College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology

Purpose and Goals

The College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology offers undergraduate courses leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice or Criminal Justice with a specialization in Juvenile Justice; as well as, a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology. The College also offers graduate courses leading to a Master of Science degree in Juvenile Justice, a Master of Science degree in Juvenile Forensic Psychology, a Ph.D. degree in Juvenile Justice, and a Ph.D. degree in Clinical Adolescent Psychology.

The College of Juvenile Justice & Psychology is committed to preparing students to be nationally competitive for graduate education and careers in criminal/juvenile justice and psychology. The psychology curriculum is designed to ensure that students acquire the research, knowledge, and skills to pursue careers in any area of endeavor (e.g., helping professions, industry, education, youth development). The criminal justice and specialization in juvenile justice programs are designed to produce graduates who are skilled in improving the life experiences of individuals in the juvenile/criminal justice systems, law enforcement, and child-helping organizations.

Instructional Organization 

Program Degree Offered
Criminal JusticeBS
Criminal Justice with a specialization in Juvenile JusticeBS
PsychologyBS
Juvenile Forensic PsychologyMS
Juvenile JusticeMS & PhD
Clinical Adolescent PsychologyPhD

The Texas Juvenile Crime Prevention Center

In 1997, the Texas Legislature authorized the creation of the Texas Juvenile Crime Prevention Center (Texas JCPC) at Prairie View A&M University. This resulted in the creation of the College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology. The Texas JCPC is unique in the State of Texas and the nation and is committed to assisting with the reduction of juvenile crime and delinquency among youth.

The purpose of the Texas JCPC is to:

  • Increase the knowledge of educators, practitioners, and others by conducting research and evaluation relating to juvenile crime;
  • Improve the knowledge and skills of students in the field of criminal justice by offering undergraduate degrees, graduate degrees, and continuing education;
  • Improve the dissemination of information relating to the reduction of juvenile crime;
  • Increase knowledge about programs and policies that address juvenile crime; and
  • Enhance the skills of personnel by providing training and advice for practitioners engaged in juvenile crime and delinquency prevention.

Justice Studies

Alpha Phi Sigma - National Honor Society in Criminal Justice . The Honor Society was created to recognize scholarship among students of Criminal Justice and provide them with opportunities to attend various conferences sponsored by the national organization. Students are also provided information about opportunities in careers in Criminal Justice as well as educational opportunities in graduate and professional schools.

The Criminal Justice Club. This organization is open to any student majoring or minoring in Criminal Justice at this institution. The primary purpose of the organization is to provide its members with information about career opportunities and graduate and professional educational opportunities in the field. They also provide a forum for various recruiters to speak to its members and they also take field trips to area criminal justice agencies to observe and speak with professionals.

National Association of Blacks in Criminal Justice - Student Division. This is a national organization of Criminal Justice Professionals who provide its members with current information about the field of Criminal Justice. The Prairie View Chapter provides its members with opportunities to attend various conferences sponsored by the national organization and regional chapters. Students also have access to career counseling and information about career opportunities with various federal, state, and local agencies.

Psychology

Psi Chi is the National Honor Society in Psychology, founded in 1929 for the purposes of encouraging, stimulating, and maintaining excellence in scholarship, and advancing the science of psychology. Membership is open to graduate and undergraduate students who are making the study of psychology one of their major interests, and who meet the minimum GPA qualifications. Psi Chi is a member of the Association of College Honor Societies and is an affiliate of the American Psychological Association (APA) and the American Psychological Society (APS).

ABPsi Student Circle is a member of The Association of Black Psychologists, founded in San Francisco in 1968 to actively address the serious problems facing Black psychologists and the larger Black community. The Student Circle of the Association of Black Psychologists was founded in 1993 to serve as a mentoring program and establish a collective voice for the next generation. ABPsi Student Circle emphasizes community research and outreach and the need to prepare current students for future leadership roles in the field of psychology. The aim is to promote mentorship relations between professionals and psychology students and to aid in the struggle to improve the emotional well-being of people of African descent wherever possible. Membership is extended to students who major or minor in psychology.

The Psychology Club is a recognized student organization designed to provide an intellectual and social atmosphere for students. The purpose is to engage students in the exchange of information concerning the field of psychology, encourage student research and scholarship ideas, and to pursue excellence for entering into graduate school.

Clinical Psychology Courses

CPSY 7623 Biological Bases of Behavior: 3 semester hours.

The study of relationships among biological systems (e.g., neurological, cardiovascular, endocrine) and psychological functioning (e.g., sensory and perception, memory, learning, emotion, cognition) in the context of normal and abnormal behavior. Review of current theory and research procedures is provided.

CPSY 7631 Professional Issues in Clinical Psychology: 1 semester hour.

This course is a proseminar series aimed at exposing students to historical, current, and emerging research and professional issues in clinical psychology.

CPSY 7653 Thesis I: 3 semester hours.

Independent and original research leading to the completion of an acceptable empirical master's thesis.

CPSY 7663 Thesis II: 3 semester hours.

Independent and original research leading to the completion of an acceptable empirical master's thesis.

CPSY 7673 Thesis III: 3 semester hours.

Independent and original research leading to the completion of an acceptable empirical master's thesis.

CPSY 7683 Thesis IV: 3 semester hours.

Independent and original research leading to the completion of an acceptable empirical master's thesis.

CPSY 7703 Cognitive Psychology: 3 semester hours.

This course addresses how people acquire the ability to know and think, reason, and determine logical outcomes. Cognition is the ability to integrate higher cortical functions in order to orient the self to their innate CNS abilities and how to use this resource to navigate the external world. Involved are basic intellect, emotional stability, appropriate communication and ethnocentric comprehension of one's environment and social situation. Relevant neurophysiologic aspects of cognition are reviewed as well as the history and philosophy of cognitive psychology.

CPSY 7713 Social Psychology: 3 semester hours.

A critical foundation course, social psychology is a bridge discipline involving both group and individual dynamics. Started in the U.S. at the University of Chicago during the early 19th century, social psychology provided the forum for significant interdisciplinary studies during the Great Depression, the World Wars and beyond. Research on basic human interpersonal and intra-group and inter-group dynamics are presented (Hawthorne effect, primacy effect, stereotyping, physical attractiveness, attribution bias, social power, compliance, obedience, risky-shift phenomenon) as well as their impact on race relations, gender and sex issues, systems (family, school, community institutions) and peer relations. Enculturation, socialization, group influences (significant and generalized others), and the impact of social sanctions as well as collective and behavioral attribution processes are covered.

CPSY 7723 Foundations in Neuropsychology: 3 semester hours.

