College of Nursing

http://www.pvamu.edu/nursing

Mission Statement

The faculty of the College of Nursing at Prairie View A&M University embraces the University's mission of excellence in education, research and service. The purpose of the College of Nursing is to prepare beginning professionals as nurse generalists (BSN); and graduate prepared nurses with an area of specialization (MSN), and/or a doctoral prepared (DNP) expert clinical practice scholar, all of whom have foundations for continuing personal, professional and educational growth. Graduates are prepared to practice in a variety of settings and to assume leadership roles as socially responsible and accountable professionals in response to the health needs of a rapidly changing, technologically complex society.

Philosophy

The philosophy of the Prairie View A&M University College of Nursing reflects the beliefs of the faculty and provides the foundation for the curriculum. While striving to maintain effective teaching and a strong curriculum, the faculty believe their role includes the fostering of academic excellence and intellectual curiosity in students. The faculty believe in educating students of diverse ethnic, academic and socioeconomic backgrounds through professional role-modeling, mentoring relationships and the development of culturally sensitive paradigms for clinical practice. The faculty strive to foster commitment to values believed to be inherent in professional nursing: altruism, human dignity, truth, justice, freedom, equality and esthetics.

The faculty believe that learning is a life-long process which progresses along a continuum from simple recall of information, through comprehension, application, and synthesis of concepts, toward the creative use of new information and technology. Each student brings to the learning environment knowledge, values, attitudes and beliefs. Although the faculty facilitates learning by providing a receptive environment for students to use and expand their body of knowledge, the student must assume responsibility for the interactive learning process, which requires active participation of both the student and faculty.

Health is culturally and individually defined. The faculty believe that health is a dynamic state of integrated functioning/balance and purposeful direction within the internal and external environment to maximize one’s potential. The faculty believe that all human beings have a right to health care, including the increasing vulnerable populations who do not have complete access to health care.

In this rapidly changing society, health care delivery must also change to meet changing needs of consumers. The faculty believe that consumers are not merely passive recipients of health care services, but active participants in the decision-making process affecting their health. The faculty espouse a primary health care strategy, which encourages advocacy and partnerships with consumers in systematic efforts to identify and address major health needs. The faculty empower consumers to be self-reliant and competent in managing the health aspects of their lives.

Nursing has a caring and holistic role in the promotion, protection, and restoration of health for culturally diverse individuals, families, aggregates, communities, and society. The nurse in collaboration with clients and other health care providers, functions in a variety of roles and settings to provide effective care based upon a planned, deliberate decision making process. The nursing process serves as the method by which therapeutic interventions and decisions are implemented.

The faculty believe that community service is a vital component of nursing practice. Community service involves providing cultural sensitive primary health care, direct services, and educational information designed to promote and maintain healthy communities in rural and urban settings.

The faculty believe that research provides a foundation for analytical thinking and guides nursing practice. The baccalaureate graduate uses the research process in clinical problem solving and incorporates research findings into practice. Research at the undergraduate level provides a basis for continued study at the graduate level.

Professional nursing education is based upon a general liberal arts education with an emphasis on the behavioral and natural sciences. The ability to process information, problem-solve, make informed decisions and think critically are desired outcomes of nursing education. The professional nurse who can communicate effectively, intervene therapeutically, think critically, and is technologically competent will be uniquely valuable in the present and future health care system.

The outcome of baccalaureate education is to empower graduates to continually develop as contributing members of the nursing profession and of the larger society to practice in a variety of settings, to assume leadership roles in response to the health needs of a rapidly changing, complex society, and to practice nursing within a framework that encompasses legal, ethical, and professional standards. The graduates are prepared for entry into graduate nursing education to further develop their professional roles.

Building upon the broad generalist foundation of baccalaureate education in nursing, the faculty believe that graduate education in nursing consists of an advanced research-based specialized body of knowledge which is required to deliver high quality consumer-focused health care. The advanced practice nurse has specialized knowledge and skills sets in leadership and health care management. Also, there is understanding and appreciation of curriculum theory and development, and the ethical responsibility and accountability for safety, best practices, and competencies as evidenced for effectiveness in teaching and management of health care delivery.

The faculty further believe graduate education in nursing to be the most effective means of preparing nurses to deliver advanced culturally sensitive health care to diverse and vulnerable populations; to advance nursing’s research base by linking nursing theory to advanced clinical practice; and to advocate for continuous improvement in health care through the formulation and implementation of consumer-focused health policy and health legislation.

Instructional Organization

Program Degree Offered
NursingBSN
Nursing-Nursing AdministrationMSN
Nursing-Nursing PractitionerMSN
Nursing-Nurse EducationMSN
Nursing PracticeDNP

FINANCIAL AID 

Financial Aid Application Forms may be obtained from the following: 

College of Nursing                                           Office of Financial Aid
Prairie View A&M University                            Prairie View A&M University
6436 Fannin Street                                           P.O. Box 519  MS 1005
Houston, Texas  77030                                    Prairie View, Texas  77446

University’s website:  www.pvamu.edu.

Accreditation and Regulatory Agencies

The program is organized to meet and or exceed the requirements of regulatory and other agencies including, but not limited to: The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB), the Texas Board of Nursing (BON), the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN), the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), and the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF).

The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board
1200 E. Anderson Lane                     
P.O. Box 12788
Austin, TX 78711-2788
(512) 427-6101

http://www.thecb.state.tx.us/

The Texas Board of Nursing
333 Guadalupe, Ste. 3-460
Austin, TX 78701-3944
Office: (512) 305-7400
Fax:    (512) 305-7401

http://www.bon.texas.gov/

Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing
3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 850
Atlanta, GA 30326
Phone: (202) 887-6791
Fax: (202) 887-8476

http://www.aacn.nche.edu/ccne-accreditation

Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education
One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 530
Washington, DC 20036-1120
Phone: (202) 887-6791
Fax: (202) 887-8476

http://www.aacn.nche.edu/ccne-accreditation

National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties
1615 M. Street NW, Suite 270
Washington, DC 20036
tel: (202) 289-8044 
fax: (202) 289-8046

http://nonpf.com/ 

LICENSURE AS A REGISTERED NURSE 

Disciplinary and Licensure Proceedings.

Each nursing student will receive the following documents, regarding licensure eligibility and disciplinary rules for registered professional nurses: 

A. 217.11 Standards of Nursing Practice

217.12 Unprofessional Conduct

301.161 BON Authority to Establish Criminal Investigation

301.252 License Application

301.2511 Criminal History Record for License Applicants

Texas Board of Nursing, Nurse Practice Act. Amended September 2007. 

B. Declaratory Order Petition Request Form from the College of Nursing

Student Conduct Code and Handbook or from Texas Board of Nursing website:

www.bon.state.tx.uswww.bon.state.tx.us

Purpose and Goals

The purpose of the Baccalaureate Nursing Program is to prepare students for beginning professional practice as nurse generalists. Graduates are educated to meet community and state needs and assume leadership roles in the delivery of health care. As nurse generalists, graduates are prepared to assume beginning positions in any area of nursing practice and have the academic foundation for advanced study in nursing or related areas.

Core Performance Standards

The Prairie View A&M University College of Nursing has adopted the core performance standards associated with the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), Council on Collegiate Nursing Education (SCCEN), 2014 Common Core State Standards; Americans with Disablities Act (ADA); Title IX of the Education Amendment Act 1972; American Nurses Association, Code of Ethics for Nurses, 2008; American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice, 2008; The Essentials of Master's Education in Nursing; The Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice; 2006; Texas Board of Nursing Differentiated Essential Competencies (DECs), 2010 and the Standards for Advanced Practice in Nursing Education; the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties, (NONPF), Nurse Practitioner Core Competencies, 2012, and the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (qsen) - Pre-licensure and Graduates Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes, 2010; and Master's Level, 2012.

Baccalaureate Nursing Program

Admission Requirements Baccalaureate Nursing Program

A student seeking to declare a major in nursing must be admitted to the University through the Office of Admissions in accordance with the defined criteria for admission as outlined in the Prairie View A&M University Undergraduate Catalog . An acceptance letter for enrollment in the University does not guarantee a student’s acceptance and enrollment in the pre-nursing (lower division) or nursing program (upper division, clinical studies). Admission into the upper division clinical studies is a selective process.

Pre-Nursing Major (Lower Division) Baccalaureate Nursing Program

  • Unconditional Admission Requirements
    • High School GPA: 3.0 minimum
    • High School Mathematics: 4 years (must include Algebra I, II, and Geometry)
    • High School Science: 4 years (must include Biology, Chemistry, and Physics)
    • TSI Requirements met through testing (TSI, ACT, SAT, or listed alternative tests)

Any courses taken for dual credit, advance placement, or to satisfy college requirements will be applied appropriately. Applicants are advised to notify the PVAMU Office of Admissions to validate the transfer of pre-college and advanced placement credits.

Pre-Nursing Program Lower Division - Other Applicants

Admission to the Pre-Nursing Program (lower division) may be considered when the applicant satisfies the undergraduate admission requirements of the University and the College of Nursing as a freshman, sophomore or transfer student. In addition, students seeking admission as a pre-nursing major must also meet the following criteria:

  1. Satisfy all sections of TSI (Texas Success Initiative) or equivalent tests by achieving the scores as illustrated or be exempt as described below:

    TSI: Reading 351; Math 350; Writing 363 or essay;

    ACCUPLACER: Reading 78; Elementary Algebra 63; Written Essay 6; Sentence Skills 80;

    ASSETT: Reading 41; Algebra 38; Written Essay 6; Writing Skills 40;

    COMPASS: Reading 81; Algebra 39; Written Essay 6; Writing Skills 59.

    Exemption is based on the student’s performance on the following:
     
    Test Combined Verbal Math
    SAT (SAT SUBJECT TEST scores are not acceptable)1070500 (Minimum)500 (Minimum)
    ACT2319 (Minimum)19 (Minimum)
    TAKS3 Writing2200 ELA2200 Math

    SAT and ACT scores are valid for only five years from the date of testing and all requirements listed above must be met on the same test date. Exit level TAKS scores are valid for only three years from the date of testing and scores for exemption purposes must be satisfied on the first attempt of testing.

    Other possible exemptions may include:
    1. A student who has graduated with an associate or baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution of higher education.
    2. A student who is serving on active duty as a member of the Armed Forces of the United States, the Texas National Guard, or as a member of a reserve component of the Armed Forces of the United States and has been serving for at least three years preceding enrollment. A certified copy of orders or documentation showing length of service is required.
    3. A student who, on or after August 1, 1990 was honorably discharged, retired, or released from active duty as a member of a reserve component of the Armed Forces of the United States. A certified copy of the certificate of release is required.

      Note: The College of Nursing does not accept remedial courses to satisfy the THEA or other equivalent tests requirements in accordance with the Texas Success Initiative (TSI).
  2. Complete the pre-nursing (lower division) 60 required credit hours with a minimum 3.0 overall cumulative grade-point-average (GPA), and a minimum 3.0 GPA in support courses in the following areas: microbiology, anatomy and physiology, chemistry, sociology, psychology, nutrition, human development life span and statistics.

Pre-Nursing Program (Lower Division) Progression Requirements

The pre-nursing (lower division) program is designed to be completed in four academic semesters of full-time study. Students who have not completed the required pre-nursing (lower division) coursework totaling the 60 semester credit hours; satisfied the required grade point average (3.0 cumulative; 3.0 support area), and demonstrated satisfactory performance on the nursing entrance examination will be allowed one additional semester of study to meet the pre-nursing program requirements. Failure to meet the above requirements after one additional semester will result in the student’s ineligibility to continue as a pre-nursing major. It is advised that pre-nursing majors do not select a minor or a second major of study.

Withdrawal Policy for Pre-Nursing Program (Lower Division)

A student is allowed only two (2) withdrawals (W) from pre-nursing support courses. For example, a withdrawal from one course twice constitutes two (2) withdrawals; or withdrawal from two different courses constitutes two (2) withdrawals. A third withdrawal from any support course(s) will result in ineligibility to continue as a pre-nursing major.

A student who withdraws voluntarily from the pre-nursing major and the university in good academic standing is eligible for readmission as a pre-nursing (lower division) major, and is subject to the program requirements as listed in the latest edition of the PVAMU Undergraduate Catalog.

First Time, Freshman and Transfer Students

First time college students must satisfy the requirements for unconditional admission to pre- nursing major. Students who have completed satisfactorily less than two academic semesters are required to register through the University College (PVAMU Main Campus), which includes academic advising and other ongoing activities to support the student’s success as a pre-nursing major. After the completion of two academic semesters (freshman year of study), students are transferred to the Office of Pre-Nursing Advising (PVAMU Main Campus) for guidance in enrollment management and completion of the lower division.

Transfer students must submit an official transcript(s) of all previous college course work and grades to the Office of Pre-Nursing Advising and meet with a nursing advisor for transcript evaluation and eligibility for placement. Transfer students who have completed 45 or more credit hours of the lower division and plan to complete the remaining lower division requirements at another educational institution(s) must receive approval through the College of Nursing Office of Admissions and Student Services, Houston Center.

Change of Major

Students desiring to change their major to pre-nursing must meet with an academic advisor in the University College or the Office of Pre-Nursing Advising to complete a Change of Major Form prior to the early registration period. Likewise, the same procedure applies to a pre-nursing major seeking a change in academic study.

BACCALAUREATE NURSING PROGRAM 

(CLINICAL STUDIES UPPER DIVISION)

Applications for admission to the Baccalaureate Nursing Program (clinical studies upper division) are received in the spring and fall semesters to the Prairie View A&M University, Office of Student Services (Houston, transfer students) and Pre-Nursing Advising and Office of Admissions. Students must be fully admitted to the university before being considered for acceptance in the College of Nursing. Admission is competitive and on space availability. Deadlines for applications are March 1st for fall admission and September 1st for spring admission.

