develop foundational ethical truths upon which to logically develop practice of moral decision making.

CRIJ 4641 Undergraduate Internship in Criminal Justice: 6 semester hours.

A student may be required to satisfactorily complete a minimum of 200 hours (over the course of a semester) of the internship in an approved criminal justice setting preferably between the junior and senior year. This internship program is specifically designed to acquaint the student with practical aspects of criminal justice.

CRIJ 4671 Internship in Criminal Justice and Criminalistics: 3-6 semester hour.

A student may be required to complete satisfactorily a minimum of 200 hours imternship at an approved crimnal justice /criminalistic setting preferably in the senior year during a regular semester. This internship program is specifically designed to acquaint the student with practical aspects of criminal justice/criminalistic.

Juvenile Justice Courses

JJUS 5311 Foundations of Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

An in-depth examination of the history and origin of the American criminal justice system as it relates to contemporary issues in the United States.

JJUS 5312 Foundations of Juvenile Justice: 3 semester hours.

An examination of the juvenile justice system: History, structure, and interrelationships among law enforcement, juvenile and adult courts, and juvenile corrections. Includes an exploration of federal, state, county, and local laws and programs; emphasizes case and statutory law, constitutional procedures, and the philosophy of parens patriae. Required of all MSJJ students.

JJUS 5322 Substance Abuse: 3 semester hours.

Provides a critical examination of various policy responses to the "drug problem" in the United States based upon a review of selected empirical and theoretical studies. Includes an overview of drug usage by youth and adults and the relationship between drug usage and juvenile crime.

JJUS 5324 Community Building and Organizing: 3 semester hours.

Includes an understanding of theories, methods of analysis, and techniques of intervention employed in pursuing community change. By studying juvenile justice agencies, child helping programs and organizations in the community, a special emphasis is placed on juvenile crime prevention. Techniques for the empowerment of people, problem solving, community building, discovering resources within the community and issues of volunteering are addressed.

JJUS 5325 Domestic and Family Violence: 3 semester hours.

Addresses types of family violence by examining the extent of the problem, factors contributing to violence, and the consequences of family violence upon the individual, family, community, and society. Emphasis is placed on prevention techniques, non-violent conflict resolution strategies, and programs and services for training and interventions.

JJUS 5326 Victimization: 3 semester hours.

This course examines victimization through a review of the history, theoretical explanations, and consequences of maltreatment and victimization. Throughout the course the risk factors, types, consequences as well as responses to maltreatment and victimization will be examined.

JJUS 5343 Correctional Programming: 3 semester hours.

Reviews the broad range of correctional programming options in the field of juvenile justice. Presents the theoretical foundations and empirical research that illuminates the most effective correctional programming of reducing juvenile delinquency and offending recidivism.

JJUS 5344 Alternatives to Incarceration: 3 semester hours.

A study of descriptive and inferential statistics, measures of central tendency and variability, estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, simple and multiple regression and nonparametric methods. Students learn the use and value of each statistical technique.
Prerequisites: JJUS 5312 and JJUS 5376 and JJUS 5394.

JJUS 5345 Law Enforcement and Juvenile Offenders: 3 semester hours.

This course examines multicultural issues in America and the relationship between juveniles and law enforcement. It broadly focuses on issues that relates law enforcement bias racial profiling.

JJUS 5352 Management of Juvenile Justice Organizations: 3 semester hours.

An examination of management and leadership principles as they apply to juvenile justice organizations and agencies. A special focus is placed on the study of government and nonprofit agencies.

JJUS 5376 Theories of Delinquency: 3 semester hours.

An in-depth analysis of selected theories of crime causation. Readings will include theories chosen from the sociological, economic, psychological, and biological literature. Required of all MSJJ students.

JJUS 5377 Courts and Youth Offenders: 3 semester hours.

This course is an examination of juvenile law and court processes relevant to youth offenders. A special focus is placed on Texas and U.S. Supreme Court cases.

JJUS 5378 Ethics: 3 semester hours.

The analytical and normative inquiry into the philosophical foundations of decisions. Emphasis is placed on understanding dilemmas faced by juvenile justice professionals.