The study of relationships between brain functioning (e.g., memory, learning, cognition, perception and language comprehension and expression) and normal and abnormal behavior. Common neurological disorders and related diagnoses are reviewed, as well as assessment procedures used for diagnostic purposes. Child and adolescent functioning is emphasized. Review of current theory and research methodology is addressed. Course content is presented for non-neuroscience majors.

CPSY 7733 Child and Adolescent Development: 3 semester hours.

This course will delve into the behavior and mental processes of children and adolescents. It will focus on the biological, social, emotional, cognitive, intellectual and interpersonal developmental paths from infancy to adolescence, along with a review of the current best practice social and clinical strategies (parent-child relations, family and systems psychology). Research findings pertinent to ethnic minority youth will be explored in an attempt to balance mainstream resources. Integration of theory and practice will be fundamental. Models of abnormal and normal trajectories will be explored within the context of individual and cultural differences.

CPSY 7743 Professional Ethics: 3 semester hours.

The current American Psychological Association (APA) Ethical Principles of Psychology and Code of Conduct are discussed in detail including the General Principles and the Components of the Ethical Standards: (1) Resolving Ethical Issues; (2) Competence: (3) Human Relations: (4) Privacy & Confidentiality: (5) Advertising & other Public Statements: (6) Record Keeping & Fees: (7) Education & Training: (8) Research & Publication; (9) Assessment: and (10) Therapy. Significant legal milestone and relevant cases (Tarasoff, Larry P. v. Riles, Youngberg v. Romeo, and Borwin v. Board of Education) are also discussed in detail.

CPSY 7753 Systems of Psychotherapy: 3 semester hours.

This course will include contemporary approaches in clinical psychology and a comprehensive treatment of the historical antecedents of selected theories and systems of psychology. It will also explore the theory, research and practice of major systems of psychotherapy including humanistic psychodynamic, behavioral cognitive, and family systems approach. The underlying assumptions about human nature and knowledge that form the foundation of these theories will also be examined with special consideration given to cultural issues throughout the course.

CPSY 7763 Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy: 3 semester hours.

This course equips students to become more competent in therapeutic work with children, adolescents, and their families by (a) presenting theoretical models of therapy, (b) teaching specific techniques in working with a wide range of problems that children and adolescents may experience, and (c) discussing ethical and other complex issues that come up in the course of providing therapy to children and adolescents.

CPSY 7773 Learning Theory & Clinical App: 3 semester hours.

The study of theoretical and procedural issues in basic learning mechanisms, in animals and humans, including classical and instrumental conditioning and social cognitive frameworks. Concept applications to relevant biological mechanisms and clinical interventions (e.g., behavior modification, systematic desensitization) are emphasized with particular attention to procedures implemented with children and adolescents. Coverage of parental and school consultation techniques is provided regarding behavior modification of children and adolescents. A review of research regarding applications of current theoretical models is presented.

CPSY 7783 Developmental Psychology: 3 semester hours.

This course focuses on the origins, maintenance, and change of behavior and cognition across the lifespan. The major theoretical issues that define the field of developmental psychology will be emphasized. The course will emphasize (a) how individuals actively contribute to their own development (b) the way development is shaped by aspects of the sociocultural context, and (c) how adaptive functioning is maintained in the presence of aging, injury, or trauma. Implications of these theoretical issues for understaning a typical development and optimizing everyday functioning will also be covered.

CPSY 7793 Personality Psychology: 3 semester hours.

The major theorists and theoretical constructs and how these concepts evolved over time into the basic psychological schools of personality: behavioral/behaviorism (including operant, classical, learning, cognitive and rational/emotive approaches); psychoanalytic/psychodynamics; and the humanistic approach will be taught. Theories of personality with emphasis on development within childhood and adolescence will be explored. Coverage of psychological, social and cultural factors impacting the adjustment of both normal and abnormal individuals will be taught. Assessment tools include the MMPI-A, Myers-Briggs-Type Indicator, Draw-A-Person techniques and various Thematic Apperception measures.

CPSY 7803 Psychological Assessment I: 3 semester hours.

This course begins the process of developing competence in psychological assessment, thereby providing a foundation for future clinical coursework, practica, and supervised work experiences. The course covers basic assessment of cognitive functioning; selected measures of psychosocial and emotional functioning; ethnical, cultural, and clinical issues associated with psychological assessment; case formulation and integrative report writing; and the principles of psychological measurement (including reliability, validity, norms and standard scores).

CPSY 7813 Psychological Assessment II: 3 semester hours.

This course covers basic personality assessment and grounds students in both traditional and behvioral approaches. From the traditional perspective, the course provides an overview of projective and objective personality assessment along with in-depth coverage of psychometrics and a range of overarching assessment issues, including the stability of behavior, validity of clinical judgement, and clinical versus statistical prediction. From the behavioral perspective , the course introduces the conceptual bases and applied implications of the behavioral approach and contrast it with the traditional approach. Basic clinical interviewing, use and interpretation of measures, and report writing are also emphasized.

CPSY 7823 Practicum I: 3 semester hours.

Provides supervised experience in the assessment, management and treatment of clients. Students work in the PV Psychological Clinic. Training includes interviewing and taking case histories, observations, and staff and case conferences.

CPSY 7833 Practicum II: 3 semester hours.

Provides supervised experience in the assessment, management and treatment of clients. Students work in the PV Psychological Clinic. Training includes interviewing and taking case histories, observations, and staff and case conferences.

CPSY 7843 Practicum III: 3 semester hours.

Provides supervised experience assisting psychologists in the assessment, management and treatment of clients. Students work the PV Psychological Clinic. Training includes interviewing and taking case histories, observations, and staff and case conferences.

CPSY 7853 Practicum IV: 3 semester hours.

Provides supervised experience in the assessment, management and treatment of clients. Students work in the PV Psychological Clinic or in an approved institutional setting such as a prison, court, special treatment clinic, hospital or rehabilitation setting. Training includes interviewing and taking case histories, observations, staff and case conferences.

CPSY 7863 Practicum V: 3 semester hours.

Provides supervised experience in the assessment, management and treatment of clients. Students work in an the PV Psychological Clinic or an approved institutional setting such as a prison, court, special treatment clinic, hospital or rehabilitation setting. Training includes interviewing and taking case histories, observations, staff and case conferences.

CPSY 7873 Individual Psychotherapy: 3 semester hours.

Centers on the clinical interview as a means of gathering relevant life data; defining problems, and resolving conflicts. Surveys the theory and use of the interview, particularly as related to various counseling theories.

CPSY 7883 Psychopathology: 3 semester hours.

This course will provide an in-depth review of a broad spectrum of psychopathological conditions defined in the DSM. The focus is on etiology, prevalance and incidence, signs and symptoms, and criteria for differential diagnosis. The emphasis is on comparing and contrasting different theoretical perspectives on each disorder, as well as reviewing the empirical literature in support of those theoretical perspectives.