The College of Nursing, Houston Center is the primary site for the baccalaureate nursing program. Also, the College offers the baccalaureate program through distance education at the Northwest Houston Center and Prairie View A&M University (main campus, Prairie View, Texas). Only students accepted in the LVN-BSN and RN-BSN programs may enroll at the designated distance education locations.

Admissions Requirements (Clinical Studies Upper Division)

Admission to the clinical studies (upper division) may be considered when the applicant satisfies the undergraduate admission requirements of the University and the College of Nursing as Prairie View A&M University pre-nursing major or as a transfer student.  

Students seeking admission to clinical studies must meet the following criteria:

Complete the pre-nursing major (lower division) with a minimum 3.0 overall cumulative grade-point-average (GPA) and a minimum 3.0 GPA in support courses) in the following areas:  microbiology, anatomy and physiology, chemistry, psychology, nutrition, human development life span and statistics.

Completion of all natural science courses within the last 5 years of admission with a minimum grade of “C”:  anatomy and physiology, microbiology, and chemistry; and completion of all support courses within 10 years of admission: psychology, nutrition, human development life span, and statistics. 

The validation of dated credits and courses requiring updating is made upon receipt of a completed application to the College of Nursing. 

All lower division (core and support courses) classified as pre-nursing and the natural science courses may not be repeated more than once to achieve a passing grade of “C”.  Also, no more than two pre-nursing lower division courses may be repeated.

Satisfactory performance on a faculty selected pre-nursing admission examination, which may not be taken more than two times.  

Admission Procedures for Acceptance to Clinical Studies Upper Division

Note: Original lab work test results for blood tests and / titers must be submitted; dates and results of titers only is not accepted. The following documentation is required: 

  1. Submission of an application to the University through the Office of Undergraduate Admissions in accordance with the defined criteria for admissions as outlined in the Prairie View A&M University Undergraduate Catalog and the College of Nursing Office of Admissions and Student Services. An acceptance letter for enrollment in the University does not guarantee a student’s acceptance to the College of Nursing and enrollment in the baccalaureate nursing program clinical studies (upper division).
  2. Submission of documentation of having met the following health requirements:
    • Completed physical examination (must be repeated annually for continued enrollment in the nursing program)
    • Negative Tuberculin (TB) Mantoux skin test or negative chest x-ray (repeated annually)
    • Hepatitis B: Series of three immunizations OR titer (blood test) demonstrating immunity
    • Hepatitis C: Blood test for antibody OR Hepatitis panel OR Hepatitis C titer
    • MMR: Titer required (history of diseases: measles, mumps or rubella, or documentation of vaccinations not acceptable)
    • Varicella: Titer required (History of chicken pox not acceptable)
    • Meningococcal Vaccine (for students age 29 and under)
    • TDAP immunization
    • Flu shot (immunization between second week of August 1st and September 1; repeated annually)
  3. Submission of a current CPR certification only by the American Heart Association (Healthcare Provider Course).
  4. Negative criminal background check (TXBON) and drug screening test by a designated approved agency of the College of Nursing.  Students may be subjected to additional criminal background check and drug screening to satisfy continuing enrollment in the nursing program.
  5. Acquisition of the student professional liability insurance coverage by a designated approved agency of the University.
  6. Submission of a current health insurance card.

Verification of the applicant’s decision to accept the offer of admission to the nursing program must be received within two weeks from the date of offer for admission.  Final admission decisions are dependent on receipt of the completed application package; which includes a nursing processing fee and space availability.  Applicants not accepted for admission to the clinical studies upper division may be placed on a waiting list for the semester of application only. Applicants not admitted may reapply at the next admissions cycle.

Any student applying for transfer of courses from another baccalaureate nursing program must fulfill all requirements for admission to the University and the College of Nursing. Only nursing courses from a nationally accredited baccalaureate program may be considered for possible transfer credit and the student must be in good standing in the previous nursing program attended. Pass/Fail courses are not accepted.  Program placement is determined on an individual basis by the College of Nursing. 

Academic Progression (Clinical Studies Upper Division) 

To remain in good academic standing in clinical studies, a minimum grade of “C” must be achieved in all nursing studies courses.  A minimum 2.50 cumulative grade-point-average must be maintained for good standing in the nursing program. The grading scale for clinical studies is as follows:

Test Combined Verbal Math
SAT (SAT SUBJECT TEST scores are not acceptable)1070500 (Minimum)500 (Minimum)
ACT2319 (Minimum)19 (Minimum)
TAKS3 Writing2200 ELA2200 Math
TSI350

Satisfactory performance on a written medication proficiency examination given every semester (including summer sessions) must be achieved for eligibility for enrollment in clinical courses. Also, students must perform satisfactorily on semester standardized nursing achievement tests.

Good Academic Standing (Clinical Studies Upper Division) 

  • Achieve a grade of “C” (minimum 75%) in all nursing courses
  • Achieve satisfactory performance on semester medication proficiency examination with a minimum score of ninety-four per cent (94%)
  • Achieve satisfactory performance on standardized tests
  • Demonstrate professional and academic integrity

Withdrawal Policy for Clinical Studies (Upper Division) 

Students are allowed only two (2) withdrawals (W) from required nursing courses.  For example, a withdrawal from one course twice constitutes two (2) withdrawals; or a withdrawal from two different courses constitutes two (2) withdrawals.  Withdrawal from a course that is a companion to a co-requisite course will constitute one withdrawal if the grade is passing in one of the co-requisite courses.  A third withdrawal from any one or more required courses will result in dismissal from the nursing program. 

A student who withdraws voluntarily from clinical studies and is in good standing may be considered for readmission to the College of Nursing on an individual basis.

Academic Probation in Clinical Studies (Upper Division) 

Students in upper division clinical studies who fail to meet one or more of the requirements for good academic standing will be placed on academic probation in the College of Nursing. 

  • Failure in a nursing course
  • Withdrawal from two (2) nursing courses
  • Code of Conduct unbecoming to a student
  • Academic misconduct 

Students will receive notification of academic probation status through written communication, and copies will be sent to the students’ academic advisors. 

Students are allowed one failure and one opportunity to retake one nursing course only. 

Academic Misconduct 

A student may be suspended or dismissed from clinical studies upper division because of academic misconduct for any of the following reasons, but not limited to: 

  • Acts of dishonesty
  • Clinical practice performance beyond the role expectations of a student nurse
  • Falsification of credentials; plagiarism
  • Lack of professional integrity and conduct               

Dismissal from the College of Nursing 

A student will be dismissed from the College of Nursing for any of the following reasons, but not limited to: 

  • Failure in a second nursing course
  • Failure to achieve a minimum grade of “C” after repeating a required nursing course
  • Failure to achieve satisfactory performance on the College Comprehensive Examination
  • Third withdrawal from nursing courses
  • Unsafe clinical practice performance
  • Falsification of records in clinical performance
  • Code of Conduct unbecoming to a student as described in the College of Nursing Undergraduate Student Handbook and the Code of Student Conduct and Handbook.

Academic dismissal becomes effective in the semester of the infraction of the policy or immediately following the semester. 

Comprehensive Examination

Students enrolled in the Generic (Basic) and the LVN-BSN Programs are required to take the College Comprehensive Examination in the final semester of the nursing program of study.  Students must achieve a passing score on the examination as defined by the College of Nursing.  Below are the steps relating to the comprehensive examination:

  1. Students enrolled in NURS 4403, Nursing Process Seminar, are administered the Comprehensive Examination.  
  2. Students have two (2) chances to take the Comprehensive Examination during the semester:  one month after the onset of the semester (October or February); and one month prior to the end of the semester (November or April).
  3. Students must achieve a minimum standard score of 900 or higher on the Comprehensive Examination which accounts for 65% of the grade in NURS 4403.
  4. Students must achieve a minimum overall passing grade of “C” (75%) to pass NURS 4403.

Note:

  1. Students who fail to achieve the minimum overall passing grade of  “C” (75%)  in NURS 4403 and do not have any previous failure in a nursing course, are eligible to retake NURS 4403  (register and enroll) immediately in the subsequent semester, fall or spring (excluding summer session).
  2. Students who fail to achieve the minimum overall passing grade of  “C” (75%)  in NURS 4403 and do have a previous failure in a nursing course, are not eligible to continue enrollment and will be dismissed from the College of Nursing.

Readmission to the College of Nursing 

  1. A student in good standing who is not enrolled in the College of Nursing the subsequent semester must apply for readmission to the University and to the College of Nursing.  Placement of enrollment within the upper division clinical studies of the nursing major is determined on an individual basis and space availability.
  2. A student who has been dismissed from the College of Nursing may be considered for readmission to the nursing program not greater than two years after the date of dismissal.  Eligibility for consideration of readmission is determined by the current program standards.
  3. If readmission is granted, failure to meet the requirements for good academic standing in any semester and specifically, failure in one or more nursing courses will result in dismissal from the program and ineligibility for readmission in the future.

Graduation Requirements 

The College of Nursing adheres to all general requirements and procedures of the University for satisfying the criteria for graduation. In addition, students are eligible to apply for graduation when the following conditions are met: 

  • Completion of the required semester credit hours
  • Completion of the residency requirement of a minimum 64 semester hours of credit (upper division clinical studies) toward the BSN Degree earned at Prairie View A&M University. Achievement of a minimum 2.50 GPA
  • Completion of all clinical studies upper division courses within five years of the initial admission date
  • Satisfactory performance on comprehensive examinations selected, designed and score determined by the College of Nursing 

Application for Graduation 

The College of Nursing adheres to all general requirements and procedures of the University for satisfying the criteria for graduation.  In addition, students are eligible to apply for graduation when the following conditions are met: 

  1. Completion of the required semester credit hours
  2. Achievement of a minimum 2.50 cumulative GPA
  3. Completion of all clinical studies upper division courses within five years of the initial admission date
  4. Satisfactory performance on comprehensive examinations selected by the College of Nursing (generic/basic and LVN-BSN students only)

Student Nursing Organizations

National Student Nurses Association (NSNA). Membership is opened to pre-clinical (lower division) and nursing majors (upper division). The chapter is a member of the Texas Student Nurses Association and the National Student Nurses Association. The Prairie View A&M University Chapter of the Texas Student Nurses Association affords opportunities to meet other student nurses in Texas and the nation, promotes interschool affairs, interests and awareness of professional nursing organizations, and prepares students for participation in these organizations and future leadership roles.

Chi Eta Phi Sorority. Upper Division, clinical studies student nurses may apply for membership in Zeta Chi Beta Chapter of Chi Eta Phi Sorority. The principal goal of the sorority is to promote scholarship, leadership, and the delivery of health care through participation in civic, community, and health-related activities.

Sigma Theta Tau, International Honor Society. Eta Delta is the chartered Prairie View A&M University chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society for Nursing. The honor society recognizes superior achievement, leadership, innovation, and professional standards. Membership is by invitation, upper division clinical studies.

American Red Cross. Membership is open to all students enrolled in upper division clinical studies and serves as an extension of the Houston Chapter of the American Red Cross. The chapter provides volunteer nursing and health service to the College of Nursing, university, and the community-at-large; provides an auxiliary source of learning for student nurses; and promotes professional development and commitment to community service.

The American Assembly for Men In Nursing (AAMN). Membership is open to the male student nurses enrolled in the College of Nursing upper division clinical studies. The purpose of AAMN is to provide a framework for nurses as a group to meet, discuss, and influence factors which affect men as nurses.

Prairie View A&M International Student Nursing Organization (PVISNO). Membership is opened to all students enrolled in the College of Nursing upper division clinical studies. The organization promotes peer mentoring and community service while enhancing understanding and appreciation of other cultures. Members of this organization must also be a member of NSNA.

Degree Program Requirements

Bachelor of Science in Nursing with a major in Nursing and a Generic concentration Degree Program Requirements

Core Courses42
All Nursing Core Curriculum requirements are shown in the suggested degree program.
Support Area Requirements *(16 SCH)
HDFM 2553Human Development: Life Span3
HUSC 1343Ecology of Human Nutrition and Food3
PSYC 2613Fundamental of Statistics3
CHEM 1053Introduction to General Chemistry3
CHEM 1051General Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory1
BIOL 1073General Microbiology3
Major Requirements (64 SCH)
NURS 3003Introduction to Pharmacology3
NURS 3013Individual Health Assessment3
NURS 3023Basic Pathophysiology3
NURS 3164Basic Concepts of Nursing4
NURS 3263Basic Concepts of Nursing Practicum3
NURS 3174Adult Health Nursing I4
NURS 3273Adult Health Nursing I Practicum3
NURS 3185Family Health Nursing5
NURS 3284Family Health Nursing Practicum4
NURS 4013Introduction to the Research Process3
NURS 4163Mental Health Nursing3
NURS 4262Mental Health Nursing Practicum2
NURS 4173Community Health Nursing3
NURS 4272Community Health Nursing Practicum2
NURS 4183Adult Health Nursing II3
NURS 4282Adult Health Nursing II Practicum2
NURS 4193Nursing Leadership and Management3
NURS 4292Nursing Leadership and Management Practicum2
NURS 4403Nursing Process Seminar3
Nursing Electives6
Total Hours122

LVN-BSN Concentration

DISTANCE EDUCATION PROGRAM

Licensed Vocational Nurses (LVNs) who seek admission to the LVN-BSN Program must meet the same lower division requisites and degree requirements as generic students.  Applicants are evaluated on an individual basis and must complete the upper division clinical studies within five years of the initial admission date.

