College of Business

Vision and Mission Statement

Vision Statement:

The Prairie View A&M University College of Business strives to be among the best regional business schools in the nation by empowering students from diverse backgrounds to reach their full potential.

Mission Statement:

The Prairie View A&M University College of Business provides students from diverse academic and socioeconomic backgrounds with education that helps them become business professionals and leaders who are ethical, entrepreneurial, productive, and prepared to succeed in the global economy. The College achieves excellence through quality teaching, research, service, and engagement with the business community.

Instructional Organization

Program Degree Offered
AccountingBBA & MS
FinanceBBA
General Business AdministrationMBA
ManagementBBA
Management Information SystemsBBA
MarketingBBA

Accreditation

All baccalaureate and the graduate degree programs are accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) International.

Program Learning Goals (BBA)

  • Program Goal 1: Mastery of Content. Graduates will demonstrate an ability to integrate and use knowledge from multiple business disciplines, and will demonstrate proficiency in their major area business discipline.
  • Program Goal 2: Ethics. Graduates will have an ethical perspective.
  • Program Goal 3: Global Perspective. Graduates will have a global perspective.
  • Program Goal 4: Communications. Graduates will demonstrate an ability to be effective communicators.

Academic Standards and Progress

Following admission to the College of Business, students who remain in good standing are eligible to enroll in 3000/4000 level courses as long as they maintain a cumulative grade point average of a 2.30 or better.

Students must earn a grade of a “C” or better in all business courses presented for graduation except those courses used as unrestricted electives.

Transfer Credit

Prairie View A&M University has formal agreements with several area community colleges for course transfer to ensure a smooth transition for students with an associate’s degree to a baccalaureate degree program. The College of Business will generally accept credit for only freshman and sophomore level courses from community colleges which may be applied to the student's respective degree plan.  For additional details, contact the Department Head or Dean.

Community/Junior College Transfers

Community/Junior college students who plan to transfer to the College of Business are advised to pursue courses recommended for the freshman/sophomore years as outlined in this section. Upper division (3000/4000 level) courses taught in the College of Business should not be taken at a community/junior college. The College has formal agreements with several area community colleges for course transfer to ensure a seamless transition to a baccalaureate degree program.

Admission to the College of Business

First-time freshman who meet the University admissions requirements enter the College of Business as Pre-Business students. Transfer students from other Prairie View A&M University departments and colleges must be in good academic standing and have a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of a 2.30 or higher to enter the College of Business as Pre-Business students.

Transitioning from Pre-Business to Business requires:

  1. Satisfactory completion of at least 45 semester hours from the courses listed in the recommended course sequence for the freshmen/sophomore years in their respective disciplines, including the ten admissions requirement courses listed below.
  2. Earned cumulative grade point average of 2.30 in all credit course work.
  3. Completion of the following courses with a grade of “C” or better.
    ENGL 1123
    ENGL 1133
    Freshman Composition I
    and Freshman Composition II
    6
    MATH 1113
    MATH 1153
    College Algebra
    and Finite Mathematics
    6
    ACCT 2113Financial Accounting3
    MISY 1013Info & Communication in the Digital Age3
    ECON 2113
    ECON 2123
    Principles of Microeconomics
    and Principles of Macroeconomics
    6
    MGMT 1013Introduction to Business3
    MGMT 2000Prof Development for Business0
  4. Earned Admission Requirement Cumulative Grade Point Average (ARGPA) of 2.30 in the ten admissions requirement courses listed above; students must earn a grade of a “C” in the above-listed courses.
  5. Pass the THEA with the following minimum scores: Reading (230), Writing (240), and Math (230). The minimum requirements for the THEA test does not apply if a student is THEA-exempt.
  6. Satisfactory performance on the College of Business Quantitative Literacy (math) Assessment when available.
  7. Recommendation of a College of Business Advisor.
  8. Approval of the Department Head and Dean.

Students in Good Standing

Students entering the College of Business after the fall 2010 semester must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.30 or higher to remain in good standing. Failure to maintain a CGPA of 2.30 or higher may result in a student being placed on probation. Pre-Business students may be dismissed from the College of Business if their cumulative grade point average (CGPA) drops below 2.00 in one semester.

Pre-Business students may be restricted from taking any 3000-level or 4000-level College of Business courses.

All students (Pre-Business and Business majors) who have entered the College of Business must maintain a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 2.30 or higher in order to be in good standing in the academic program. Failure to maintain a CGPA of 2.30 or higher may result in students being placed on probation or dismissed from the College of Business.

The minimum cumulative GPA requirement to receive a Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) from the College of Business is a 2.30.