CPSY 7893 Multicultural Issues in Clinical Psychology: Theory, Research and Practice: 3 semester hours.

This course surveys the research, theories, assessment and clinical practice of counseling with various racial/ethnic minority and gay/lesbian/bisexual populations in the United States. Special consideration is given to examining the intersection among race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender and class on psychological adjustment.

CPSY 7913 Special Topics: 3 semester hours.

A seminar designed to allow flexibility in doctoral student degree plans and to promote awareness and understanding of issues in Clinical Psychology as these develop.

CPSY 7933 History & Systems of Psychology: 3 semester hours.

This is an advanced philosophically oriented graduate seminar on the history of psychology and its theoretical systems, and their relations to contemporary psychology. Pertinent issues in the history and philosophy of science are addressed as well as current concerns. The course compares Western psychology in the 19th and 20th centuries with selected indigenous psychologies. Special attention is given to system of thought that have emerged since the founding of psychology as an empirical science.

CPSY 7943 Research Methods and Design in Clinical Psychology: 3 semester hours.

Development of research, design most useful to social sciences problems, descriptive systems for qualitative analysis; data collection methods such as observation, development of interview schedules, construction of questionnaires and socio-metric devices; validity and reliability.

CPSY 7953 Statistical Methods in Psychology: 3 semester hours.

This course is an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics, and covers basic statistical and research concepts, graphical displays of data, measures of central tendency and variability, standardized scores, probability, hypothesis testing, normal distributions, confidence intervals, post hoc analysis, model assumptions, analysis of variance, repeated measures analysis, and analysis of covariance.

CPSY 7963 Advanced Statistical Techniques: 3 semester hours.

Multivariate statistical techniques including multiple regression, logistic regression, discriminate analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, canonical correlation, factor analysis, cluster analysis, and multi-dimensional scaling.

CPSY 8913 Dissertation I: 3 semester hours.

Independent and original research leading to an acceptable doctoral dissertation.

CPSY 8923 Dissertation II: 3 semester hours.

Independent and original research leading to an acceptable doctoral dissertation.

CPSY 8933 Dissertation III: 3 semester hours.

Independent and original research leading to an acceptable doctoral dissertation.

CPSY 8943 Dissertation IV: 3 semester hours.

Independent and original research leading to an acceptable doctoral dissertation.

CPSY 8946 Internship I: 6 semester hours.

Internship is a full-time placement at a site approved and accredited by the American Psychological Association.

CPSY 8986 Internship II: 6 semester hours.

Internship is a full-time placement at a site approved and accredited by the American Psychological Association.

Criminal Justice Courses

CRJS 1111 Introductory Seminar in Criminal and Juvenile Justice: 1 semester hour.

An overview of the professional opportunities available in criminal justice, juvenile justice and related fields. Students will be introduced to the importance of professional relationship building, the value of internships, and the myriad professional job opportunities available in both juvenile and criminal justice.

CRJS 1123 Crime in America: 3 semester hours.

The course requires that students critically examine and analyze crime issues and trends in America. It includes presentations from active practitioners and researchers in the field of criminal justice on the current state of crime in America and an examination of offenders' rationale for crime. Students will express their ideas effectively through written, oral or visual means. They will compare emperical and quantitative data on typologies of crime, offenders and victims in America. The course addresses cultural and subcultural influences on crime, civic responsibility and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national and global communities toward crime prevention.

CRJS 1133 Principles of Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

Inquiry and evaluation of the principles, philosophy and history of criminal justice including the constitutional restraints imposed on criminal justice officials. Emphasis will be on the criminal justice officials' role in the prevention and control of crime and delinquency. Requires effective written, oral and visual expression of ideas. Students will compare emperical and quantitative data on typologies of crime, offenders and victims in America. The course addresses cultural and sub-cultural influences on crime, justice, civic responsibility and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national and global communities to understand crime and crime prevention.

CRJS 2113 Intro Geog Info Sys: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the fundamentals of Geographic Information System (GIS) and science and art of making maps. The course introduces students to the basic principles of using GIS as tool for managing and analyzing spatial data.

CRJS 2413 Police Systems and Practices: 3 semester hours.

A study of the structural aspects and principles of personnel management, program development, fiscal management, and other major components of police organization.

CRJS 2423 Introduction to Criminal Investigation and Identification: 3 semester hours.

A survey of scientific crime detection methods, the identification and presentation of evidence. Instrumentation, and crime report writing.

CRJS 2433 Police Community Relations: 3 semester hours.

An examination of various aspects of police- community relations. It includes the effects of various forms of policing styles on community dynamics, misperceptions and bias on the part of both communities and the police. Other topics include civil rights and civil liberties as they relate to law enforcement policy.

CRJS 2443 Introduction to Homeland Security: 3 semester hours.

The course will introduce students to the history of the Department of Homeland Security as a federal entity and homeland security as an area of study in the United States. It will include major research and theoretical perspectives that have resulted in significant initiatives to keep persons in the United States safe from various threats.

CRJS 2453 Introduction to Terrorism: 3 semester hours.

The study of the history and development of terrorism the various types of terrorism, including narcoterrorism, religious terrorism, state-sponsored terrorism and domestic terrorism. Emphasis will be placed on counter-terrorism program.

CRJS 2483 Introduction to Emergency Management: 3 semester hours.

This course presents the theories, principles, and approaches to managing both natural and man-made emergencies. The philosophy of Comprehensive Emergency Management will be discussed with the four attendant steps which include mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. An anlaysis of past disasters will be presented along with their impacts on policy formation leading up to the current FEMA all-hazards approach. The role, duties, an importance of the Emergency Manager will be discussed. Finally, legal issues involving emergency management will be presented.

CRJS 2513 Corrections: Systems and Practices: 3 semester hours.

An examination of the organization, administration and management of correctional facilities and programs in the United States. It includes a study of the populations served, sentencing structures and their outcomes for the individuals, families and communities involved.

CRJS 2523 Alternatives to Incarceration: 3 semester hours.

An examination of various correctional alternatives to incarceration including probation, parole, developments in the technological monitoring of offenders, and community-based reintegration and rehabilitation efforts.

CRJS 2613 Court Systems and Practices: 3 semester hours.

The legal procedures for arrest, complaint, presentation before the magistrate, grand jury consideration, indictment or waiver, arraignment, and the admissibility of evidence on these issues; pretrial matters, post-verdict motions, sentencing, and appeal.

CRJS 2643 Criminal Procedure: 3 semester hours.