JJUS 5391 Special Topics in Juvenile Justice: 3 semester hours.

A seminar designed to allow flexibility in master's student degree plans and to promote awareness and understanding of issues in Juvenile Justice as these develop.

JJUS 5394 Research Methods: 3 semester hours.

Includes defining and specifying research problems; developing and testing hypotheses; the logic of causal interference; learning to use the variety of research designs; sampling procedures; the collection, processing; and storing of research data; and the ethics of research.
Prerequisites: (JJUS 5312 or JJUS 5123) and (JJUS 5376 or JJUS 5763).

JJUS 5396 Applied Statistical Methods and Computing: 3 semester hours.

A study of descriptive and inferential statistics, measures of central tendency and variability, estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, simple and multiple regression and nonparametric methods. Students learn the use and value of each statistical technique.
Prerequisites: JJUS 5312 and JJUS 5376 and JJUS 5394.

JJUS 5397 Policy Analysis and Progam Evaluation: 3 semester hours.

Examines theories and methods of policy analysis and program evaluation relevant to juvenile justice agencies. Identifies the complex effects of policy change as well as techniques for developing a continuous capacity for program assessment in these agencies.

JJUS 5698 Thesis: 6 semester hours.

Independent and original research leading to an acceptable master's thesis.

JJUS 7165 Seminar in Professional Development: 1 semester hour.

One hour workshops intended to provide Ph.D. students with the key skills for engaging in professional activities in becoming successful professionals. The primary focus is on the presentation of topics and strategies for a successful career in higher education, establishing personal professional goals and meeting the demands of the profession (teaching, service and research).

JJUS 7311 Juv Just Issu Pract: 3 semester hours.

Includes the history of juvenile justice, an overview of juvenile justice agencies and process, and an introduction to issues and trends in the field of juvenile justice. Introduces major questions and problems within the field of juvenile justice and juvenile crime prevention.

JJUS 7363 Comparative Juvenile Justice Systems:A Cross Cultural Perspective: 3 semester hours.

The course presents comparative perspective juvenile justice systems in different countries, with special emphasis on legal traditions and processing of juveniles by police, courts, and correctional systems.

JJUS 7364 Management and Administration: 3 semester hours.

Examination of management and administrative thought and practice as these relate to public agencies and private organizations of juvenile justice and youth and child service.

JJUS 7365 Seminar on Juvenile Corrections: 3 semester hours.

Examination of juvenile corrections in Texas and the nation, including the Texas Youth Commission, the Texas Juvenile Probation Commission, county probation departments, juvenile parole, and private agencies. Discusses historical and national juvenile correctional trends.

JJUS 7367 The Juvenile Offender and Youth Gangs: 3 semester hours.

Explores the nature and extent of juvenile crime. Also considers the socialization of children, the creation of childhood and crime as social constructs, and the etiology of juvenile offending.

JJUS 7369 Qualitative Methods in Social Sciences: 3 semester hours.

Familiarizes students with the nature and utility of qualitative fieldwork in various areas of criminological research, emphasizing areas of juvenile justice.

JJUS 7371 Special Topics in Juvenile Justice: 3 semester hours.

A seminar designed to allow flexibility in doctoral student degree plans and to promote awareness and understanding of issues in Juvenile justice as these develop.

JJUS 7374 Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Juvenile Justice: 3 semester hours.

This seminar provides a comprehensive examination of race and gender in the juvenile justice system. Theoretical perspectives and empirical research form the basis of the seminar. The course includes an examination of the intersection of gender and race and the underlying histrorical, social, economic, and cultural conditions that impact women and racial/ethnic minorities within the juvenile justice system.

JJUS 7376 Seminar on Juvenile Processing by Police and Courts: 3 semester hours.

Considers the processing of juvenile offenders by the juvenile justice system, with a special emphasis upon the juvenile offender's contacts with police officials and with the criminal courts. Compares and contrasts the processing of accused juveniles with the processing of accused adults.

JJUS 7378 Legal Aspects of Juvenile Justice: 3 semester hours.