Instructional Organization

The College offers the Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.) degree program with five majors or areas of specialization: Accounting, Finance, Management Information Systems, Management, and Marketing.

Honor Societies, Professional and Service Organizations

Business students are encouraged to participate in professional organizations and honor societies. These organizations provide opportunities for students to develop professional skills, e.g., team work, planning, organizing, leadership, and communication. The following organizations are open to business majors. In addition, discipline-specific professional organizations are usually open to all students at Prairie View A&M University and are discussed in the department sections of the catalog.

Beta Gamma Sigma is an International honor society in business for AACSB-accredited schools. The top 10 percent of juniors and seniors and the top 20 percent of graduate students are selected and invited to join.

The Dean’s Student Advisory Council is composed of the president and one selected representative from each College of Business professional organization. Other students may be invited by the Dean to join. The Council serves as a liaison between the Dean and business students.

Enactus (formerly Students in Free Enterprise) is a nonprofit organization that gives students the tools to learn the free enterprise system in a real working situation. Enactus challenges students on more than 800 college campuses nationwide to take what they’re learning in the classroom and use their knowledge to better their communities.

Voices of Distinction, the Prairie View A&M University chapter of Toastmasters International offered through the College of Business. The club offers students an opportunity to improve their public speaking skills.

Probation

Student admission required GPAs (ARGPA)s and cumulative GPAs (CGPA)s will be reviewed at the conclusion of each fall and spring semester after final grades have been posted. The ARGPA is comprised of the ten admission requirement courses:

ENGL 1123Freshman Composition I3
ENGL 1133Freshman Composition II3
MATH 1113College Algebra3
MATH 1153Finite Mathematics3
MISY 1013Info & Communication in the Digital Age3
MGMT 1013Introduction to Business3
ACCT 2113Financial Accounting3
ECON 2113Principles of Microeconomics3
ECON 2123Principles of Macroeconomics3
MGMT 2000Prof Development for Business0

 
A Pre-Business student whose ARGPA is below 2.30 at the end of the fall and/or spring semester may be placed on probation and a registration hold may be placed on student’s accounts The hold will not be removed until the student completes their probationary period obligations.

A Business student who has a CGPA below 2.30 may be placed on probation and a registration hold may be placed on the student’s account. The hold will not be removed until the student completes their probationary period obligations.

If the ARGPA (for Pre-Business students) or CGPA (for Business students) falls below a 2.30 at the conclusion of the fall or spring semester following a probationary period, the student may be dismissed from the College of Business.

Probationary Period Obligations

Pre-Business students may be subject to the following during the probationary period:

  1. Students will have two consecutive semesters (not including the summer semester) to improve their ARGPA to a 2.30 or higher. In order to successfully improve their ARGPA, students may be advised to repeat some or all failed (admission requirement) courses.
  2. Students may be restricted to enroll in a maximum of 15 hours (SCH).
  3. If the CGPA or ARGPA of a 2.30 or higher is achieved during the two semesters following probation or at the conclusion of the probationary period, the probation will be lifted and the hold removed from the students’ accounts.

Business majors may be subject to the following during the probationary period:

  1. Students will have two consecutive semesters (not including the summer semester) to improve their CGPA to a 2.30 or higher. Students may be advised to repeat some or all failed College of Business courses.
  2. Students may be restricted to enroll in a maximum of 15 SCH.
  3. If the CGPA of 2.30 or higher is achieved during or at the conclusion of the probationary period, the probation will be lifted and the hold removed from the students’ accounts.

Dismissal

Students are only allowed one probationary period during their matriculation within the College of Business. A student may be dismissed from the College of Business if any of the following applies:

  1. Following the conclusion of the probationary period, an ARGPA of 2.30 or higher is not achieved.
  2. Following the conclusion of the probationary period, a CGPA of 2.30 or higher is not achieved.
  3. The CGPA is below 2.30 at the conclusion of any semester (for all students).

Upon dismissal, a registration hold will be placed on the student’s account. In order to get the hold removed, the student must change his/her major to a non-Business area. Dismissed students who have not completed College of Business requirements may not be eligible to receive a Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.) degree from the College of Business.

If dismissed, a student will have the right to appeal to the Dean in writing within 30 days of receiving a notice of dismissal.

Special Programs

Double Majors

Students enrolled in baccalaureate degree programs in the College of Business who elect to complete requirements of two majors will be awarded the B.B.A. degree with a double major. (See requirements for a second baccalaureate degree under the Academic Information and Regulations section.)

Certification in Entrepreneurship

This is a special program designed to enable non-business as well as business majors to gain functional knowledge and skills in business in order to become successful entrepreneurs.