An examination of the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Amendments regarding search and seizure, warrant requirements, the right to counsel, confessions, and the admissibility of evidence.

CRJS 2663 Evidence Law: 3 semester hours.

A study of Evidence Law with an emphasis on burden of proof, relevance, judicial notices, real and demonstrative evidence (including documents), the Hearsay Rule and its exceptions, privileges, unlawfully obtained evidence, and presumptions of guilt and innocence.

CRJS 2713 Juvenile Justice Systems: 3 semester hours.

An overview of the Juvenile Justice System including research and theoretical perspectives. It includes an in-depth study of the system and early decision-making process with focus on the police, the juvenile courts and the limits on juvenile sanctions. Community-based corrections with a historical perspective on juvenile probation and juvenile aftercare are also examined. A thorough working knowledge of institutionalization in terms of the treatment of juvenile offenders is provided.

CRJS 2723 Theories and Development of Juvenile Gangs: 3 semester hours.

This course is a comprehensive, in-depth coverage of historical and contemporary reactions to juvenile gangs. Among the key areas to be covered will be the legal and social definitions of juvenile delinquency, the theories, the social context, and the institutional responses. An understanding of public policy and its impact on juvenile gangs will complete the course.

CRJS 2743 Law of Juvenile Justice: 3 semester hours.

The course offers an examination of both substantive and procedural laws related to juvenile justice including criminal law, criminal procedure, evidence, and family codes. The course also examines the institutions that enforce these laws and the principal actors involved. Finally, the course examines current trends and projections in juvenile justice.

CRJS 2813 Computer Applications in Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the interface necessary for functioning effectively in various areas of criminal justice. The course also examines how the use of computers and related technology has changed the process of maintaining law and order nationally and internationally. It includes a review of social engineering techniques (ways that people might enhance personal and institutional security) and the field of computer forensics.

CRJS 3313 Policy Analysis: Prevention and Control: 3 semester hours.

A systematic examination of various crime control efforts involving primary and secondary prevention and the implementation of treatment programs.

CRJS 3463 Transnational Crimes: 3 semester hours.

The study of criminal behavior that transcends traditional national boundaries. The course will focus on the origins of these types of crimes and the efforts of law enforcement to address them. Cyber-terrorism, cyber-crimes, human trafficking, drug trafficking and patrimonial crimes will be reviewed.

CRJS 3623 Criminal Law I: 3 semester hours.

A study of basic principles of substantive criminal law which include definitions of crimes against persons. Emphasis is on the Texas Penal Code as it pertains to murder, capital murder, voluntary homicide, criminal negligence, homicide, and sexual offenses.

CRJS 3633 Criminal Law II: 3 semester hours.

A study of the basic principles of substantive criminal law which includes definitions of crime against property. Emphasis is on the Texas Penal Code related to arson, robbery, burglary, theft, forgery, embezzlement, and false pretense.

CRJS 3673 International and Federal Criminal Law: 3 semester hours.

The study of the origin purpose of international laws related to homeland security and terrorism and federal criminal law including crimes against persons, property crimes, principles, defenses and a comparison with state criminal law including the Texas Penal Code.

CRJS 3733 Juvenile Probation and Parole: 3 semester hours.

A survey and analysis of juvenile probation aftercare. The course addresses the history and legal aspects of probation, role and responsibilities of the juvenile probation officer including pre-sentence investigation reports, conducting risk assessment, case planning, caseload supervision, probation officer safety, professional ethics, and trends in the field.

CRJS 3823 Criminal Justice Research Methods I: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to research techniques such as formulating research questions, research design, and data collection methods such as surveys and case studies. The course also examines research ethics, locating data and navigating the special requirements for conducting research with protected populations such as incarcerated adults and juveniles. Students are also introduced to computer applications for research.

CRJS 3933 Minorities and the Criminal Justice System: 3 semester hours.

An analysis of problems frequently encountered by minorities in the American justice system. This includes police-minority confrontations, an examination of possible bias throughout various levels of the justice system and the contributions of minority criminal justice practitioners, scholars, and activists to the development of the field of criminal justice.

CRJS 4323 Criminal Justice Management Principles: 3 semester hours.

A study of basic criminal justice management theories and contemporary practices. This includes an examination of the unique behaviors, social skills and organizational techniques necessary for the criminal justice professional to be successful in various settings. Special attention is given to relating effectively with superiors, colleagues, subordinates and various members of the public impacted by criminal justice agencies.

CRJS 4416 Undergraduate Internship in Criminal Justice: 6 semester hours.

A student may be required to satisfactorily complete a minimum of three month's internship in an approved criminal justice setting preferably between the junior and senior year. This internship program is specifically designed to acquaint the student with practical aspects of criminal justice.

CRJS 4653 Constitutional Rights of the Criminally Accused: 3 semester hours.

A study of the rights of the criminally accused according to the United States Constitution.

CRJS 4833 Seminar: Criminal Justice Research Methods II: 3 semester hours.

Direction in performing an original research project. This involves an examination of how a choice of research question influences methodology. Basic statistical concepts and techniques for obtaining and analyzing large quantitative data sets will be reviewed. The course also examines techniques for conducting qualitative research and a familiarity with the latest qualitative research software packages.

CRJS 4913 Study of Criminal Justice Systems Abroad: 3 semester hours.

An analysis of criminal justice programs and institutions outside of the United States.

CRJS 4923 Criminology: 3 semester hours.

Focus will be a comprehensive analysis of the sociological, psychological and biological aspects of deviant human behavior.

CRJS 4943 Seminar: Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

Focus on recent significant and controversial issues which affect the administration of justice especially in law enforcement, the courts and corrections.

CRJS 4953 Seminar: Special Topics in Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

This course has a revolving theme from semester to semester. Theme areas include but are not limited to policing, courts, corrections, ethics, women and crime, economics and crime, white collar crime, terrorism, consensual crime, victimology, alternative dispute resolution, media influences and special topics in juvenile justice. (May be repeated once for credit as the course theme changes).

CRJS 4963 Philosophy of Crime: 3 semester hours.

An examination of religious and economic principles as they shape the definition and response to crime. This includes an analysis of specific concepts such as guilt, shame, care, love, desire and dignity on the evolution of deviance and crime across time and place in the western world.

CRJS 4973 Women and Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

An ideological and historical analysis of the role of women and criminal justice as reformers, professionals, scholars, and as offenders.

CRJS 4983 Ethical Decision-Making in Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

An overview of ethical theories, concepts, and issues. Illustrates the major unethical themes common in Criminal Justice management. Illustrates ethical dilemmas in policing, courts, prisons, community corrections, and crime prevention. The class works together to develop foundational ethical truths upon which to logically develop practice of moral decision making.

CRJS 4993 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research or fieldwork on selected topics.

