History (HIST)

Courses

HIST 1313 U.S. to 1876: 3 semester hours.

This course covers American development from the era of discovery to the close of the Civil War. This course includes modules on the following topics: the colonial era; the young republic; westward expansion; and sectionalism; Civil War, and Reconstruction.
Prerequisites: RDNG 0131.

HIST 1323 U.S. 1876 to Present: 3 semester hours.

Surveys modern American development: the industrial nation and its problems; expansionist and muckraker; the First Crusade, Normalcy and Reaction, Depression, and the New Deal; and the Second World War and after. Lectures, special readings, discussion, supervised study, and tests.

HIST 1333 History of Texas: 3 semester hours.

Survey of Texas from Spanish colonization to the present. Emphasis will be placed on contributions made to the state of Texas by various ethnic groups.

HIST 1813 World Civilization to 1500: 3 semester hours.

Survey of the ancient world from the dawn of civilization in Egypt, Mesopotamia, China, India and Mesoamerica through the Middle Ages in Europe. Attention is given to political, social and economic institutions as well as art, literature and religion.

HIST 1823 World Civilization since 1500: 3 semester hours.

Survey of key developments in Western and non-Western civilizations from the Renaissance in Europe to the present. Special emphasis is placed on religious expansion and conflict, militarism, intellectual and political revolutions, formation of modern national-states, and colonialism and post colonialism.

HIST 2003 Intro to Historical Methods: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed to introduce students to the historical profession, with emphasis on research methods, historical analysis and writing, and career paths for historians.

HIST 2203 Military History: 3 semester hours.

Military History - Past Wars, conflicts and study of war heroes.

HIST 2813 African-American History: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the history of persons of African descent on the North American continent from the settlement of Jamestown to present. Integral to students' exposure to African-American History will be their exposure to basic research methods and writing techniques. Students should be prepared to examine major issues and historical events including, but not limited to: the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, the black presence in Colonial America, the development of chattel slavery, Abolitionism, Emancipation, Jim Crow, the Nadir, the Great Migration, the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights Movement, and Black Power Era.

HIST 3013 Introduction to Public History: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the role of historical memory in shaping our understanding of the past through examining the history of museums, archives, and historical research centers. Students will be introduced to the practices, theories and various sectors of public history, and will utilize an interdisciplinary approach in documenting, preserving and curating history.

HIST 3153 Ancient Egypt & the Near East: 3 semester hours.

An advanced survey of the civilizations of ancient Egypt and the Near East(Middle East). Students will read primary sources in translation and analyze the developments and interactions of ancient Assyrian, Babylonian, Egyptian, Hebrew, Hittite, Persian, and Sumerian civilizations.

HIST 3163 Ancient Greece: 3 semester hours.

An advanced survey of ancient Greece, tracing the developments of the cultural, political, intellectual, and artistic achievements of Greek civilization from the Bronze Age through the conquest of Macedonia. Students will read primary sources in translation and analyze important Greek personalities and events, as well as methods and problems of historical interpretation.

HIST 3173 Ancient Rome: 3 semester hours.

An advanced survey of ancient Rome, tracing the developments of the cultural, political, intellectual, and artistic achievements of Roman civilization from the foundation of the City, through Kingdom, Republic, and Empire, to the fifth century A.D. Students will read primary sources in translation and analyze important Roman personalities and events as well as methods and problems of of historical interpretation.

HIST 3183 Medieval Europe: 3 semester hours.

An advanced survey of political, social, economic, and cultural developments of European civilizations from the end of the Roman Empire to the dawn of the fifteenth-century Renaissance. Students will read primary courses in translation and analyze medieval personalities and events, as well as methods and problems of historical interpretation.

HIST 3223 Women in History: 3 semester hours.

A survey of selected issues related to the historical status of women in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas, with emphasis on African-American women in the United States since slavery.

HIST 3323 Contemporary United States: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of the emergence of the United States as a modern nation and examination of the changing United States' social, political, economic, cultural and diplomatic scene with emphasis on the progressive trends, 1900 - Present.

HIST 3503 American Chattel Slavery: 3 semester hours.

This course examines the development of slavery in the making of American society, and particularly the American South, from the early colonial period through Reconstruction. Attention will be given to the following topics: the Atlantic origins of slavery; the emergence of colonial plantation societies; the development of a distinct slave society within the plantation; and the causes and consequences of secession (Civil War and Reconstruction). Finally, we will consider Southern life in the aftermath of emancipation and the establishment of Jim Crow racial segregation in the revival of antebellum racial ideologies.

HIST 3533 Civil Rights Movement: 3 semester hours.