Includes a study of the legal issues which commonly face administrators, managers, and employees of the juvenile justice system. Delves into public employment law, civil rights laws, and juvenile laws relating to the efficient functioning of agencies, and protections from lawsuits. Considers federal law and U. S. Supreme Court decisions relating to the legal rights of children as well as to the functioning of the juvenile justice system. Covers substantive and procedural issues relating to juvenile crime and delinquency. Compares and contrasts legal factors relating to juveniles with those relating to adults.

JJUS 7385 Prevention and Treatment of Crime and Delinquency: 3 semester hours.

Exploration and explanation of the theoretical development of juvenile crime prevention and treatment. The historical growth of juvenile crime prevention and models of juvenile crime control, community action programs, mentoring programs, and technology systems are examples of topics treated.

JJUS 7386 Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation: 3 semester hours.

Explores theories and methods of organizational change with suggested applications to agencies and organizations related to the juvenile justice and criminal justice systems. Identifies methods of developing a continuous capacity for change in juvenile justice and criminal justice agencies. Discusses evaluation methodologies.

JJUS 7388 Youth Victimization: 3 semester hours.

This seminar provides a comprehensive examination of youth victimization. Theoretical perspectives and empirical research for the basis of the seminar's exploration of emerging issues related to youth victimization and maltreatment. The history, theoretical explanations, risk factors, types of youth victimizations well as the consequences of maltreatment and victimization will be critically assessed. The course will also include an evaluation of the current responses to youth victimization.

JJUS 7389 Advanced Seminar in Crime and Delinquency Theory: 3 semester hours.

Emphasizes analytical, critical evaluation of theory, particularly contemporary versions. Assumes that the student is knowledgeable of each of the major arguments for the causes and correlates of crime. Theory development, theory integration and techniques of theory construction will be examined.

JJUS 7392 Advanced Research Methods I: 3 semester hours.

Examines research designs most useful to juvenile justice problems. The primary focus is on quasi-experimental and survey methodologies, with discussion of data collection methods and construction of questionnaires, as well as validity and reliability.
Prerequisites: JJUS 5943 or JJUS 5394.

JJUS 7395 Advanced Research Methods II: 3 semester hours.

Examines research design problems in juvenile justice at an advanced level; use of sophisticated classical research designs and data-gathering techniques; analysis of problems related to sampling theory and procedures; application of mathematical models to problems in research design and analysis; use of techniques permitting causal inferences.
Prerequisites: JJUS 7392 and JJUS 7396.

JJUS 7396 Advanced Statistical Techniques I: 3 semester hours.

Discusses nonparametric and parametric statistical techniques including various ordinal tests, multiple regression, logistic regression, discriminate analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, canonical correlation, factor analysis, cluster analysis, and multidimensional scaling.
Prerequisites: JJUS 5396 or JJUS 5963.

JJUS 7397 Advanced Statistical Techniques II: 3 semester hours.

Includes a survey of reliability analysis, log linear, and log it log linear analysis, nonlinear, weighted and two stage least-squares regression, profit analysis, time-series and survival analysis, and Cox regression.
Prerequisites: JJUS 7396.

JJUS 7399 Independent Study: 1 semester hour.

Readings, research and/or field work on selected topics.

JJUS 8391 Dissertation I: 3 semester hours.

Independent and original research leading to an acceptable doctoral dissertation. May be repeated.

JJUS 8392 Dissertation II: 3 semester hours.

Independent and original research leading to an acceptable doctoral dissertation. May be repeated.
Prerequisites: JJUS 8391 or JJUS 8913.

JJUS 8393 Dissertation III: 3 semester hours.

Independent and original research leading to an acceptable doctoral dissertation. May be repeated.
Prerequisites: JJUS 8392 (may be taken concurrently) or JJUS 8923 (may be taken concurrently).

JJUS 8394 Dissertation IV: 3 semester hours.

Independent and original research leading to an acceptable doctoral dissertation. May be repeated.
Prerequisites: JJUS 8393 (may be taken concurrently) or JJUS 8933 (may be taken concurrently).