Juvenile Forensic Psyc Courses

JPSY 5113 Psychology and the Juvenile Law: 3 semester hours.

Reviews the various areas, and ways, in which psychology interacts with the law and, in particular, the juvenile justice system. Explores topics such as psychological and psychiatric testimony, civil commitment, the rights of mental patients competency to stand trial, the insanity defense, the antisocial personality; trial child custody disputes and determinations, the psychology of the courtroom, and legal rules and regulations governing the practice of psychology. Considers the utility and the limitations of psychological expertise in relation to the legal system.

JPSY 5123 Psychology of Crime and Delinquency: 3 semester hours.

Focuses on the major psychological theories of criminal and aggressive behavior as they apply to juvenile delinquency. Viewpoints from cognitive, psychodynamic, psychoanalytic, behavioral, social learning, descriptive, and development psychologies are discussed and compared with current psycho-diagnostic classification systems. Case examples are used to illustrate the various theories.

JPSY 5223 Substance Abuse: 3 semester hours.

Provides a critical examination of various policy responses to the "Drug Program" in the United States based upon a review of selected empirical and theoretical studies. Includes an overview of drug usage by youth and adults and interrelationships between drug usage and juvenile crime.

JPSY 5233 Violence and Aggression: 3 semester hours.

Critical evaluation and examination of violence and aggression, their origins and determinants, and their impact on the individual and society. Application to the field of forensic psychology will be emphasized through the liberal use of clinical and research material.

JPSY 5253 Domestic and Family Violence: 3 semester hours.

Addresses types of family violence by examining the extent of the problem, factors contributing to violence, and the consequences of family violence upon the individual, family, community, and society. Emphasis is placed on prevention techniques, non-violent conflict resolution strategies, and programs and services for training and intervention.

JPSY 5263 Psychology and Treatment of the Juvenile Offender: 3 semester hours.

Addresses the psychological factors leading to the causes, assessment, classification, and treatment of juvenile delinquency. Examines both psychodynamic and developmental approaches, emphasizing neurotic, constitutional and psychopathological factors contributing to delinquency. Reviews the major psychological treatment approaches, with relevant case studies presented for illustrative detail. Analyzes legal and institutional responses to juvenile crime from the perspective of learning theory and developmental psychology. Discusses the role of the psychologist in the juvenile justice system.

JPSY 5413 Behavior Modification and Learning Theory: 3 semester hours.

Examines various psychological learning theories. Addresses principles of behavior modification, operationalizing and assessing behavior, specific behavior therapy techniques, the design and empirical evaluation of behavior change programs, and the application of behavior therapy to treat clinical disorders in youth.

JPSY 5423 Conflict Mediation/Resolution: 3 semester hours.

Examines the nature and uses of mediation as a conflict resolution method while taking into consideration the adversarial legal system. The course expands upon the variety of dispute resolution methods applicable to settings in families, neighborhoods, classrooms and juvenile justice agencies.

JPSY 5433 Counseling: 3 semester hours.

An-in-depth evaluation of counseling as it is applied in the juvenile justice and juvenile correction settings. Emphasizes a psychosocial approach to the study of behavior with priority given to immediacy. Explores various treatment models, interviewing, interpersonal communication, and crisis intervention.

JPSY 5443 Group Dynamics and Group Treatment: 3 semester hours.

Facilitates the understanding of the dynamics of small groups and larger organizations, emphasizing groups formed for the purpose of psychotherapy and rehabilitation of offenders, as well as the group dynamics of institutions designed to work with delinquent populations. Topics include leadership, role specialization, group formation and development, composition and goals, group violence, group resistance to change, and those factors that facilitate positive growth within groups.

JPSY 5453 Childhood Psychopathology: 3 semester hours.

A focus on the psychological treatment and prevention of select examples of childhood psychopathology. Emphasis will be placed on those disorders that result in contact with the criminal justice system. Child disorders will be selected from among the following diagnostic categories; conduct disorders, attention deficit disorders, borderline, and schizophrenic disorders. Emphasis will be placed on children who grow up under unusually stressful conditions or experience forms of serious psychological trauma early in life.

JPSY 5523 Introduction to Neuropsychology: 3 semester hours.

Surveys the field of neuropsychology, including its relevant underpinnings, its place within traditional and forensic settings, and practical applications in the areas of assessment and rehabilitation of brain injury. This introduction examines brain-behavior correlates, psychological tests employed in the evaluation of nervous system trauma, and the common syndromes affiliated with such injury.

JPSY 5533 Social Psychology and the Legal System: 3 semester hours.

Applies social psychological knowledge to the juvenile justice system. Places special focus on topics such as social psychology of justice institutions, environmental psychology, socialization into roles and identity, collective behavior, research on juries, attitude formation and change, and criminal identification.

JPSY 5763 Developmental Psychology: 3 semester hours.

Critical analyses of psychological development throughout the life span. Both cognitive and personality development will be considered from various theoretical perspectives as well as from empirical findings. Particular attention will be paid to the development of aggression in various states.

JPSY 5773 Psychology Seminar in Selected Topics: 3 semester hours.

Provides an opportunity for exploration of areas of forensic psychology not covered in other courses. The instructor, who may use projects and/or research articles, chooses topics.

JPSY 5783 Ethics: 3 semester hours.

The analytical and nonnative inquiry into the philosophical foundations of decisions. Emphasis is placed on understanding dilemmas faced by juvenile justice professionals.

JPSY 5843 Personality Assessment I: 3 semester hours.

Intelligence and Cognition. Provides practical experience in the evaluation of cognitive and intellectual functioning in children, adolescents, and adults. Focuses on the administration, scoring and interpretation of instruments such as the W AIS-R, the WISC-R, the WPPSI, and the Stanford Binet. Discusses general issues such as the nature of human intelligence and its measurement with explicit linkage to issues in forensic psychology. Required of externship option.

JPSY 5853 Personality Assessment II: 3 semester hours.

Objective Personality Assessment. Provides advanced experience in the administration and interpretation of objective personality tests such as the MMPI, MCMI, and CPI. Surveys the literature regarding the development and validity of objective measures of personality. Forensic applications of objective personality measures are discussed.

JPSY 5863 Clinical Interviewing: 3 semester hours.

Centers on the clinical interview as a means of gathering relevant life data, defining problems, and resolving conflicts. Surveys the theory and use of the interview, particularly as related to various counseling theories.

JPSY 5943 Research Methods: 3 semester hours.

Includes defining and specifying research problems; developing and testing hypotheses; the logic of causal inference; learning to use the variety of research designs; sampling procedures; the collection, processing, and storing of research data, and the ethics of research.

JPSY 5963 Applied Statistical Methods and Computing: 3 semester hours.