This course focuses on America's Second Reconstruction, The Civil Rights Movement that ran throughout the entirety of the twentieth century. Students will engage materials that highlight the impact that the Civil Rights Movement had on the citizenship status of African-Americans. Major historical events and individuals covered include, but are not limited to: The Great Migration, the founding of the NAACP, Charles Hamilton Houston, ASA Philip Randolph, the March on Washington Movement, the Civil Rights Movement, Charles Hamilton Houston, Thurgood Marshall, Bayard Rustin, Martin Luther King, Jr., Linda Brown, Malcolm X, the Murder of Emmett Louis Till, Jackie Robinson, The Black Panther Party for Self-Defense, The Rise of Black Power, Affirmative Action, the rise of the Prison Industrial Complex, and the election of Barack Hussein Obama.

HIST 3603 Atlantic World: 3 semester hours.

This course analyzes the exploration/colonization of the Atlantic Basin, the genesis of slave societies in the Western Hemisphere, and the social, political, and economic legacies of colonial regimes in the Americas and along the western coast of Africa from 1400 to 1900. This course utilizes power, gender, race, and class as categories of analysis to bring light to understanding this region.

HIST 3613 Colonial Latin Amer & Carrib: 3 semester hours.

An advanced survey of Latin American and Caribbean histories and cultures. Special emphasis on colonization, slavery, and emancipation and independence movements particularly in connection to contemporary social, economic, and political issues impacting the region. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach, the art, music, geography and literature of the regions will also be explored.

HIST 3703 Pre-Colonial Africa: 3 semester hours.

Study of African history before the arrival of the Europeans that examines the growth and evolution of political, social, and economic institutions of various African countries. Special attention will be given to the western portion of Africa (Ghana, Mali, and Songhay) and areas south of the Sahara.

HIST 3713 Post-Colonial African History: 3 semester hours.

Survey of African History since the end of the Second World War (1945); events and issues leading up to independence; efforts at nation-building; problems of political instability and economic development.

HIST 3753 African Diaspora: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the people of African descent. Students will explore origins on the continent of Africa, the places blacks were dispersed to as a result of the slave trade, emancipation movements across the globe, and the movements for black equality around the world. The course also examines the musical, artistic, literary, and cultural contributions of people of African descent.

HIST 3993 Independent Study: 1-3 semester hour.

Readings, research, and/or field work on selected topics.

HIST 4053 Early Christianity: 3 semester hours.

An exploration of early Christianity from its emergence within Second-Temple Judaism to its spread and influence within the Roman world to the fourth century AD. Students will read primary sources in translation and analyze the development of the Church as an institution and community, issues of Christian doctrine and discipline, as well as methods and problems of historical interpretation.

HIST 4313 Foreign Relations: 3 semester hours.

Diplomatic history of the United States covering the following: the colonial background and the emergence of the cardinal principles of American foreign policy and its mechanics through the revolutionary and early national periods, the New Nationalism, Manifest Destiny and Westward Expansion, Civil War diplomacy, and projections abroad. Lectures, book reports, forums, and research projects.

HIST 4443 Special Topics: 3 semester hours.

This course focuses on specific historical topics that the professor deems appropriate and student's desire. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

HIST 4813 African-American Hist to 1876: 3 semester hours.

Intensive readings in a broad range of texts that form the foundation of the African-American historical experience. Students will deal with readings that cover an expansive time frame ranging from the colonization of Africa through the ending of the American Reconstruction. This course will provide students an opportunity to read seminal texts by scholars who have written about the African-American experience. Major issues and historical figures covered: the colonization of Africa, the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, American chattel slavery, Black Abolitionism, Frederick Douglass, Nat Turner, Linda Brent, Harriet Tubman, Sojourner Truth, the Underground Railroad, Emancipation, and the Reconstruction era.

HIST 4823 African-Amer Hist Since 1876: 3 semester hours.

Intensive readings in a broad range of texts that form the foundation of the African-American historical experience during the modern period. Students will deal with readings covering a period that extends from the Nadir through contemporary America.This course will provide students an opportunity to read seminal texts by scholars who have written about the post-slavery African-American experience. Major issues and historical figures covered include, but are not limited to: the Nadir, Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, The Great Migration, The Harlem Renaissance, the March on Washington Movement, the Civil Rights Movement, the Murder of Emmett Louis Till, Malcolm X, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense, the decline of Urban America, the rise of the Prison Industrial Complex, and the election of Barack Hussein Obama.

HIST 4903 Senior Seminar: 3 semester hours.

Advanced training in historical methods and historiography designed to measure student's understanding and mastery of the discipline.

HIST 4951 TExES Prep-Hist/Soc Studies: 1 semester hour.

This course is designed to help students prepare to take the Texas Examination of Educator Standards(TExES) in History/Social Studies. This course is typically taken the semester before Student Teaching, or during the senior year for those who are doing alternative certification.

HIST 4993 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research, and/or field work on selected topics.