Application Process:

  1. Be a graduate of an accredited Texas or out-of-state vocational technical or a community college program with a 3.0 GPA.
  2. Current license to practice as a LVN in Texas.
  3. Complete 60 prerequisite transferrable college-level hours (45 hours to apply) with less than 2 repeated courses.
  4. Meet the required 3.0 Cumulative GPA and Support Area GPA on a 4.0 scale
  5. Fulfill Texas Success Initiative (TSI) requirements.  Test scores displayed on Transcript.
  6. Complete State of Texas Common Application and print a copy.
  7. Submit non-refundable $25.00 application fee to the Main Campus – Office of Admissions and Records online or by mail, and keep a copy of receipt.
  8. Request official transcripts from all institutions attended to be sent to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions.
  9. Satisfactory performance on the pre-nursing entrance examination.  Two attempts are permitted.
  10. Submit completed application, diploma, license, practice experience and any current transcripts to the College of Nursing by March 1 (fall) and September 1(spring) admission.

Negative criminal background check and drug screening test by the TXBON and a designated approved agency of the College of Nursing.  Students may be subjected to additional criminal background check and drug screening to satisfy continuing enrollment in the nursing program.

Process for Advanced Placement

  1. Upon admission to the LVN-BSN program, students may qualify for seven (7) hours of advanced placement through credit by examinations.
  2. Advanced placement is achieved by obtaining a required performance score on two tests which may not be taken more than twice

                      - National League for Nursing Acceleration Challenge Exams (ACE):

                   A.         Care of the Adult Client

                   B.         Clinical Pharmacology

               3.  Upon successful completion of the above examinations, the student will receive 7 credit hours for the following nursing courses: Introduction to Pharmacology, Adult Health Nursing I Theory and Adult Health Nursing I Practicum. After satisfactory completion of the first 11 credit hours of the program, and the student is awarded 10 semester credit hours in nursing courses congruent with the Texas Articulation Model.  A total of 17 semester credit hours are given for advanced placement.

Graduation Requirements

The College of Nursing adheres to all general requirements and procedures of the University for satisfying the criteria of the Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing. In addition, students are eligible to apply for graduation when the following conditions are met:

Completion of the required semester credit hours.

  • Completion of the residency requirement of a minimum 49 semester credit hours (upper division clinical studies) toward the BSN Degree earned at Prairie View A&M University.
  • Achievement of a minimum 2.50 GPA.
  • Completion of all clinical studies upper division courses within five years of the initial admission date
  • Satisfactory performance on a comprehensive examination selected, designed and score determined by the College of Nursing.

The LVN-BSN Program is offered via distance education at three College of Nursing sites: Houston Center; and The Northwest Houston Center. Scheduling of courses per semester at distance sites are regulated based on enrollment management.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing with a major in Nursing and a LVN-BSN concentration Degree Program Requirements

Core Curriculum42
All Nursing Core Curriculum requirements are shown in the suggested degree program.
Support Area Requirements (16 SCH)
HDFM 2553Human Development: Life Span3
HUSC 1343Ecology of Human Nutrition and Food3
PSYC 2613Fundamental of Statistics3
CHEM 1053Introduction to General Chemistry3
CHEM 1051General Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory1
BIOL 1073General Microbiology3
Advanced Placement Articulation10
Credit Examination7
Major Requirements (49 SCH)
NURS 3005Transition to Professional Nursing5
NURS 3013Individual Health Assessment3
NURS 3023Basic Pathophysiology3
NURS 3185Family Health Nursing5
NURS 3284Family Health Nursing Practicum4
NURS 4013Introduction to the Research Process3
NURS 4163Mental Health Nursing3
NURS 4262Mental Health Nursing Practicum2
NURS 4183Adult Health Nursing II3
NURS 4282Adult Health Nursing II Practicum2
NURS 4173Community Health Nursing3
NURS 4272Community Health Nursing Practicum2
NURS 4193Nursing Leadership and Management3
NURS 4292Nursing Leadership and Management Practicum2
NURS 4403Nursing Process Seminar3
Nursing Electives3
Total Hours124

RN-BSN Concentration

DISTANCE EDUCATION ONLINE PROGRAM

Registered nurses who seek admission to the RN-BSN Program must meet the same prerequisites and degree requirements as all baccaulaureate nursing students. Applicants are evaluated on an individual basis and must complete RN-BSN Program within five years of the initial enrollment date.

The RN-BSN Program is offered online. Scheduling of courses per semester is based on an adequate class size.

Note: RN students who cannot enroll in online courses will be accomodated.

Admissions requirements: 

  • Be a graduate of a nursing diploma or associate degree program, which is accredited by the ACEN (Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing) for preparing registered nurses.
  • Hold current license as a registered nurse in the State of Texas or application for licensure in progress to the Texas Board of Nursing.
  • Completion of requisite lower division courses (60 credit hours), including core and support courses with a minimum grade of “C” per course and a cumulative grade-point-average of 3.00.
  • Documentation of recent nursing practice experience of at least 6 months full-time or one year part-time or a refresher course with a clinical component within the last two years.
  • Negative criminal background check by TX Board of Nursing and drug screening test by a designated approved agency of the College of Nursing.  Students may be subjected to additional criminal background check and drug screening to satisfy continuing enrollment in the nursing program.

Advanced Placement Eligibility and Articulation

1.   Upon admission to the RN-BSN program, students may qualify for thirty-six (36) hours of advanced placement and articulation  congruent with the Texas Articulation Model – NURS 3164, 3263, 3003, 3174, 3273, 3185, 3284, 4163, 4262, 4183, 4282 awarded toward the Bachelor of Science Nursing Degree.

Graduation Requirements 

The College of Nursing adheres to all general requirements and procedures of the University for satisfying the criteria for graduation. In addition, students are eligible to apply for graduation when the following conditions are met:

  • Completion of the required semester credit hours for the BSN, 124 credits.
  • Completion of the residency requirement of a minimum 28 semester hours of credit (upper division clinical studies) toward the BSN Degree earned at Prairie View A&M University.
  • Achievement of a minimum 2.50 GPA
  • Completion of all clinical studies upper division courses within five years of the initial admission date

Bachelor of Science in Nursing with a major in Nursing and a RN-BSN concentration 

Core Curriculum42
All Nursing Core Curriculum Requirements are shown in the suggested degree program.
Support Area Requirements (16 SCH)
HDFM 2553Human Development: Life Span3
HUSC 1343Ecology of Human Nutrition and Food3
PSYC 2613Fundamental of Statistics3
CHEM 1053Introduction to General Chemistry3
CHEM 1051General Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory1
BIOL 1073General Microbiology3
Advanced Placement Articulation36
Major Requirements (28 SCH)
NURS 4003Concepts of Professional Nursing Practice3
NURS 3013Individual Health Assessment3
NURS 3023Basic Pathophysiology3
NURS 4013Introduction to the Research Process3
NURS 4173Community Health Nursing3
NURS 4193Nursing Leadership and Management3
NURS 4272Community Health Nursing Practicum2
NURS 4292Nursing Leadership and Management Practicum2
Nursing Electives (2)6
Total Hours122

Applicants to the RN-BSN program have the option of taking 6 credit hours of graduate courses towards the MSN degree in Nurse Education; Nurse Administration; and Family Nurse Practitioner. The six credit hours of courses must be approved by the dual undergraduate (BSN) and graduate (MSN) program advisors.

  • NURS 5003 Transcultural Family; NURS 5033 Advanced Pathophysiology; NURS 5023 Advanced Pharmacology; NURS 5243 Advanced Health Assessment; CNSL 5093 Educational Statistics

Distance Education Programs

The central purpose of Distance Education at Prairie View A&M University is the elimination of geographical distance and time as barriers to access to quality courses and programs. Current course offerings include education, agriculture, sociology, engineering, social work, English, Spanish, speech, business, juvenile justice, health, architecture, and nursing.

As a support service for the academic enterprise, Distance Education works collaboratively across the university community to:

  • Electronically extend the campus of Prairie View A&M University through the NORTHSTAR and TTVN Telecommunications Networks for video delivery and WebCT through eCourses for online course delivery.
  • Provide an open learning environment where teaching and learning occur anytime and anyplace.
  • Share the practical applications of the university's knowledge and expertise to benefit society and support the economic growth and vitality of the local community.
  • Provide training for faculty and staff involvement in Distance Learning.
  • Increase Prairie View A&M University's access to the world and the world's access to the University.
  • Research Distance Learning environments and emerging academic technologies.

Distance Education and eCourses are listed in the Schedule of Classes and may also be accessed through Panther Tracks.

Approved Programs:

BSN in Nursing with a LVN-BSN concentration Program

BSN in Nursing with a RN-BSN concentration Program

MSN- Family Nurse Practitioner

MSN - Nurse Education

MSN- Nurse Administration

Master of Science in Nursing Degree Program

Program Objectives

The program objectives are designed to accomplish a Master of Science Degree through three degree programs: Family Nurse Practitioner, Nurse Education and Nurse Administration. Upon completion of the program, the graduate is prepared to:

  • Use evidenced-based research to enhance nursing practice and promote healthy communities and diverse populations.
  • Collaborate with others to influence the social, political and economic trends in health care delivery and health policy.
  • Analyze ethical, legal, and professional standards within the health care system.
  • Incorporate professional values, accountability, and responsibility into advanced nursing practice, education and administration.
  • Integrate knowledge, theories and professional standards of nursing and related disciplines into advanced nursing roles.
  • Demonstrate competency in an advanced nursing role in serving a cultural, ethical and technological diverse society.
  • Deliver specialized care to culturally diverse populations through health promotion, disease prevention and health maintenance activities.

Degree Offerings

Master of Science (MSN) Family Nurse Practitioner

Program Outcomes MSN

The Family Nurse Practitioner degree prepares advanced-practice nurses to provide primary health care to clients, families and communities. Students take core and advanced courses covering theoretical foundations for nursing practice, advanced pathophysiology, advanced pharmacology, nursing research and advanced health assessment. Nurse practitioner specialty courses emphasize the care of women and children, adult, and geriatric patients and their families. The total number of credit hours required is 53, which includes 780 hours of clinical practice. The curriculum consists of 15 semester hours of core content, 11 semester hours of advanced practice core content, 21 semester hours of nurse practitioner specialty content, and 6 semester hours of either thesis or non-thesis option. Clinical experiences occur in urban and rural settings. This course of study prepares nurses to take the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Family Nurse Practitioner Certification Examination or the American Academy of Nurse Practitioner Certification Examination.

Family Nurse Practitioner Outcomes:

  •  Interpret research findings to implement evidence based nursing practice.
  • Appraise nursing and non-nursing theories to use in advance nursing practice.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the policy making process as it influences self, the profession and health care system.
  • Integrate ethical decision-making theories into professional practice.
  • Apply knowledge and skills that are essential for advanced nursing practice in a variety of settings and the emerging health care system.
  • Develop an appreciation for human diversity in all clients and health care environments.
  • Formulate health promotion and disease prevention strategies that empower clients to maintain health and healthy lifestyles.
  • Incorporate professional values, accountability, and responsibility into advanced practice nursing.

Master of Science (MSN) Nurse Administration

The Nurse Administration degree prepares nurses to serve in a variety of leadership and managerial roles within the health care delivery system. The Nurse Administration curriculum consists of 15 semester hours of core content, 12 semester hours of nurse administration specialty content, 9 semester hours of electives in business or health informatics, or a combination, and 6 semester hours of either thesis or non-thesis option. Business courses provide the student the opportunity to learn business skills that further enhance their administrative backgrounds, where health informatics courses provide a background in the area of informatics. The course of study prepares nurses to take the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Certification Examination in Nursing Administration, Advanced.

Nurse Administration Outcomes:

  • Use an evidence-based approach in the management of client care and administration of health care services.
  • Engage in collaboration, negotiation and consensus building to effect change in health policy decision.
  • Evaluates personal-performance based on professional practice, standards, ethics, core values and organization criteria.
  • Examines organizational, managerial and leadership concepts that impact health care delivery systems.
  • Designs theory based strategies to resolve issues derived from dynamics that influence behaviors of individual groups.
  • Use knowledge of health care administration to advance nursing practice and provide quality health care services.

Master of Science (MSN) Nurse Education

The Nurse Education degree prepares nurses to teach in a variety of settings including the teaching of patients and their families, nursing students, nursing staff and health consumers. In the Nurse Education courses, students gain necessary teaching knowledge and skills to prepare them to become nurse educators, a complex role that requires both pedagogical and clinical competency. The nurse education track requires students to complete 15 semester hours of core content, 15 semester credit hours in Nurse Education courses, 9 semester hours in advanced practice core courses, and 6 semester hours of either a thesis or non-thesis option. Two Practicum courses are required: classroom and clinical instruction (120 contact hours each) for a total of 240 hours. This course of study prepares nurses to take the National League for Nursing Certified Nurse Education Examination.

Nurse Education Outcomes:

  • Use educational theories to design instructional strategies to achieve learning goals.
  • Design and develop curricular and educational programs.
  • Analyze the role of the nurse educator in preparing graduates for social, ethical, cultural and political issues which have an impact on nursing education.
  • Evaluate outcomes of the educational process in both the classroom and clinical setting.
  • Integrate technology based teaching strategies into curricular and educational programs.
  • Exhibit evidence of leadership, scholarship, research, and lifelong learning.
  • Assume the role of nursing educator in academia, health care institutions and the community.
  • Use teaching best practices, literature and research best practices to improve curricula.

Admission Requirements

The general policies relating to admission of graduate students to the College of Nursing are consistent with those of the Graduate School. Applicants applying for admission to graduate study must hold a baccalaureate degree in nursing from a program accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN) the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), hold a current license as a registered nurse in the State of Texas or have an application for licensure in progress and be employed as a professional nurse for at least two years.