A study of descriptive and inferential statistics, measures of central tendency and variability, estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, simple and multiple regressions and nonparametric methods. Students learn the use and value of each statistic while using SPSS as a problem-solving tool.

JPSY 5973 Field Work in Psychology: 3 semester hours.

Provides supervised experience assisting psychologists in the assessment, management, and treatment of patients. Students work in an applied institutional setting, such as a juvenile facility, special treatment clinic, hospital, or rehabilitation setting. Training includes interviewing, taking case histories, observations, and staff and case conferences. This field work course provides supervision and experience with emotionally disturbed pre-delinquent and delinquent children in institutional, school, and community settings. Develops skills in evaluation and treatment of such youths. Field work training is supplemented by conferences with a faculty advisor.
Prerequisites: JPSY 5853.

JPSY 5983 Thesis: 3 semester hours.

Independent and original research leading to an acceptable master's thesis. Required of thesis option.

Juvenile Justice Courses

JJUS 5113 Foundations of Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

An in-depth examination of the history and origin of the American criminal justice system as it relates to contemporary issues in the United States.

JJUS 5123 Foundations of Juvenile Justice: 3 semester hours.

An examination of the juvenile justice system: History, structure, and interrelationships among law enforcement, juvenile and adult courts, and juvenile corrections. Includes an exploration of federal, state, county, and local laws and programs; emphasizes case and statutory law, constitutional procedures, and the philosophy of parens patriae. Required of all MSJJ students.

JJUS 5223 Substance Abuse: 3 semester hours.

Provides a critical examination of various policy responses to the "drug problem" in the United States based upon a review of selected empirical and theoretical studies. Includes an overview of drug usage by youth and adults and the relationship between drug usage and juvenile crime.

JJUS 5233 Community Structure and Problems: 3 semester hours.

Explores political and management structures and their relationships to a variety of community factors, including: community size and makeup; social stratification or levels of visibility between those of lower, middle, and higher socioeconomic status; and relative availability of goods and services, including those of helping agencies. Additionally, the relationships among race, ethnic, gender diversity and delinquency will be examined. Finally, political, social policy, and organizational behavior, as they affect community structures, poverty, unemployment, crime, racism, ethnocentrism, and sexism will be examined.

JJUS 5243 Community Building and Organizing: 3 semester hours.

Includes an understanding of theories, methods of analysis, and techniques of intervention employed in pursuing community change. By studying juvenile justice agencies, child helping programs and organizations in the community, a special emphasis is placed on juvenile crime prevention. Techniques for the empowerment of people, problem solving, community building, discovering resources within the community and issues of volunteering are addressed.

JJUS 5253 Domestic and Family Violence: 3 semester hours.

Addresses types of family violence by examining the extent of the problem, factors contributing to violence, and the consequences of family violence upon the individual, family, community, and society. Emphasis is placed on prevention techniques, non-violent conflict resolution strategies, and programs and services for training and interventions.

JJUS 5413 Economic Life and Juvenile Crime: 3 semester hours.

Provides a foundation of economic analysis as it applies to juvenile crime and delinquency; elements of supply/demand, elasticity and economic choice theory, production, cost and output determination under different market conditions, resource pricing, labor market and job search are examined. Additionally, issues of national income, output determination, unemployment, inflation and elements of monetary and fiscal policies, income distribution and poverty are addressed.

JJUS 5423 Conflict Mediation/Resolution: 3 semester hours.

Examines the nature and uses of mediation as a conflict resolution method while taking into consideration the adversarial legal system. The course expands upon the variety of dispute resolution methods applicable to settings in families, neighborhoods, classrooms and juvenile justice agencies.

JJUS 5433 Correctional Programming: 3 semester hours.

Reviews the broad range of correctional programming options in the field of juvenile justice. Presents the theoretical foundations and empirical research that illuminates the most effective correctional programming of reducing juvenile delinquency and offending recidivism.

JJUS 5523 Management of Juvenile Justice Organizations: 3 semester hours.

An examination of management and leadership principles as they apply to juvenile justice organizations and agencies. A special focus is placed on the study of government and nonprofit agencies.

JJUS 5763 Theories of Delinquency: 3 semester hours.

An in-depth analysis of selected theories of crime causation. Readings will include theories chosen from the sociological, economic, psychological, and biological literature. Required of all MSJJ students.

JJUS 5773 Juvenile Law Pract: 3 semester hours.

An examination of juvenile law. The course is designed to give the student a better understanding of the law as it relates to the juvenile justice system and its process. Special attention is placed on Texas and U.S. Supreme Court cases.

JJUS 5783 Ethics: 3 semester hours.

The analytical and normative inquiry into the philosophical foundations of decisions. Emphasis is placed on understanding dilemmas faced by juvenile justice professionals.

JJUS 5913 Special Topics in Juvenile Justice: 3 semester hours.

A seminar designed to allow flexibility in master's student degree plans and to promote awareness and understanding of issues in Juvenile Justice as these develop.

JJUS 5943 Research Methods: 3 semester hours.

Includes defining and specifying research problems; developing and testing hypotheses; the logic of causal interference; learning to use the variety of research designs; sampling procedures; the collection, processing; and storing of research data; and the ethics of research.
Prerequisites: JJUS 5123 and JJUS 5763.

JJUS 5963 Applied Statistical Methods and Computing: 3 semester hours.

A study of descriptive and inferential statistics, measures of central tendency and variability, estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, simple and multiple regression and nonparametric methods. Students learn the use and value of each statistic while using SPSS as a problem-solving tool.
Prerequisites: JJUS 5123 and JJUS 5763 and JJUS 5943.

JJUS 5973 Policy Analysis and Progam Evaluation: 3 semester hours.

Examines theories and methods of policy analysis and program evaluation relevant to juvenile justice agencies. Identifies the complex effects of policy change as well as techniques for developing a continuous capacity for program assessment in these agencies.

JJUS 5986 Thesis: 6 semester hours.

Independent and original research leading to an acceptable master's thesis.

JJUS 7113 Juv Just Issu Pract: 3 semester hours.

Includes the history of juvenile justice, an overview of juvenile justice agencies and process, and an introduction to issues and trends in the field of juvenile justice. Introduces major questions and problems within the field of juvenile justice and juvenile crime prevention.

JJUS 7623 Seminar in Grant Writing: 3 semester hours.

Develops skills needed to become successful grant writers. Delves into methods of discovering funding sources. Explains problem definition and formulation, identifying target populations and risk factors, provision of background literature, goals and objectives, development of study design, budgeting, staffing and developing job descriptions and evaluative strategies.

JJUS 7643 Management and Administration: 3 semester hours.