The applicant must also meet the following criteria for admission for graduate study in the College of Nursing:

  1. Submit an application for admission and official transcripts covering all periods of enrollment in institutions of higher education to the Graduate School and the College of Nursing.
  2. Satisfactorily complete a basic statistics course and a health assessment course if not included in the BSN program.
  3. Possess a GPA of 2.75 on a 4.0 scale in the last 60 hours of coursework toward the undergraduate nursing degree and a minimum GPA of 3.0 (B average) in all prior graduate course work.
  4. Submit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores that are within ten (10) years.
  5. Submit three (3) letters of recommendation from professional nurses, one of which must be from a former nursing faculty.
  6. Present a current resume´ or curriculum vita.
  7. Verification of a negative criminal background check and drug screening tests.
  8. Complete an individual interview with graduate faculty/committee.
  9. Complete a satisfactory writing sample.

Post-Master's Certificate

A Post-Masters Certificate is offered for all degree options: Family Nurse Practitioner, Nurse Administration, and Nurse Education. The Post-Masters Certificate is designed for nurses who have a master’s degree in nursing and desire to complete a course of study leading to a national certification and/or program specialty. (see each degree option for specific courses).

Admission criteria:

  1. A master’s degree in nursing from an ACEN or CCNE accredited program
  2. Official transcripts covering all periods of enrollment in institutions of higher education.
  3. Current licensure as a registered nurse in the State of Texas or application for licensure in progress.
  4. A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (B average) in all prior graduate course work.
  5. Three (3) satisfactory professional nursing /academic letters of recommendation. One of which must be from a nursing faculty.
  6. A current resume or curriculum vita.
  7. Official documentation of a negative criminal background check and a drug screening test upon request.
  8. An interview is required of qualified applicants.

Applicants who are certified Nurse Practitioners seeking a Post-Master’s Certificate as a Family Nurse Practitioner will be considered on an individual basis. In addition the applicant must meet the following criteria:

  1. Must be recognized as a Nurse Practitioner in the State of Texas.
  2. Submit proof of employment as a Nurse Practitioner.

Health Requirements

A physical examination, negative TB skin test or chest x-ray, proof of measles, mumps and rubella immunity, varicella immunity TDAP (blood titer or evidence of immunizations) and Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C vaccination are required for admission to the master’s program. Verbal history of disease is not accepted as proof of immunity. An annual TB skin test or chest x-ray, flu shot as well as physical exam are required of each student.

Professional Liability Insurance and CPR Certifications

Professional liability insurance and current certifications in cardiopulmonary resuscitation are required (American Heart Association). Students must provide evidence of current adult and child CPR certification. Liability insurance is purchased at registration through course fees.

Background Check and Drug Screening Policy

All students to submit to a criminal background check and drug screening prior to enrollment. Failure to submit to the criminal background check and drug screening will immediately nullify admission and enrollment in the graduate nursing program.

The screening will be honored for the duration of the student’s matriculation except (a) when the student has a break in enrollment or (b) the student engages in acts of academic misconduct as illustrated in the College of Nursing Graduate Student Handbook and the Panther Planner Code of Student.

Types of Admission

The Graduate Nursing Program accepts students in four different types of admission categories.

Graduate Degree Status (Unconditional)

A student admitted to this category has met all requirements for full graduate degree status (completed application and payment of applicable fee, Bachelor of Science Nursing degree from an accredited college or university, official transcripts from all universities attended, letters of recommendation; official GRE scores, undergraduate GPA of at least 2.75 on a 4.0 scale in the last 60 hours of course work, and a GPA of at least 3.00 on a 4.00 scale in all prior graduate coursework.

Provisional Status

Students may be considered for admission as provisional graduate students and must meet the terms of the provision within the first 12 semester credit hours after admission. Grounds for provisional admission include: (1) a GPA of less than 2.75 on a 4.0 scale in the last 60 hours of course work; (2) graduated with a Bachelor of Science Degree from a nursing school that is not accredited by ACEN or CCNE; and/or, (3) have not yet completed the GRE examination.

In order to continue, the student must have achieved a GPA of 3.0 after one year of study and be recommended by the department and college for graduate degree status or non-degree status. Official scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) must be on file within the second semester of enrollment and may not be more than 10 years old at the time of enrollment. Failure to submit the GRE scores will result in an academic hold on registration.

Non-Degree (Transient) Status

A student who has a bachelor’s degree (minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75) and who wishes to take graduate courses without qualifying for a degree can be admitted as a Non-Degree (Transient) Student. Students must meet all course prerequisites in order to be admitted to advanced courses. Elevation to degree status must be recommended by the Director of Graduate Studies and approved by the Deans of the College of Nursing and Graduate School.

Special Student Status

Students who wish to take graduate courses but who do not meet the minimum GPA for admission as degree, provisional or non-degree status, are considered special students. Students may enroll in no more than 12 graduate semester credits covering a maximum of two consecutive terms and must achieve a 3.00 GPA.

Cancellation of Admission

Admission will be cancelled automatically if an applicant is accepted by the University for a given semester and does not register for that semester. If the applicant wishes to undertake work at the University at a later date, he/she must file a new application, pay a new application fee, and meet the current requirements for admission. Materials supporting the application for admission, such as transcripts and test scores are retained by the Office of Graduate Admissions for one year and may be used during this time to support the requirements associated with a new application.

Transfer of Credit

Graduate credit earned at another accredited institution, not exceeding six (6) semester hours, may be considered transfer and applied toward the master’s degree. Only courses with a grade of “B” or better may be considered for transfer. An “A” grade from another institution may not be used to validate a grade of “C” earned at Prairie View A&M University. An official transcript denoting the transfer course(s), year, and grade received must be on file in the Office of the Registrar before acceptance of transfer credit is official.

Prairie View A&M University will not consider credits from other institutions to meet requirements for a graduate degree unless the institution offering the courses will allow these credits to be applied toward the requirements of an advanced degree on its own campus. Under no circumstances will transfer course work be considered that will be more than six (6) years old at the time the degree is awarded.

Substitutions

Substitution of courses must be approved by the Department Head of the Graduate Nursing Program. In order for courses to be considered as a substitution they must be taken at Prairie View A&M University. When making this request, the student must make a “B” or better in the course and submit the course syllabus.

Time Limit on Work for Master’s Degree

A student must complete requirements for the degree within six consecutive years after the first date of enrollment in the Graduate School. Credit for individual courses completed in residence between six and seven years before all requirements for the master’s degree are completed may be validated by special examination given by the department concerned. Courses completed in extension or at another institution beyond the time limit cannot be validated. A course in which a grade of “C” was earned cannot be validated. A validated course is valid as credit toward the master’s degree only during the term in which it is validated.

Grading System for Graduate Nursing Students

Grade Description
A90 - 100
B81 - 89
C75 - 80
D65 - 74
FBelow 65
IIncomplete
IPIncomplete Passing
SSatisfactory (For Thesis Option Only)
WWithdrew Officially

Advisement/Registration

Students in the Graduate Nursing Program must be advised for each semester prior to registration. During the scheduled advisement session a student will complete a Registration Form for the semester. Both the advisor and student are required to sign this form. The Registration form also indicates that an advisement session was held with the student and there is agreement between both parties that the student will take the classes listed.

Progression

In order to successfully progress in the Graduate Nursing Program a student must remain in good standing. To remain in good standing a student must earn a grade of “B” or better in each course and maintain an overall GPA of 3.00.

Degree Plans

The student should file a degree plan within the first semester of matriculation in the university. Degree plan forms may be obtained by meeting with the major advisor. The major advisor, graduate program director, dean of the college and graduate dean review and approve the degree plan.

Admissions to Candidacy

The graduate student must complete the following minimum requirements to become a candidate for Master of Science Degree in Nursing:

  1. Submit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Scores that are within ten (10) years.
  2. Submit an official Application for Admission to Candidacy Form showing the applicant’s successful completion of 12 semester hours of required graduate courses with an average of “B” or better.
  3. Submit the application, to the Graduate Studies Director, Dean of the College of Nursing, and the Graduate School for final approval.

Change of Program/Major

Students who are in good academic standing with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher in all course work are eligible to begin the process to change from one degree program to another. The following steps are required before the change can be made. The student must:

  1. Consult the graduate major advisor in the proposed field of study.
  2. Request and receive a letter of recommendation from the Coordinator of the program that the student is leaving.
  3. File with the Graduate School an admission application, pay the application fee of $50.00, and submit three (3) letters of recommendation. One of the recommendations must come from the Coordinator of the program that the student is leaving.

Graduate students may not change programs or majors while on probation. If a student wants to be admitted to a different program (after the probation period), he/she must re-apply to the Graduate School through the accepting Graduate Advisor, Department head, and Academic Dean. The application will be subject to the approval of the Graduate School.

Concurrent Study for Two Different Degrees

A student pursuing a graduate degree program at Prairie View A&M University may not simultaneously enroll and complete course work for the purpose of meeting requirements for any other degree offered by this institution. Each degree must be completed in its entirety before work may be taken for the purpose of meeting requirements for a new degree.

Retention

In order to show satisfactory progress toward the masters degree in nursing, a student must meet the following criteria:

  • ŸMaintain a “B” average in all course work. A student who, in any two consecutive semesters or summer terms, has a cumulative grade point average below 3.00 is subject to academic dismissal upon recommendation of the Director of the Graduate Nursing Program to the Dean of the College of Nursing.
     
  • ŸAchieve a minimum grade of “B” in the Advanced Practice Core courses: Advanced Pathophysiology, Advanced Pharmacology, Advanced Health Assessment and all Specialty courses .
     
  • ŸA student may receive a grade of “I” (incomplete) in a course, under special circumstances and with the approval of the Dean, College of Nursing. The “I” must be removed before the end of one calendar year from the close of the term in which the grade was earned. This regulation does not apply to thesis and research credit courses but does apply to terminal project credit courses. A fee, payable to the registrar, is required for the change of grades.
     
  • ŸAn “IP”, in progress, is assigned to thesis and projects provided the student remains enrolled and makes satisfactory progress as certified by the committee chair, dean, and director of the graduate program. The time allotted for removal of the “IP” shall be the same as the maximum time for completion of a degree or certificate.
     
  • ŸA student must complete requirements for the degree within six consecutive years after the first date of enrollment for graduate study.
     
  • ŸA student who chooses to withdraw from the College of Nursing Graduate Studies for any reason prior to the completion of a semester or summer term after having registered for classes is required to comply with the official withdrawal procedure as defined in the catalog section, “Withdrawal from a Course and from the University.”

Criteria for Graduation

To obtain the Master of Science Degree in Nursing from Prairie View A&M University, the student must:

  1. File a degree plan with the Graduate School.
  2. Successfully complete the semester credit hours of required course work with an average of “B”. (Minimum "B" grade in all courses)
  3. Meet all the general requirements for graduation as outlined in the University’s Graduate Catalog.

A student will not graduate with a "C" grade in any Graduate Nursing course.

Application for Graduation

A student who plans to receive a degree from Prairie View A&M University must apply for graduation. Students are to apply by the published deadline available on the website for each graduation semester (fall, spring or summer). The application for graduation for any student submitted after the published deadline for that semester will be processed for graduation for the following semester.

To start the process, secure the application for graduation form from the Office of the Registrar’s webpage at www.pvamu.edu/registrar . Proceed to your academic department for appropriate approval/signatures. A fee is required as part of the application process and will be billed to the student at the time the approved application is submitted to the Office of the Registrar. Payment of the application fee is to be submitted to the Office of Treasury Services. Students that apply for graduation that are not enrolled for the term in which they plan to graduate will be charged an absentia fee. Finally, Students receiving financial aid must participate in the financial aid exit loan process and should visit the Office of Student Financial Aid for assistance.

Students who are indebted to the University will not be allowed to participate in the commencement exercises. The degree will be posted, if earned, but the transcript and diploma will be withheld until the debt is paid.

Withdrawal Policy

Students are allowed only TWO (2) withdrawals (W) from required nursing courses. For example, a withdrawal from one course twice constitutes TWO (2) withdrawals; or a withdrawal from two different courses constitutes TWO (2) withdrawals. Withdrawal from a course that is a companion to a co-requisite course will constitute ONE withdrawal if the grade is passing in one of the above courses. A third withdrawal from any one or more courses will result in DISMISSAL from the nursing program.

Re-Admission

An application for readmission to the Graduate School is required for an applicant or student in one of the following categories:

  1. An applicant who was previously admitted to the University but did not enroll in the term stated in the acceptance letter.
  2. A graduate student at Prairie View A&M University who was accepted into one degree program but wishes to enter another degree program.
  3. Degree candidates and non-degree students who have not enrolled in courses for two consecutive years.
  4. A graduate student who voluntarily withdraws from the university.

Note:

  • In the four cases mentioned above students/applications/degree candidates/non-degree students generally must complete and submit: Application, Fee of $50.00, and three (3) letters of recommendation.
  • Applications who have admitted to the program but did not enroll will not have to pay the application fee again if they desire to start the program within the academic year they have applied. The application fee originally sent is good for one academic year. Beyond one academic year and the application did not enroll they will be required to submit an entire application packet along with the fee of $50.00 for admission to the program.
  • A student who wants to change a major must also submit three (3) letters of recommendation and pay the application fee of $50.00. One of the recommendations must come from Coordinator of the program that the student is leaving.

Reactivation

Reactivation is a type of re-admission to the Graduate School. Continuing students who have sat out the program for no more than two (2) years and want to return must be reactivated into the university system. In addition, the student must be in good academic standing have no withdrawals from the last semester attended. This request must be made through the coordinator or academic advisor for completion.

Re-Evaluation of Credentials

Re-evaluation of credentials is a status change for students who were not accepted as graduate degree status (an unconditional acceptance). These are students who received a special acceptance or have been provisionally accepted into the program. Students must have their credentials re-evaluated before completing twelve (12) credit hours of course work. If a student was accepted with a GPA lower than 2.75: 12 credit hours will need to be completed, a GPA of 3.0 or better, and GRE Scores submitted (if this has not been submitted already). The request for re-evaluation of credentials must be submitted before the 12th class day for the semester desired for it to be applied as an official status change.

Probation

  1. Students are placed on probation when they have one or more of the following:
    1. Are admitted provisionally.
    2. Have a cumulative GPA of less than a 3.0 in a given term or semester.
    3. Receive a grade of “C” or below in any course.
  2. Students are allowed one opportunity to retake only one course in which a grade of "C" is earned.
  3. Students will receive written notification of the academic probation status.

Academic Dismissal

Students shall be dismissed from the master’s program for any one of the following reasons:

  1. A grade of “C” or below is received in any two courses or the same course twice.
  2. Failure to meet the provision(s) of probation.
  3. Failure to maintain a cumulative GPA of less than 3.0 in two consecutive terms or semesters.
  4. Academic and/or professional misconduct
  5. Third withdrawal from a course.

Grievance Appeals

A student who encounters problems arising from course matriculation's, advancement to candidacy, degree requirements, or general regulations should follow the academic appeal procedure that starts with the academic advisor. If a student wishes to appeal the decision, the Dean may refer the matter to an appeals panel for investigation and a recommended course of action. Appeals that move beyond the Dean, College of Nursing, should be referred to the Office of Graduate Programs who may refer the matter to the Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs.

Unresolved conflicts occurring within the student/faculty body which do not fall within the realm of the academic appeals process may be filed as a grievance. The grievance procedure is written in the university’s student handbook.

Master of Science in Nursing Degree Programs

MSN-Family Nurse Practitioner Degree Requirements

Core Courses
NURS 5003Transcultural Family Health Care in Rural and Urban Settings3
NURS 5013Theoretical Foundations of Nursing3
NURS 5133Clinical Research3
NURS 5713Health Policy3
CNSL 5093Educational Statistics3
Advanced Practice Core Courses 1
NURS 5042Role Theory and Ethics in Advanced Practice Nursing2
NURS 5163Advanced Pathophysiology for Advance Practice Nursing3
NURS 5173Advanced Pharmacology for Advance Practice Nursing3
NURS 5263Advanced Health Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning for Advanced Practice Nursing3
Nurse Practitioner Specialty Core Courses
NURS 5216Primary Health Care for the Childbearing/Childrearing Family with Practicum6
NURS 5245Primary Health Care for the Adult and Elderly with Practicum5
NURS 5257Management of Complex Health Problems7
NURS 5763Financial Management in Advanced Nursing Practice3
Select one of the following options:6
Thesis Option
Thesis Proposal Writing
Thesis
Non-Thesis Option
Research Capstone Project
One Elective Course
Total Hours53

Post-Master’s Certificate - Family Nurse Practitioner

Graduate Core Course
Advanced Practice Core Courses 1
NURS 5042Role Theory and Ethics in Advanced Practice Nursing2
NURS 5163Advanced Pathophysiology for Advance Practice Nursing3
NURS 5173Advanced Pharmacology for Advance Practice Nursing3
NURS 5263Advanced Health Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning for Advanced Practice Nursing3
Nurse Practitioner Specialty Courses
NURS 5216Primary Health Care for the Childbearing/Childrearing Family with Practicum6
NURS 5245Primary Health Care for the Adult and Elderly with Practicum5
NURS 5257Management of Complex Health Problems7
NURS 5763Financial Management in Advanced Nursing Practice3
Total Hours32
 
1

Advanced Practice Courses must be taken if not completed within the past 5 years. Transfer credits may be accepted for the Advanced Practice Courses. Nurses that are recognized as Advanced Practice Nurses are required to take the Nurse Practitioner Specialty Courses (20hrs).

MSN-Nurse Administration Degree Requirements

Core Courses
NURS 5003Transcultural Family Health Care in Rural and Urban Settings3
NURS 5013Theoretical Foundations of Nursing3
NURS 5133Clinical Research3
NURS 5713Health Policy3
Select one of the following3
Educational Statistics
Applied Statistical Methods and Computing
Nurse Administration Courses
NURS 5403ADM I-Organizational Theory3
NURS 5413ADM II-Healthcare Management3
NURS 5423ADM III-Healthcare Economics and Financial Management3
NURS 5433ADM IV - Nurse Administration Practicum3
Graduate Business or Health Informatics Electives9
Examples of Business courses include:
Select three of the following:
Concepts of Economic Analysis
Marketing Management
Organizational Behavior
Human Resource Management
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Examples of Health Informatics:
Health Informatics I
Health Informatics II
Health Informatics III
Select one of the following options:6
Thesis Option
Thesis Proposal Writing
Thesis
Non-Thesis Option
Research Capstone Project
One NURS Elective
Total Hours42

Post-Master’s Certificate - Nurse Administration

Nurse Administration Courses
NURS 5403ADM I-Organizational Theory3
NURS 5413ADM II-Healthcare Management3
NURS 5423ADM III-Healthcare Economics and Financial Management3
NURS 5433ADM IV - Nurse Administration Practicum3
Graduate Business Courses or Health Informatics Electives9
Total Hours21

MSN-Nurse Education Degree Requirements

Core Courses
NURS 5003Transcultural Family Health Care in Rural and Urban Settings3
NURS 5013Theoretical Foundations of Nursing3
NURS 5133Clinical Research3
NURS 5713Health Policy3
Select one of the following:3
Educational Statistics
Applied Statistical Methods and Computing
Clinical Core Courses
NURS 5023Advanced Pharmacology3
NURS 5033Advanced Pathophysiology3
NURS 5243Advanced Health Assessment3
Nurse Education Courses
NURS 5303Program & Curriculum Design3
NURS 5313Instructional Methods & Strategies3
NURS 5323Evaluation in Nursing Education3
NURS 5333Nursing Education Role Practicum I: Classroom Instruction3
NURS 5353Nursing Education Role Practicum II: Clinical Instruction3
Select one of the following option:6
Thesis Option
Thesis Proposal Writing
Thesis
Non-Thesis Option
Research Capstone Project
One Elective Course
Total Hours45

Post-Master’s Certificate - Nurse Education

MSN Clinical Core Courses 1
NURS 5023Advanced Pharmacology3
NURS 5033Advanced Pathophysiology3
NURS 5243Advanced Health Assessment3
Nurse Education Courses
NURS 5303Program & Curriculum Design3
NURS 5313Instructional Methods & Strategies3
NURS 5323Evaluation in Nursing Education3
NURS 5333Nursing Education Role Practicum I: Classroom Instruction3
NURS 5353Nursing Education Role Practicum II: Clinical Instruction3
Total Hours24
 
1

MSN Clinical Core Courses must be taken if not completed within the past 5 years. Transfer credits may be accepted for the Advanced Practice Courses.

Distance Education Programs

The central purpose of Distance Education at Prairie View A&M University is the elimination of geographical distance and time as barriers to access to quality courses and programs. Current course offerings include accounting, education administration, counseling, community development, communications, computer science, curriculum & instruction, economics, educational foundation, educational leadership, English, finance, human development, history, health, juvenile justice, psychology, mechanical engineering, management, marketing, management information systems, nursing, political science, sociology, Spanish, speech, special education and supervision.

As a support service for the academic enterprise, the office of Distance Learning works collaboratively across the university community to:

  • Electronically extend the campus of Prairie View A&M University through the NORTHSTAR and TTVN Telecommunications Networks for video delivery and through Moodle for online course delivery;

  • Provide an open learning environment where teaching and learning occur anytime and anyplace;

  • Share the practical applications of the university's knowledge and expertise to benefit society and support the economic growth and vitality of the local community;

  • Provide training for faculty and staff involvement in Distance Learning;

  • Increase Prairie View A&M University's access to the world and the world's access to the University;

  • Research Distance Learning environments and emerging academic technologies.

Distance Education and Moodle courses are listed in the PantherTracks and may also be accessed through eCourses.pvamu.edu.

Approved Programs:

  • RN-BSN Completion

  • MSN-Family Nurse Practitioner

  • MSN- Nurse Education

  • MSN- Nurse Administration

Distance Sites:

  • Northwest Graduate Center, Houston, TX

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Goals

The graduates from the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program will be prepared for leadership in direct patient care and system-based care roles.  The post master’s entrance for the PVAMU DNP program will build on the professional nurse’s depth and scope of knowledge and information management to become adept in the application of evidence-based science to practice.  DNP graduates will be experts in directing care for quality improvement and the management of information and organizations of individuals and populations.  The acquisition of advanced knowledge and clinical judgment will afford society a fully educated nurse leader who champions care and accountability in delivering care for population outcomes.  Overall, the PVAMU DNP program will position the graduate in exhibiting transformational leadership to effect and generate health policy development, evidence-base practice careers, and evaluation in collaboration with inter-professional teams and partnerships.

The program integrates three substantive dimensions of practice-focused doctoral education making it uniquely responsive to current trends and needs in nursing and healthcare.  First, it focuses on the development of leaders who will have skills in translating advanced knowledge  to decrease health disparities and improve health outcomes of diverse populations.  Secondly, the graduate of the program will be a nurse leader who is able to transform health care and organizational systems through the role of advanced practice nurse (practitioner).  Finally, the graduate of the program may also practice in academia; thus addressing the urgent need for nursing faculty.

Program Outcomes

Upon completion of the program, graduates will be prepared to:

  • Use theory, research, and science as the foundation for expert practice in the leadership roles of advanced practice nursing and education.
  • Collaborate with inter-professional teams in developing and implementing health care policies to effect change related to social, economic, political and ethical issues.
  • Use information systems technology to effect the improvement in health care quality and the transformation of health care.
  • Apply transformational leadership skills in organizational systems to effect change in health care outcomes of individuals and populations in diverse environments.
  • Improve the health outcomes of individuals and populations by decreasing disparities in health care delivery.
  • Contribute to the translation of nursing science in the role of advanced practice nurse and/or faculty.

Admission Requirements

Applicants applying for admission to the DNP Program must have:

An earned master’s degree in nursing from a program accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN) or the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE)

  • Hold a current license as a registered nurse in the State of Texas or have proof of licensure in another state; and have an unencumbered license to practice nursing
  • An official transcript of all academic work (undergraduate and graduate) from each college or university previously attended
  • A minimum of 3.00 on a 4.0 scale during undergraduate studies, and a minimum of 3.30 during master’s degree graduate studies
  • Completed master’s level courses in nursing research and advanced statistics within the last five (5) years
  • A Graduate Record Examination (GRE) score that is within five (5) years: Analytical Writing 3.5
  • Three (3) letters of recommendation, one of which must be from a faculty member in a nursing program
  • A current resume or curriculum vita
  • Documentation of a completed state and/or federal background check, including fingerprints
  • An interview with the program admission committee members and provision of a writing sample prior to interview.
  • National Certification and recognition by a US Board of Nursing as an advance practice nurse (FNP)
  • A scholarly writing sample (e.g., thesis, publication, professional paper, or proposal)
  • Strong commitment for program completion and leadership in an advanced nursing practice role

Applicants, who have not completed a graduate statistics course or master’s level course in nursing research in less than five years, will be required to complete one master’s level nursing research and/or advanced statistics course before or upon entering the DNP sequence of courses.  Satisfactory performance with a minimum grade of “B” will be required, and the student must complete the nursing research and/or statistics course within the first semester of enrollment in the program.

Advisement/Registration

Upon admission to the DNP Program, the student will be assigned to a faculty advisor. Students may be paired with more than one mentor, depending upon their professional and academic needs. The faculty advisor will work with the student to coordinate the selection of mentor(s).

Transfer of Graduate Courses from Other Universities

In accordance with the Office of Research and Graduate Studies and the College of Nursing, transfer students will have to satisfy the same criteria for admission as listed for initial applicants.  The transference of graduate credit earned from another accredited institution will not exceed six credit hours with a minimum grade of “B” and will be subjected to the preference of the College of Nursing Office of Admissions and Student Services.

Validation of MSN Practicum/Clinical Hours

DNP applicants must provide evidence of the number of clinical practice hours they completed in their master’s educational programs (Family Nurse Practitioner).  Applicants must submit one of the following:

  •  A letter of verification from an appropriate nursing administrator responsible for the master’s program from which the student graduated.  The letter shall indicate the total number of practicum hours completed by the student during the program of study and be notarized by the university’s registrar’s office.  This number is then used toward the required minimum of 1,000 hours of practice post-baccalaureate.
  • A letter from a national nursing certification agency attesting to the minimum number of clinical practicum hours required for certification in the student’s advanced nursing practice area at the time that the student was certified.  The student is credited with the identified minimum number of practicum hours which is used towards the required minimum of 1,000 hours of practice post-baccalaureate.

Documentation of prior practicum hours in an advanced practice program provided will be reviewed by the Program Director for acceptance towards clinical hour requirements in the program.  This review will be conducted after the student has accepted admission to the program and prior to the second week of the first semester of enrollment.  The student will meet with the Director to sign the Determination of DNP Clinical Hours form to document that the student has been duly informed.

Fees and Tuition

Fees are subject to change. Current information about PVAMU fees and tuition can be found on the university’s website: http://www.pvamu.edu/pages/4174.asp

Financial Assistance

The College of Nursing offers a limited number of graduate assistantships, research assistants, and scholarships to qualified full-time students.  Students interested in applying for financial assistance can visit the PVAMU Financial Aid Office website: http://www.pvamu.edu/pages/1630.asp

Time Limit on Work for Doctorate Degree

The DNP is a practice doctorate.  Therefore, students are advised to complete the program in the prescribed period - full-time status within five (5) semesters (including one summer) or two years and part-time status complete the course work within seven (7) semesters (including two summers).  All work toward the DNP degree must be completed within six (6) years.