Examination of management and administrative thought and practice as these relate to public agencies and private organizations of juvenile justice and youth and child service.

JJUS 7653 Seminar on Juvenile Corrections: 3 semester hours.

Examination of juvenile corrections in Texas and the nation, including the Texas Youth Commission, the Texas Juvenile Probation Commission, county probation departments, juvenile parole, and private agencies. Discusses historical and national juvenile correctional trends.

JJUS 7661 Juvenile Justice Statistics Lab: 1 semester hour.

A one-hour course which must be taken in conjunction with JJUS 7963 Advanced Statistical Techniques in Juvenile Justice I.
Co-requisite: JJUS 7963.

JJUS 7673 The Juvenile Offender and Youth Gangs: 3 semester hours.

Explores the nature and extent of juvenile crime. Also considers the socialization of children, the creation of childhood and crime as social constructs, and the etiology of juvenile offending.

JJUS 7683 Philosophy of Punishment: 3 semester hours.

Concentrates on questions of personal blame and individual, moral, and legal accountability. Compares classical views of punishment with the restorative justice perspective. Aspects of punishment considered are definitions of punishment, philosophical justifications for punishment, and punishment as a component of culture. Reviews the implications for criminal and civil liability of key concepts such as free will, voluntary action, omission, negligence, recklessness, compulsion, insanity, and excuse. Seeks guidance from penal and civil codes, judicial decisions, legal doctrines, and philosophical perspectives.

JJUS 7693 Qualitative Methods in Social Sciences: 3 semester hours.

Familiarizes students with the nature and utility of qualitative fieldwork in various areas of criminological research, emphasizing areas of juvenile justice.

JJUS 7713 Special Topics in Juvenile Justice: 3 semester hours.

A seminar designed to allow flexibility in doctoral student degree plans and to promote awareness and understanding of issues in Juvenile justice as these develop.

JJUS 7753 Demographics and Juvenile Justice: 3 semester hours.

Delves into value systems of major minority groups and disenfranchised persons in the United States. Considers over-representation of these groups as victims of juvenile crime and in Juvenile Justice System processing, and their under-representation in the ranks of professionals and practitioners in the juvenile justice system. Also deals with strategies of change promotion and discusses the ecology of juvenile crime.

JJUS 7763 Seminar on Juvenile Processing by Police and Courts: 3 semester hours.

Considers the processing of juvenile offenders by the juvenile justice system, with a special emphasis upon the juvenile offender's contacts with police officials and with the criminal courts. Compares and contrasts the processing of accused juveniles with the processing of accused adults.

JJUS 7773 Theories of Crime and Delinquency: 3 semester hours.

Examines the historical development of theories of crime and delinquency. Deals with explanations of the etiology of crime which derive from the paradigms of the varied social, psychological, and biological disciplines.
Prerequisites: JJUS 5763.

JJUS 7783 Legal Aspects of Juvenile Justice: 3 semester hours.

Includes a study of the legal issues which commonly face administrators, managers, and employees of the juvenile justice system. Delves into public employment law, civil rights laws, and juvenile laws relating to the efficient functioning of agencies, and protections from lawsuits. Considers federal law and U. S. Supreme Court decisions relating to the legal rights of children as well as to the functioning of the juvenile justice system. Covers substantive and procedural issues relating to juvenile crime and delinquency. Compares and contrasts legal factors relating to juveniles with those relating to adults.

JJUS 7853 Prevention and Treatment of Crime and Delinquency: 3 semester hours.

Exploration and explanation of the theoretical development of juvenile crime prevention and treatment. The historical growth of juvenile crime prevention and models of juvenile crime control, community action programs, mentoring programs, and technology systems are examples of topics treated.

JJUS 7863 Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation: 3 semester hours.

Explores theories and methods of organizational change with suggested applications to agencies and organizations related to the juvenile justice and criminal justice systems. Identifies methods of developing a continuous capacity for change in juvenile justice and criminal justice agencies. Discusses evaluation methodologies.

JJUS 7873 Advanced Seminar in Crime and Delinquency Theory: 3 semester hours.

Emphasizes analytical, critical evaluation of theory, particularly contemporary versions. Assumes that the student is knowledgeable of each of the major arguments for the causes and correlates of crime. Theory development, theory integration and techniques of theory construction will be examined.
Prerequisites: JJUS 7773.

JJUS 7943 Advanced Research Methods I: 3 semester hours.

Examines research designs most useful to juvenile justice problems. The primary focus is on quasi-experimental and survey methodologies, with discussion of data collection methods and construction of questionnaires, as well as validity and reliability.
Prerequisites: JJUS 5943.

JJUS 7953 Advanced Research Methods II: 3 semester hours.

Examines research design problems in juvenile justice at an advanced level; use of sophisticated classical research designs and data-gathering techniques; analysis of problems related to sampling theory and procedures; application of mathematical models to problems in research design and analysis; use of techniques permitting causal inferences.
Prerequisites: JJUS 7943 and JJUS 7963.

JJUS 7963 Advanced Statistical Techniques I: 3 semester hours.

Discusses nonparametric and parametric statistical techniques including various ordinal tests, multiple regression, logistic regression, discriminate analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, canonical correlation, factor analysis, cluster analysis, and multidimensional scaling.
Prerequisites: JJUS 5963.

JJUS 7973 Advanced Statistical Techniques II: 3 semester hours.

Includes a survey of reliability analysis, log linear, and log it log linear analysis, nonlinear, weighted and two stage least-squares regression, profit analysis, time-series and survival analysis, and Cox regression.
Prerequisites: JJUS 7963.

JJUS 8913 Dissertation I: 3 semester hours.

Independent and original research leading to an acceptable doctoral dissertation. May be repeated.

JJUS 8923 Dissertation II: 3 semester hours.

Independent and original research leading to an acceptable doctoral dissertation. May be repeated.
Prerequisites: JJUS 8913 (may be taken concurrently).

JJUS 8933 Dissertation III: 3 semester hours.

Independent and original research leading to an acceptable doctoral dissertation. May be repeated.
Prerequisites: JJUS 8923 (may be taken concurrently).

JJUS 8943 Dissertation IV: 3 semester hours.

Independent and original research leading to an acceptable doctoral dissertation. May be repeated.
Prerequisites: JJUS 8933 (may be taken concurrently).

Psychology Courses

PSYC 1113 General Psychology: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to fundamental psychological concepts derived from the application of scientific method to the study of behavior.

PSYC 2423 Developmental Psyc: 3 semester hours.

This course surveys the content, theories and methods used by developmental psychologists to study child and adolescent development. Topics covered will include conception, genetics, prenatal development and physical, motor, perceptual and social development from infancy to early adolescence. Theories of social and cognitive development will be covered.
Prerequisites: PSYC 1113.