Progression in the Program

Good Standing

Doctoral students remain in good standing when they maintain a minimum graduate GPA of 3.0 for coursework.  Only grades of “B” or better count toward coursework and dissertation hours. 

Reactivation in the Program

Reactivation to the program will be handled on a case by case basis.

Dismissal from the Program

Students shall be dismissed from the doctoral program for any one of the following reasons:

  •  An earned grade less than a grade of “B” in any required or elective course.
  • Failure to maintain a minimum doctorate GPA of 3.0 in coursework
  • Academic and/or professional misconduct

Instruction Mode of Delivery

The DNP courses will be offered using the hybrid or blended learning methodology.   Every course will be accessible through the University’s Moodle/E-Course platform (syllabi, hand-outs, videos, Power Point presentations, students’ delivery in posting of papers and assignments, faculty’s evaluations of students’ assignments, chat rooms and discussion forums, etc.).  It is therefore the student‘s responsibility to periodically check their email and course web pages for the latest information.   

Capstone Project Advisory Committee

The Capstone project will be completed with the structure and guidance of an advisory committee.  The Capstone Project Committee will be comprised of the chair and at least two other members (nursing faculty and an outside member).  The chair and committee members will be officially approved by the Dean of the College of Nursing, as per a written request submitted by the student via a signed “Consent to Serve” form.  The chair will serve as the lead committee member and will be responsible for supervising the student’s advisement and progress.   

Capstone Project

The Capstone project is a culmination of the knowledge gained in the DNP courses and results in a practice-related written product in which the student demonstrates use of evidence in nursing science and translation of findings into practice.  The project will provide the student an opportunity to apply advanced theoretical, policy and specialty knowledge in practice and systems level experiences. The Capstone project will be completed with the structure and guidance of an advisory committee.  The written product will be acceptable for sharing through peer refereed publications and presentations at local, state and national professional conferences.             

The Practice Residency

The practice residency is designed to help the student achieve the learning objectives of the program and specialty competencies through meaningful opportunities for student engagement.  Learning experiences will be designed to assist the learner in building and assimilating knowledge for advanced specialty practice at a high level of complexity, and will include in depth work with experts from nursing as well as other disciplines (inter-professionals).  The Nurse Practitioner students will complete a minimum of 1000 supervised practice hours.  The supervised practicum hours completed in the students’ MSN program will be included in the minimum number of hours. 

Grading System for Doctor of Nursing Practice Students

Grade Meaning Score Range Grade Values
A95-100
B85-94
C75-84
D65-74
Fbelow 65

Admission to Candidacy

It is the student’s responsibility to petition for advancement to candidacy.  Forms are available in the DNP Program Office.  The student must apply for candidacy when enrolled in the last required core or elective course (except Capstone and Residency).  To be advanced to candidacy, students must have completed all of the following requirements and/or procedures:

  •  Achieved a cumulative grade-point average no lower than 3.00 in program coursework.
  • Completed all coursework with no grade lower than “B”.

The admission to graduate study does not imply “advancement to candidacy” for the doctoral degree.

Degree Program Requirements

Students who enter the Doctor of Nursing Practice Program will be required to complete 39 hours after the Master’s degree and 1000 clinical hours of practicum (includes MSN practicum hours).

Core Courses (21 SCH)
NURS 7013Nursing Science and Complex Systems3
NURS 7023Leadership in Complex Health Systems3
NURS 7033Health Care Policy for Advocacy in Health Care3
NURS 7043Health Informatics: Systems Management of Health Data3
NURS 7053Evidence-based practice (Qualitative & Quantitative Methods)3
NURS 7143Analytical Approaches to Outcomes Management: Individuals and Populations3
NURS 7243Translating Evidence into Advanced Nursing Practice3
Project (6 SCH)
NURS 7253DNP Project 13
NURS 7263DNP Project 23
Practicum (6 SCH)
NURS 7383Practice Residency I3
NURS 7393Practice Residency II3
Electives6
Total Hours39

Courses

NURS 3001 Seminar I: 1 semester hour.

This seminar will help the student evolve as a professional by exploring the evolution of issues and trends using a historical perspective. Major issues and policies influencing health care will be included.

NURS 3003 Introduction to Pharmacology: 3 semester hours.

This course discusses basic concepts of pharmacology with emphasis on nursing implications.
Prerequisites: (NURS 3164 and NURS 3263 and MATH 1113).

NURS 3005 Transition to Professional Nursing: 5 semester hours.

Designed for the LVN to BSN student to explore the context of professional nursing including critical thinking and evidence based nursing practice. Course content and clinical activities focus on professional roles, values and responsibilities for nursing practice in a dynamic, culturally diverse care environment. Clinical application will focus on care of adults with a variety of health alterations.
Prerequisites: (BIOL 1054 and BIOL 1065).

NURS 3011 Seminar I-Intro To Prof Prac: 1 semester hour.

This course partially fulfills the requirements of a clinical internship program. It is designed to introduce students to professional practice. This is a collaborative work-study-scholarship program with a hospital agency and the College of Nursing.

NURS 3013 Individual Health Assessment: 3 semester hours.

This course introduces basic components and techniques of the health assessment within the framework of the nursing process. It focuses on data collection regarding the individual's adaptation to internal and external factors within the environment. Emphasis is placed on the individual with high level wellness throughout the lifespan. Laboratory experiences include the application of health assessment skills.
Prerequisites: BIOL 1073 and CHEM 1053 and CHEM 1051.

NURS 3021 Seminar II - Trans Adv Nur: 1 semester hour.

This course is designed to assist the student transition into the professional nursing practice by demonstration of clinical skills in patient care. This is the second course in a series of four courses required in this internship program.

NURS 3023 Basic Pathophysiology: 3 semester hours.

This course explores the basic principles and concepts of human disease processes. Normal, compensatory, and pathological mechanisms related to physiological functioning of the individual in health and illness are discussed.
Prerequisites: (BIOL 1073 and CHEM 1053 and CHEM 1051).

NURS 3031 Seminar III - Clinical Pract: 1 semester hour.

This course is designed to assist students practice nursing skills in various advanced patient care situations. This is the third course in a series of four courses required in this internship program.

NURS 3041 Seminar IV - Clinical Leadrshp: 1 semester hour.

This is the final (fourth) course to fulfill the clinical internship program. Students will demonstrate leadership in providing patient care and application of the professional nursing role.

NURS 3102 Tools For Success: 2 semester hours.

This course introduces the student to nursing as a profession. Learners explore historical perspectives, educational pathways and practice roles in nursing. Students will review major concepts which build on prerequisite coursework and develop skills to promote success in nursing.
Prerequisites: HIST 1313 and HIST 1323 and SOCG 1013 and PHIL 2013.

NURS 3164 Basic Concepts of Nursing: 4 semester hours.

This theory course introduces basic concepts utilized in health promotion and minor health alterations. Emphasis is placed on identifying basic human needs and understanding principles guiding nursing practice.
Prerequisites: (BIOL 1073 and BIOL 1054 and BIOL 1064 and HUSC 1343).
Co-requisite: NURS 3263.

NURS 3174 Adult Health Nursing I: 4 semester hours.

This theory course focuses on the nursing care of adult clients experiencing moderate to major alterations from health. Nursing care of clients with acute and chronic health alterations is explored.
Prerequisites: (NURS 3003 (may be taken concurrently) and NURS 3023 (may be taken concurrently) and NURS 3164 and NURS 3263 and NURS 3013).
Co-requisite: NURS 3273.

NURS 3185 Family Health Nursing: 5 semester hours.

This course focuses on the provision of family centered child care. Emphasis is placed on the nursing management of children and their families in health promotion and adaptation to illness.
Prerequisites: NURS 3174 and NURS 3273 and NURS 3003.
Co-requisite: NURS 3284.

NURS 3223 Introduction to Perioperative Nursing: 3 semester hours.

This theory and clinical course provides the student an opportunity to further develop knowledge and skills in the perioperative nursing role. Direct supervision will be provided enabling the student to experience components of the professional and technical role. Participation as a member of the surgical team will be included.
Prerequisites: (NURS 3013 and NURS 3164 and NURS 3174).

NURS 3263 Basic Concepts of Nursing Practicum: 3 semester hours.

This clinical practicum provides an opportunity for the application of concepts and principles basic to nursing practice. Experiences are provided in a variety of agencies for the utilization of the nursing process in caring for individuals with health promotion needs and minor to moderate health alterations.
Prerequisites: BIOL 1054 and BIOL 1064 and CHEM 1053 and CHEM 1051 and BIOL 1073.
Co-requisites: NURS 3013, NURS 3023, NURS 3164.

NURS 3273 Adult Health Nursing I Practicum: 3 semester hours.

This clinical practicum course provides an opportunity for students to use the nursing process to provide care for clients with acute and chronic health alterations. Clinical experiences are provided in a variety of acute care settings.
Prerequisites: NURS 3164 and NURS 3263.
Co-requisites: NURS 3003, NURS 3174.

NURS 3284 Family Health Nursing Practicum: 4 semester hours.

This clinical practicum provides an opportunity for the student to apply concepts and principles of family health nursing in a variety of health care settings. Implementation of care for childbearing and childrearing families occur within the framework of this course.
Prerequisites: NURS 3174 and NURS 3003 and NURS 3273.
Co-requisites: NURS 3185, NURS 4013.

NURS 3323 Health Disparities: 3 semester hours.

This course will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of health disparities, including investigative approaches as well as strategies to address health disparities in minority and medically underserved populations.

NURS 3343 Promoting Lifetime Physical Fitness and Wellness: 3 semester hours.

This course uses analysis of the student's lifestyle attitudes and practices related to activity and nutrition to develop a plan to improve individual behavior using a health promotion model. The student will implement and evaluate the effects of the program on his/her general health status and well-being.

NURS 3353 Camp Nursing: Care of Special Populations: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed to allow the undergraduate the opportunity to work with children who have asthma in an environment that emphasizes the wellness aspect of their health problem. The focus will be on the long term side effects, both emotional and physical effects of asthma and how to use the summer camp as an arena to increase education and self-esteem of the child. The clinical learning experiences take place in a camp setting for children with asthma.
Prerequisites: (NURS 3174 and NURS 3003).

NURS 3363 Jurisprudence: Ethical implications in Nursing: 3 semester hours.

The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice includes Professionalism and Professional Values as Essential VIII. It is clear and relevant that the values set forth by AACN, which also are the core values of bioethics, be incorporated in nursing education to enhance tolerance, patience, and compassion in a changing profession and a changing world.

NURS 3373 Environmental Health Nursing: 3 semester hours.

This course discusses concepts related to the environment and its role in health and in professional nursing. For all nursing students.

NURS 3383 Nurs w/o Borders:Global Health: 3 semester hours.

This is a lecture/lab course that focuses on a holistic approach to nursing care of families and cultural groups. Emphasis is placed on the nurse's role in health promotion, health maintenance and illness prevention in families from cultures in a national and international setting. Environmental influences on the family are explored.
Prerequisites: NURS 3003 and NURS 3024.

NURS 3393 Academic Strategies for Nursing Students Success: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed to provide nursing students with evidence-based study strategies to empower the learner for application and mastery of complex concepts for successful management and progression in the nursing major.

NURS 3413 Dosage Calculations Tools: 3 semester hours.

This course focuses on providing the student additional mathematical skills needed to successfully pass the dosage calculations examinations given with each clinical practicum course in the nursing program. The course includes face to face interactions with the faculty facilitator, in-class math computations, and implementation of critical thinking and test-taking skills needed to perform math calculations and successfully pass dosage calculations exams.

NURS 3423 Exploring Concepts of Patient Care across the Lifespan: 3 semester hours.

This elective will assist first level nursing students to apply concepts of biophysio-psychosocial functioning and beginning clinical reasoning skills for patient care across the lifespan.

NURS 4003 Concepts of Professional Nursing Practice: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed to assist the RN student make the transition to the University setting at the undergraduate and graduate level. The learner will be introduced to the knowledge, values, evidence based practice, health policy and conceptual models which guide the practice of nursing in a variety of settings. Ethical and legal principles which guide nursing practice will be explored.

NURS 4013 Introduction to the Research Process: 3 semester hours.

This course discusses basic research methodology and its application to the practice of nursing. Computer aids to research are considered. Prerequisite: Completion of Semester II.
Prerequisites: (PSYC 2613 and SPCH 1003 and NURS 3174 and NURS 3003).

NURS 4093 Community/Leadership Nursing: 3 semester hours.

This course focuses on the synthesis of public health and nursing concepts within a preventive framework to promote and maintain the health of families and communities. The course will also focus on leadership and management roles in various health care delivery systems and the theories related to change and organizational structure.
Prerequisites: NURS 4293 (may be taken concurrently).

NURS 4123 Special Topics in Nursing: 3 semester hours.

The study of various areas in nursing and health care as they relate to contemporary social issues. Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary.

NURS 4163 Mental Health Nursing: 3 semester hours.

This theory course focuses on the application of the nursing process in providing care to clients experiencing psychopathological conditions along the wellness-illness continuum.
Prerequisites: (NURS 3185 and NURS 3284 and PSYC 1113 and NURS 4013).
Co-requisite: NURS 4262.

NURS 4173 Community Health Nursing: 3 semester hours.

This theory course focuses on the synthesis of public health concepts within a preventive framework to promote and maintain the health of communities. The nursing process is used in community assessment, risk identification and application of community health nursing strategies.
Prerequisites: (NURS 4163 and NURS 4183).
Co-requisite: NURS 4272.

NURS 4183 Adult Health Nursing II: 3 semester hours.

This theory course emphasizes the utilization of the nursing process in providing care for clients experiencing major physiological deviations from wellness. Nursing care of clients with multi-system complex health alterations is explored.
Prerequisites: (NURS 3185 and NURS 3284 and NURS 4013).
Co-requisite: NURS 4282.