PSYC 2513 Personality: 3 semester hours.

Personality theories, major concepts, methods and problems in the field of psychology. Analysis of theories of personality, with emphasis on personality development in the normal population. Evaluation of theories in the field of psychology. The development of personality as a pattern of strivings manifested in interpersonal relations. The coverage of constitutional, psychological, social and cultural factors in the development and adjustment of the normal individual.

PSYC 2613 Fundamental of Statistics: 3 semester hours.

Introduces basic statistical concepts and the relevance of statistics in the every day life. Explores the fundamentals of descriptive statistics, elementary probability and sampling methods, and distributions. The student will be introduced to computer applications such as Statistical Package for the Social Sciences.

PSYC 3223 Abnormal Psychology: 3 semester hours.

Disorders in personality and behavior are emphasized. Examines organic and functional types of psychological abnormality. Some emphasis is given to the ways in which personality may become disordered. Evidence and theories on causation are considered together with the challenges of treatment.

PSYC 3233 Testing: 3 semester hours.

Study of human learning with particular attention to applications in the classroom. Includes laboratory experience in the use of the standardized school tests and practice in devising teacher-made tests. Emphasis is on original research literature and on individual projects.
Prerequisites: PSYC 2613.

PSYC 3313 Psychology of Learning: 3 semester hours.

This course will introduce you to the experimental analysis of learning and behavior. This course will examine the importance of basic learning mechanisms in understanding animal and human behavior, as well as the application of learning theory to real-world examples, will be stressed.
Prerequisites: PSYC 1113.

PSYC 3323 Social Psychology: 3 semester hours.

This course provides students with a survey of the topics covering the social bases of behavior. This course will examine some of the historical and philosophical foundations of social psychology, as well as theories and models of various social phenomena.
Prerequisites: PSYC 1113.

PSYC 3433 Experimental Psyc: 3 semester hours.

Principles of experimental design, evaluation of research procedures, training in the use of standard apparatus, and repetition and extension of selected classical experiments in psychology.

PSYC 3513 Human Diversity: 3 semester hours.

Examines psychological explanations of the major dimensions of human diversity including race, ethnicity, culture, gender, age and sexual orientation.
Prerequisites: PSYC 1113.

PSYC 3533 Socio Cult Psyc: 3 semester hours.

A study of cultural comparisons of psychological processes with focus on societal, social influences of family, mass media, and socio-economic classes.

PSYC 3543 Hist Sys Psyc: 3 semester hours.

A survey of the theories and research paradigms comprised of the foundations of psychology and the impact of culture on practice and theory.

PSYC 3603 Health Psychology: 3 semester hours.

This course will examine the theoretical and research foundations of behavioral health and illness from a biopsychosocial perspective. Students will be introduced to different medical disorders and diseases and the implications for the psychological health and impact on psychological functioning of individuals with these disorders.

PSYC 3613 Stat For Psyc II: 3 semester hours.

Applies statistical techniques in the field of psychology. Covers the use of large and small samples for statistical inference, linear and multiple regression, time series models and forecasting, nonparametric methods, the chi square test for cell probabilities, and contingency tables. Statistical packages for the social sciences will be studied in depth.
Prerequisites: PSYC 2613.

PSYC 3703 Introduction to Forensic Psychology: 3 semester hours.

The course will focus on general principles and applications of forensic psychology. Students will gain an understanding of how research and theory can deepen understanding of participants and basic psychological processes in the legal system.

PSYC 3713 Psychology of Terrorism: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed to assist students in becoming more aware of factors that may contruibute to the development of terroristic attitudes and behaviors. Students will learn how to define terrorism and distinguish different kinds of terroristic groups, which include juvenile terrorist groups, racial supremacist groups, and foreign terrorist groups. Students will also learn about environmental, cultural, familial factors related to terroristic activity.

PSYC 3913 Indust Org Psyc: 3 semester hours.

A survey of the development and application of psychological principles related to the workplace environment to include leadership, motivation, industrial and organizational influences on behavior drawing upon research methods and major theories.

PSYC 4253 Clinical Psych: 3 semester hours.

A survey of counseling and interview techniques and use of psychological test findings in support of counseling procedures.

PSYC 4333 Special Topics in Psychology: 3 semester hours.

The study of specialized areas in Psychology. Topics vary by semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic varies.

PSYC 4411 Psychology Internship Supervision: 1 semester hour.

The Internship Course aims to provide students with an oppurtunity to acquire field experience with emphasis on psychological constructs and methodologies across diverse settings such as mental health services, community organizations, criminal justice venues, and business enterprises.
Prerequisites: PSYC 1113 and PSYC 2513 and PSYC 2613 and PSYC 3433.
Co-requisite: PSYC 3223.

PSYC 4413 Psychology Internship: 1-3 semester hour.

The Internship Course aims to provide students with an oppurtunity to acquire field experience with emphasis on psychological constructs and methodologies across diverse settings such as mental health services, community organizations, criminal justice venues, and business enterprises.
Prerequisites: PSYC 1113 and PSYC 2513 and PSYC 2613 and PSYC 3433.
Co-requisite: PSYC 3223.

PSYC 4443 Research Methods: 3 semester hours.

Work in designing and carrying on research projects both in laboratory and in more life-like situations. The use and understanding of appropriate statistical procedures are emphasized.
Prerequisites: PSYC 2613.

PSYC 4513 Cognitive Psyc: 3 semester hours.

This course is an overview of the theoretical and empirical aspects of cognition as they apply to knowledge acquisition, storage, transformation and use. Areas of study include visual and auditory recognition; attention and consciousness; working and long-term memory; mental imagery; language acquisition, production and comprehension and problem solving.
Prerequisites: PSYC 1113.
Co-requisite: PSYC 4613.

PSYC 4613 Physiological Psyc: 3 semester hours.

Neurophysiologic correlates and systems underlying behavior. Physiological processes underlying sensory-motor activity, motivation and learning.

PSYC 4633 Sensation Perception: 3 semester hours.

Examines the sensory processes, the relationship between physical stimuli and sensory/perceptual experience, and perceptual phenomena.
Prerequisites: PSYC 4613.

PSYC 4823 Reading & Research: 3 semester hours.

Offered when demand warrants. Seminar or projects on various topics in psychology.

PSYC 4843 Senior Paper: 3 semester hours.

An in-depth study of a specific research topic in psychology. An oral presentation is a requirement of the course.
Prerequisites: PSYC 2613 and PSYC 3433 and PSYC 3613 and PSYC 4443.

PSYC 4913 Psychology Research: 1-3 semester hour.

PSYC 4993 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Reading, research and/or field work on selected topics.