NURS 4193 Nursing Leadership and Management: 3 semester hours.

This theory course focuses on concepts and principles of leadership and management. Functions of beginning nurse management roles are explored.
Prerequisites: (NURS 4183 and NURS 4163).
Co-requisites: NURS 4173, NURS 4272, NURS 4292.

NURS 4223 Palliative Nursing Care: 3 semester hours.

NURS 4262 Mental Health Nursing Practicum: 2 semester hours.

This clinical practicum course focuses on the application of the nursing process when providing health, promotion, protection, and restoration care for culturally diverse individuals, groups and families at varying levels of risk for psychological impairment in a variety of clinical settings.
Prerequisites: (NURS 3185 and NURS 3284 and NURS 4013).
Co-requisite: NURS 4163.

NURS 4272 Community Health Nursing Practicum: 2 semester hours.

This clinical practicum provides the student an opportunity to synthesize the nursing process with public health concepts in the nursing care of individuals, families, groups and communities with a focus on preventive nursing care.
Prerequisites: (NURS 4183 and NURS 4163).
Co-requisites: NURS 4173, NURS 4193, NURS 4403.

NURS 4282 Adult Health Nursing II Practicum: 2 semester hours.

This clinical practicum course provides an opportunity for students to apply the nursing process when caring for client with multi-system complex health alterations. Clinical experiences in a variety of settings are used.
Prerequisites: (NURS 3185 and NURS 3284 and NURS 4013).
Co-requisite: NURS 4183.

NURS 4292 Nursing Leadership and Management Practicum: 2 semester hours.

This clinical practicum provides an opportunity for the transition of nursing students into professional nursing practice. Students will apply leadership and management principles and concepts to patient care coordinator of care, and functions of health care organizations.
Prerequisites: (NURS 4183 and NURS 4163).
Co-requisites: NURS 4173, NURS 4193, NURS 4403.

NURS 4293 Community/Leadership Practicum: 3 semester hours.

This clinical course emphasizes the nursing process in the application of community, leadership, and management concepts in planning, implementing, and directing nursing care for groups of clients and families from diverse populations.
Prerequisites: NURS 4093 (may be taken concurrently).

NURS 4313 Nursing and Cultural Diversity: 3 semester hours.

This course examines application of the nursing process as it relates to selected cultures. The primary concerns will be diverse communication systems and cultural norms within the health care delivery system.

NURS 4323 Introduction to Disaster/Emergency Preparedness and Response: 3 semester hours.

This course provides a foundation in the principles of disaster planning and management from a disaster team perspective. The roles of different members of the disaster team are examined with a focus on the role of the nurse. Various classifications of disasters, including natural and human-made disasters, are identified and defined and various biological, chemical and nuclear agents are discussed. Nursing care of physical injuries and psychological/behavior manifestations of disaster victims and workers involved in natural and man-made disasters are highlighted.

NURS 4353 Advanced Nursing Concepts: 3 semester hours.

This course explores advanced clinical and theoretical issues relating to nursing practice.
Prerequisites: (NURS 3185 and NURS 3284).

NURS 4373 Nursing and the Aged: 3 semester hours.

This course examines the utilization of the nursing process with aged clients. Major problems of aging are emphasized.

NURS 4383 Patient Education and Nursing Practice: 3 semester hours.

This course discusses patient education relative to the prevention of illness and to the maintenance and restoration of health.

NURS 4393 Synthesis of Nursing Concepts and Evidenced Base Practice: 3 semester hours.

This course focuses on preparing senior nursing students for the HESI comprehensive exit examination. NLN Diagnostic Readiness Test, Texas Board of Nursing Licensure Exam. The primary goal is to enhance the transition into nursing practice in the new role of graduate nurse (GN) in various healthcare settings.

NURS 4403 Nursing Process Seminar: 3 semester hours.

This course culminates professional socialization by focusing on the integration of behaviors essential in the transition from nursing student to professional nursing. Comprehensive review and evaluation of essential concepts and principles within the professional knowledge base including adult health, maternal/child, mental health, community health, and management.
Prerequisites: (NURS 4163 and NURS 4183).

NURS 4993 Independent Study: 1-3 semester hour.

Selected topics are explored through reading, research, and/or field work.

NURS 5003 Transcultural Family Health Care in Rural and Urban Settings: 3 semester hours.

Explores the cultural dimension of health care delivery in urban and rural settings. Emphasis is placed on examining concepts including health promotion, epidemiology and vulnerable populations. Opportunities are provided to apply theories from family studies, public health, community health nursing and primary health care to empower families and communities to promote healthy lifestyles.

NURS 5013 Theoretical Foundations of Nursing: 3 semester hours.

Presents theoretical foundations for nursing. Explores relationships between theories and advanced practice nursing. Examines various theories in nursing practice and other health care disciplines.

NURS 5022 Transcultural Family: 2 semester hours.

Explores the cultural dimension of health care delivery in urban and rural settings. Family theories, assessment instruments and therapeutic intervention strategies will be explored. Emphasis is placed on examining concepts including wellness, health promotion, epidemiology, case management, economics, and health care financing for vulnerable/minority populations.

NURS 5023 Advanced Pharmacology: 3 semester hours.

Provides a comprehensive understanding of the therapeutic use of major drug classifications for clients of all ages. Emphasis is on the application of drug therapy to the promotion of health and the treatment of disease. Advanced pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetic principles will be analyzed.

NURS 5033 Advanced Pathophysiology: 3 semester hours.

Advanced study of physiological and pathological processes at biochemical, cellular, organ and system levels. Course content includes biologic variations and susceptibility to pathology across different ethnic groups and specific populations.

NURS 5042 Role Theory and Ethics in Advanced Practice Nursing: 2 semester hours.

Role theory is utilized for analyzing the dimensions of the role of the APN in management of health care problems for vulnerable/minority individuals, families, and urban/rural communities. Ethical and legal decision-making models are explored to promote role transition and integration.

NURS 5123 Health Disparities: 3 semester hours.

The elective course will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of health disparities including investigative approaches as well as strategies for addressing health disparities in minority and medically underserved populations.

NURS 5133 Clinical Research: 3 semester hours.

The course focuses on the use of research methodologies to analyze nursing practice problems for a population of diverse ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds. The interrelationship between theory, practice and evidenced-based research, and the use of nursing knowledge for the improvement of clinical outcomes is emphasized. Review of major research designs, methods, and ethical requirements of scientific inquiry are addressed.
Prerequisites: NURS 5013 (may be taken concurrently).

NURS 5163 Advanced Pathophysiology for Advance Practice Nursing: 3 semester hours.

This course is used to guide the advance practice nursing student in interpreting changes in normal function that result in symptoms indicative of illness. Study of the physiological and pathophysiological processes that are a basis for advanced nursing practice. The emphasis is placed on the genetic, molecular, cellular and organ system levels across various groups and populations.

NURS 5173 Advanced Pharmacology for Advance Practice Nursing: 3 semester hours.

This course is to provide the APN graduate with the knowledge and skills to assess, diagnose, and manage patients' common health problems. Course theory content includes pharmacotherapeutics and pharmacokinetics of broad categories of pharmacologic agents. Evidence-based research provides the basis for selecting effective, safe and cost-efficient pharmacologic regimens.

NURS 5203 Medical Coding Bill & Reimbur: 3 semester hours.

This course is to help the Nurse Practitioner on how to maximize reimbursement by emphasizing proper coding, billing and HIPPA compliance. The Nurse Practitioner will learn about medical necessity bundled services, modifiers, and efficient ways to be compliant while getting the maximum reimbursement due for services performed. The NP provider will ensure complete and comprehensive documentation and coding and billing of all services rendered. Participants will learn to confidently code and audit APT, HCPCs and ICD-9 codes. Particular attention will be paid to evaluation and management coding.

NURS 5213 Diagnostic Procedures: 3 semester hours.

This course focuses on the development of evidence-based primary care diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for advanced practice registered nurses to use in practice. Multiple types of clinical applications are utilized to expand students' knowledge and proficiency in primary care clinical procedures. A structured 4-hour practice laboratory per week is a course requirement.

NURS 5214 Advanced Health Assessment with Practicum: 4 semester hours.

Builds upon basic physical assessment and history taking skills by increasing the depth and breadth of student knowledge related to the principles and techniques of interviewing, screening, and physical assessment across the lifespan. Includes interpretation of data and differential diagnosis. A structured laboratory and/or 8 hour practicum per week in an urban and rural setting is a course requirement.
Prerequisites: NURS 5033.

NURS 5216 Primary Health Care for the Childbearing/Childrearing Family with Practicum: 6 semester hours.

This combined theory and practicum course focuses on the role of the family nurse practitioner in caring for childbearing and childrearing families from diverse populations. Emphasis is placed on health promotion/maintenance, health risk assessment and acute symptoms management. Growth and development and psychosocial stages and tasks are presented.
Prerequisites: NURS 5163 and NURS 5173 and NURS 5263 and NURS 5245.

NURS 5223 Chronic Disease Self-Managemnt: 3 semester hours.

The course focuses on the development of skills for evidence-based methods of patient education and counseling for advanced nursing practice. Multiple types of clinical applications are utilized to expand student's knowledge and proficiency in patient education of chronic diseases. The course work includes 60 hours of experiential application of Chronic Disease Self-Management education and counseling. A structural clinical laboratory and/or 4 hour clinical practicum per week in an urban or rural setting is a course requirement.

NURS 5243 Advanced Health Assessment: 3 semester hours.

Builds upon basic physical assessment and history taking skills by increasing the depth and breadth of student knowledge related to the principles and techniques of interviewing, screening, and physical assessment across the lifespan. A structured 4 hour labor of practicum experience per week is a course requirement.

NURS 5245 Primary Health Care for the Adult and Elderly with Practicum: 5 semester hours.

This combined theory and practicum course focuses on the role of the family nurse practitioner in the management of the adult and elderly client in urban or rural communities. The emphasis is placed on health risk assessment, health maintenance/restoration and management of acute and chronic problems. Includes practicum experiences in a variety of settings.
Prerequisites: (NURS 5023 and NURS 5033 and NURS 5214).

NURS 5253 Urban/Rural Hlth: 3 semester hours.

This is a theoretical course that focuses on the interdisciplinary approach to applying principles and concepts of primary health care to meet the needs of urban and/or rural populations. Opportunities are provided to theories of public health, community health nursing and primary health care. Emphasis is placed on community assessment, problem identification, and mobilization of communities to promote wellness within an interdisciplinary framework.

NURS 5255 Adv Clin Prac Seminar: 5 semester hours.

In this synthesis practicum, the student uses theoretical, scientific, and current clinical knowledge for the assessment and management of health and illness in selected vulnerable populations. This practicum and seminar incorporates health promotion, disease prevention, and management of common acute and chronic health problems in adults and children. Seminar topics will include management of complex diseases, role implementation, research utilization, decision-making, consultation and referral for APN practice.

NURS 5257 Management of Complex Health Problems: 7 semester hours.

In this course, the student uses theoretical, scientific, and current clinical knowledge for the assessment and management of clients with complex health problems in selected vulnerable populations. Topics will include management of complex diseases, role implementation, research utilization, decision-making, consultation and referral for APN practice.
Prerequisites: (NURS 5245 and NURS 5215).

NURS 5263 Advanced Health Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning for Advanced Practice Nursing: 3 semester hours.

Building upon previously acquired physical assessment and history taking skills, this course prepares graduate advanced practice nursing students to obtain a meaningful history and to integrate it with physical findings to develop a problem list. Interpretation of selected diagnostic tests and differential diagnoses. Analyze diagnostic reasoning models and apply to advanced practice nursing contexts.
Prerequisites: NURS 5003 and NURS 5163 and NURS 5133.
Co-requisites: NURS 5042, NURS 5173.

NURS 5303 Program & Curriculum Design: 3 semester hours.

The focus of this course is on curricula design and development. Students will examine the principles of curriculum and program design, factors that affect curriculum, philosophies, conceptual frameworks, curriculum models, and curriculum evaluation. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between philosophy, program goals, objectives and content.
Prerequisites: (NURS 5013 and NURS 5133 and NURS 5023 and NURS 5033 and NURS 5042).

NURS 5313 Instructional Methods & Strategies: 3 semester hours.

The student examines various teaching strategies and methods, educational theories, principles of learning, and theories relevant to the instructional process will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on classroom and clinical teaching, supervision and management of the learning environment. Teaching using technology will be a major focus.
Prerequisites: NURS 5303.

NURS 5323 Evaluation in Nursing Education: 3 semester hours.

This course focuses on evaluation techniques and strategies. The design and use of evaluation tools in classroom and clinical evaluation will be discussed. The identification and evaluation of clinical competencies will be an area of focus. Test development, measurement and the use of evaluation instruments will be examined. Emphasis is placed on evaluation measures such as standardized tests and item analysis of teacher made test.
Prerequisites: (NURS 5303 and NURS 5313).

NURS 5333 Nursing Education Role Practicum I: Classroom Instruction: 3 semester hours.

This course emphasizes the integration of knowledge from curriculum design, strategies and evaluation into the role of nurse educator. Students are provided experiences in the classroom settings to develop knowledge, apply theories, learning principles and evidence based teaching and evaluation strategies under the direction of a faculty preceptor.
Prerequisites: (NURS 5303 and NURS 5313 and NURS 5323 (may be taken concurrently)).

NURS 5343 Teaching in Nursing with Tech: 3 semester hours.

The course will focus on the use of technology for effective teaching and presentations. The goal of the course is to assist the learner in the infusion of instructional design, media, computers, and related web based technologies into the instructional process. Emphasis will be placed on using technology to enhance presentations.

NURS 5353 Nursing Education Role Practicum II: Clinical Instruction: 3 semester hours.

This course focuses on the application of teaching, learning and evaluation strategies in the clinical setting. Students are provided the experiences in the clinical setting to apply theories, models, skills, learning principles and develop attributes essential to the rose of nurse educators in academic and clinical settings. Emphasis is placed on assessment and evaluation of learning outcomes.
Prerequisites: NURS 5303 and NURS 5313 and NURS 5323.

NURS 5363 Clinical Simulations in Nursing Education and Practice: 3 semester hours.

This course will focus on the theoretical and technical knowledge and skills needed to plan, design, and implement simulated learning activities in the educational and health care settings. Emphasis will be placed on best practices in the use of clinical simulations as a virtual learning modality.

NURS 5403 ADM I-Organizational Theory: 3 semester hours.

This course examines organizational concepts, theories, and behavior relevant to Nurse Administration, management and health care delivery systems. Major topics include management principles, organizational processes, conflict and change process. Discussion will include management philosophy, structure, legal and ethical concerns.
Prerequisites: (NURS 5003 and NURS 5013 and NURS 5133 and NURS 5042).

NURS 5413 ADM II-Healthcare Management: 3 semester hours.

The focus of this course is on healthcare management issues and strategies: Healthcare of individual populations, case management, health promotion, disease management, standards of care, cost, quality, health indicators, and disparities. Human Resource Management, including data management and informatics will be emphasized.
Prerequisites: NURS 5403.

NURS 5423 ADM III-Healthcare Economics and Financial Management: 3 semester hours.

This course focuses on economics and financing in health care delivery systems. Major topics include budget preparation and fiscal management within an organizational structure. Emphasis will be placed on the use of databases, spreadsheets and other software applications to the budgetary process. Insurance providers, impact of consumers, cost and benefits, state and federal regulations, legal and ethical issues will also be included.
Prerequisites: (NURS 5403 and NURS 5413).

NURS 5433 ADM IV - Nurse Administration Practicum: 3 semester hours.

A practicum experience designed for synthesis of theory and practice. Practicum will include group seminar, observational and independent learning activities. Practicum experiences will be directed toward the student's career goals.
Prerequisites: (NURS 5403 and NURS 5413 and NURS 5423).

NURS 5443 Health Informatics I: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed to introduce the foundations of health care informatics to the advanced practice nurse. The focus is on developing an understanding of the core concepts of health care informatics and correlating these to the practice of nursing informatics. The history, use, design, management, and ethics of health care information systems will be examined with attention to current issues and trends impacting the profession of nursing.

NURS 5453 Health Informatics II: 3 semester hours.

The purpose of this course is to assist the advanced practice nurse in developing an understanding of the components, processes and tools that complete components of health information systems. Advanced topics in information technology and systems in a health care setting; collection, analysis and management of health care data; special topics related to the role of project management will be explored.

NURS 5463 Health Informatics III: 3 semester hours.

The course introduces concepts of human factors design, specifically human computer interaction and ergonomics, and applies them to interface design in healthcare. This includes the user interface design of medical devices, health related websites, and health information systems. This course examines principles, theories and models to design and evaluate optimal interfaces to promote human computer interaction in health care informatics and applications.

NURS 5713 Health Policy: 3 semester hours.

This course focuses on the development of health care policy. Current, local, state, and national issues influencing health policies are reviewed. Health care delivery models are explored as well as the concepts of power, political action, activism and networking. Major health policy issues facing advanced practice nursing in the 21st century are considered.

NURS 5723 Family Violence: 3 semester hours.

Explores the prevalence of violence and abuse in families and the impact of violence and abuse on the health care system. Focuses on the research findings related to prevention, assessment, and intervention with offenders, victims and families.

NURS 5733 Women Depression: 3 semester hours.

Addresses the nature of the problem, family issues, intervention, prevention, treatment and recovery in order to enable the student to better understand, recognize, assess, and treat problems of depression in women.

NURS 5743 Writing for Publication: 3 semester hours.

Designed to help students understand the publication process and to improve scholarly writing abilities. Each student will prepare a manuscript and submit it to a selected nursing journal for publication consideration. Students are encouraged to have a topic and target journal identified before class begins.
Prerequisites: (NURS 5013 and NURS 5133).

NURS 5753 HIV/AIDS Issues and Challenges: 3 semester hours.

Emphasis on the social, economic, psychological, ethical, and legal issues associated with living with HIV and caring for persons with HIV.

NURS 5763 Financial Management in Advanced Nursing Practice: 3 semester hours.

This course focuses on health care financing at the local, state and national levels as well as the concepts of reimbursement, contract, negotiation, and partnerships in practice. Cost effective analysis is explored as a tool to examine cost and outcomes for the care diverse populations.
Prerequisites: NURS 5245.
Co-requisite: NURS 5216.

NURS 5773 Capstone Proposal Writing and Project Development: 3 semester hours.

This course provides students the opprtunity to integrate and synthesize knowledge gained in the graduate nursing program into the practice setting with directed study in an area of interest.
Prerequisites: NURS 5013 and NURS 5133 and CNSL 5093 and NURS 5003 and NURS 5042 and NURS 5713 and NURS 5033 and NURS 5023.

NURS 5783 Research Capstone Project: 3 semester hours.

The research capstone project is the scholarly alternative to the thesis. The project provides students the opportunity to use the research process to investigate a problem in clinical practice, nursing education or administration. This course is a faculty guided experience that requires synthesis of nursing theory, research, and practice into an oral presentation and written research paper.
Prerequisites: NURS 5013 and NURS 5133.

NURS 5803 Thesis Proposal Writing: 3 semester hours.

Concepts of research techniques and designs are explored. A research proposal is developed.

NURS 5903 Thesis: 3 semester hours.

Application of research skills to thoroughly develop thesis on topic approved by advisor.
Prerequisites: NURS 5803.

NURS 5983 Special Topics: 3 semester hours.

Exploration of a single topic not covered in the graduate curriculum (i.e. curriculum development, curriculum evaluation, and skills practicum) but related to Health Care and/or Nursing.

NURS 5993 Independent Study: 1-3 semester hour.

Provides an opportunity for the student to engage in independent study in an area of interest.

NURS 7003 Scientific Writing: 3 semester hours.

Scientific writing is the formal writing process utilized in academic settings for manuscript preparation, grant proposals, as well as thesis and dissertation development. The purpose of this course is to provide graduate students with a formal writing experience in an academic or administrative setting. Legal and ethical issues related to plagiarism and professional collaboration will be applied. At the end of the course the learner will have the opportunity to experience the process of developing a formal writing product moving from an outline to a finished written product.

NURS 7013 Nursing Science and Complex Systems: 3 semester hours.

This course introduces students to systems theory in complex organizations. Students share knowledge of the health care systems and broad-based thinking and human networking of care delivery systems in response to the demands of nursing practice considering the legal and ethical issues of practice. The occurrence of change as a dynamic gauge will enable students to fit relationships with emerging new challenges, transition and interfacing with systems, management of conflict, medication and interventions. Sharing the impact of global technology in transforming knowledge and communication in the complex adaptive systems of universal health amidst health system constraints will be essential.

NURS 7023 Leadership in Complex Health Systems: 3 semester hours.

This course focuses on organizational theories and principles in a complex health care environment along with the use of technological innovations and considers the legal and ethical issues in education, administration and clinical practice. Emphasis is placed on managing complex health care systems in a global environment. The societal and organizational influences related to managing complex health care organization are examined and the legal and ethical issues in education, administration and clinical practice.

NURS 7033 Health Care Policy for Advocacy in Health Care: 3 semester hours.

This course is prepares DNP graduate to assume a leadership role in the designing, implementing and advocating for health care policies that impact health financing, regulation of nursing practice, and the delivery of safe, effective quality care to clients. Methods that can be used to integrate health care policies into nursing practice will be explored on the basis of legal and ethical principles. Students will be provided the opportunity to interact with individuals responsible for health care policies on the local, state, and national level.

NURS 7043 Health Informatics: Systems Management of Health Data: 3 semester hours.

This course provides students with the opportunity to explore health information technology from a systems perspective and as a disruptive technology. The content spans the health informatics discipline from bioinformatics through clinical applications and to the population level of public health informatics. Health informatics is presented as inter-disciplinary, inter-professional and collaborative. Students are exposed to the use of data, information and knowledge and their application in the discipline.

NURS 7053 Evidence-based practice (Qualitative & Quantitative Methods): 3 semester hours.

This course focuses on the utilization of evidence to guide education administration and clinical practice. The leadership role of the APN in the translation of research into practice, the evaluation of practice, and the improvement in patient outcomes based on evidence will be emphasized. The role of the APN in generating evidence through their practice will also be discussed. During this course the student will assess practice quality, critically analyze evidence, apply research evidence to issues of current health care delivery using appropriate practice, legal and ethical guidelines.

NURS 7113 Resource Management: 3 semester hours.

The design and execution of strategies to manage human and financial resources within complex health systems is the focus. The course assists students with strategic conceptualization and application to manage an organization's human and financial assets, implementation of these strategies to achieve the organization's objectives. This course is structured to help the student move from conceptual ideas to practical application.

NURS 7123 Emerging Technologies and the Teaching/Learning Process: 3 semester hours.

This course will focus on technology and its application in nursing education and the practice environment. Emphasis will be placed on emerging technology that could have a significant impact on teaching, learning, nursing practice and scholarship. Technologies that may be included are social computing, mobile computing, web based strategies, virtual worlds, simulation, and learning management systems. The course content will change over time as emerging technologies become available and affect teaching, learning and creative expression in higher education.

NURS 7133 Nursing Education Teaching/Learning Modalities: 3 semester hours.

This course focuses on the application of teaching/learning theories in both traditional and electronic classroom and clinical practice section. Students will be able to develop instructional and educational material, present them in a variety of educational settings as well as evaluate the effectiveness of instructional strategies. Application of emerging technologies available for learning and instruction will be explored.

NURS 7143 Analytical Approaches to Outcomes Management: Individuals and Populations: 3 semester hours.

This course prepares the student to analyze epidemiological, biostatistical, environmental, and other appropriate data related to individual, aggregate, and population health. Students will learn business and economic procedures for analysis of cost effective initiatives to improve quality and safety of health care outcomes. Organization of relevant variables for place in databases, identification of appropriate analyses for health-related questions, and synthesis of diverse approaches to understanding health problems in the literature will be integrated into coursework.

NURS 7153 Informatics for Using Telehealth in Nursing Practice: 3 semester hours.

This course focuses on the use of telehealth technologies to delivery health care and services to clients in rural and underserved areas with limited nursing resources. Technology designed to view, send, and store video and digital image, perform patient assessments, patient teaching, and collaborate with other health care professionals using video conferencing and computer applications will be explored. Legal and ethical issues associated with the use of telehealth applications will be discussed.

NURS 7243 Translating Evidence into Advanced Nursing Practice: 3 semester hours.

This course focuses on the integration and application of knowledge into practice. The translation of evidence into practice, including the theoretical and practical challenges, is analyzed through the use of case studies with consideration of legal and ethical principles. Specifically, theories of change, theories of caring, human needs and value systems, financial, ethical and social implications are considered in the translation of evidence into practice. Translation techniques, including informatics, will be discussed. Evaluation strategies, methods and analysis will be applied to assess proposed improvements in practice and care outcomes.

NURS 7253 DNP Project 1: 3 semester hours.

This course is part of a two semester sequence with stipulated guidelines and required of all DNP students. The course focuses on the initial development of a capstone project including review of problem statement, review of the literature, objective, project activities, project timeline, resources, and evaluation strategies. It also includes process and outcome evaluation, budget development, and measurement tools. The project may include financial/management, clinical, or educational components as appropriate. The project will be developed under the supervision of the student's DNP project committee. May be repeated. If in progress "IP" grade received, continuous registration and enrollment in this course are required until course requirements are completed.

NURS 7263 DNP Project 2: 3 semester hours.

This course is the second part of a three semester sequence required of all DNP students. The course focuses on implementation of the DNP project that was planned and approved in NURS 7253 (DNP Project 1). Strategies to address challenges in the implementation of the capstone project will be explored. The collection and analysis of data to evaluate the outcomes of the capstone project is the culmination of this course. Students will also develop and present a comprehensive report describing their project, implementation, evaluation, results and future recommendations. May be repeated. If in progress "IP" grade received, continuous registration and enrollment in this course are required until course requirements are completed.
Prerequisites: NURS 7253.

NURS 7303 Program and Curriculum Design: 3 semester hours.

The focus of this course is on curricula design and development. Students will examine principles of curriculum and program design, factors that affect curriculum, philosophies, conceptual frameworks, models and evaluation. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between philosophy, program outcomes and the accreditation process.

NURS 7323 Evaluation and Measurement: 3 semester hours.

This course focuses on techniques and methods for evaluating learning outcomes. Emphasis will be placed on program evaluation measures. The design and use of evaluation tools classroom and clinical evaluation will be discussed. Test development, measurement and the use of evaluation instruments will be examined. Evaluation measures, standardized tests and item analysis of teacher made tests will be an area of focus.

NURS 7383 Practice Residency I: 3 semester hours.

This is one of two clinical residency courses providing for synthesis experiences with a clinical coach in the student's advanced practice specialization, practice/administration or both. Students will synthesize concepts from biophysical, psychosocial, sociopolitical, culture, economic, and nursing science to impact and understand the consequences of advanced practice decisions. May be repeated. If in progress "IP" grade received, continuous registration and enrollment in this course are required until course requirements are completed.

NURS 7393 Practice Residency II: 3 semester hours.

This course is the continuation of the clinical residency. Utilizing newly acquired knowledge, students will appraise their current practice environments as appropriate to the student's practice agenda. The student will also continue to work with his or her clinical mentor. May be repeated. If in progress "IP" grade received, continuous registration and enrollment in this course are required until course requirements are completed.
Prerequisites: NURS 7383.