Minor Fields of Study

All students are encouraged to complete a minor in a field other than their major to enhance the value of their baccalaureate degree. See the next section for details on the minors offered by the College of Business. 

Internships and Cooperative Education

Opportunities for practical experience in the business world are available through the co-op and/or internship programs. Eligibility for these structured work experiences include, but are not limited to, sophomore or higher standing with a minimum grade point average of a 2.50 as well as satisfactory completion of a few business courses as indicated by the Department Head.  Students can enroll in one of several elective courses offered to earn credit for their internship experience.

Minor Fields of Study

Students are strongly encouraged to add minors to broaden their knowledge base and improve their chances in the workplace.  The College offers minors in the following nine areas:

  • Accounting
  • Business Administration (Management)
  • Economics
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Finance
  • International Business
  • Personal Financial Planning
  • Management Information Systems 
  • Marketing
  • Real Estate
  • Supply Chain Management

The course requirements for each minor area are listed under their respective departments.

Business students are encouraged to minor in a business field other than their major field of study. For business students interested in adding a minor in another business area, 6 SCH from their major area may be counted towards the minor (receive dual credit). Consult the Department Head for specific minor requirements.

For non-business students taking a business minor, a grade of “D” may be acceptable in one business course provided the student has a GPA of 2.0 or higher. For junior- and senior-level courses, the College accepts credit only from a regionally-accredited four-year college or higher in the minor area.

The Business Administration (Management) minor is unavailable to business majors.

Graduate Programs in Business

The College of Business offers graduate programs leading to a Master of Business Administration (MBA) and a Master of Science in Accounting (MSA) for working professionals. The College of Business also offers an Executive MBA program leading to a Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree for professionals with managerial experience. The MBA and EMBA programs require the successful completion of a minimum of 36 semester credit hours (SCH) and the MSA degree requires the successful completion of a minimum of 30 SCH. There is no thesis option required in either of the programs.

The MBA degree program is also available online. The curriculum and program learning goals are identical to those of the courses delivered in the classroom. Some scheduling adjustments have been made to accommodate the online environment.

The EMBA degree program is designed for experienced professionals and managers who will benefit from understanding business principles they need to be successful in growing their own businesses, or advancing with their employers. Faculty and corporate mentors provide useful skills and a framework to craft a better business strategy as well as understand key tactical and strategic business challenges in a global economy.

Accreditation

The graduate degree programs are accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) International.

Admission Requirements

A student interested in the MBA, EMBA or MSA program must meet the general admission requirements outlined in the Graduate School section of this catalog. Admission to the Graduate School does not guarantee admission to a graduate degree program in the College of Business. The admission decision is based on a combination of factors including, Graduate Management Test (GMAT) or the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores, undergraduate cumulative GPA, an essay, an interview and professional work experience.

Mathematics and Computer Proficiency Requirements

Prior to enrolling in the MBA or MSA degree program, the student must have successfully accomplished at least six hours of college-level mathematics as evidenced on a student transcript or supporting documentation. In addition, the new graduate student must have successfully completed MISY 1013 or the equivalent course in computer literacy with a grade of “C" or better.

Regular (Degree-Status) Admission

An applicant may be admitted to the MBA or MSA degree program as a regular graduate student if he or she:

  1. Has an undergraduate degree from an accredited university. Students without a recent bachelor's degree in business or its equivalent may be required to completed additional coursework.
  2. Has a cumulative undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of 2.75 or better on a 4.0 scale or has a GPA of 2.75 or better for the last 60 earned hours of undergraduate credit.
  3. Achieves minimum required total score on the GMAT or GRE prior to enrollment.
  4. Submits an essay describing why he or she wants a graduate degree in business; the essay should not exceed 1,000 words.

Provisional Admission

Provisional admission to the graduate program may be granted to applicants who do not satisfy the above admission requirements. A student with provisional status may be required to complete additional coursework, retake the GMAT or GRE, and/or maintain a specific grade point average. General restrictions on the provisional status student are:

  1. The student must enroll in courses recommended by the Director.
  2. If the student’s GPA is below 2.45 on a 4.0 scale, he or she may be asked to supply additional information to support his or her application.
  3. The student may enroll for a maximum of 12 semester credit hours of graduate courses. To continue in the program, the student must be admitted to degree status prior to enrolling in more than 12 semester credit hours.
  4. A provisional student in the MBA degree program that does not have an undergraduate degree in business must during the first 12 semester credit hours include at least two of the following courses: MGMT 5113, ACCT 5003, or FINA 5003. A provisional student who has an undergraduate degree in business must during the first 12 semester credit hours must include ACCT 5103 and FINA 5103. The student may be exempted from selected courses if their undergraduate program contained subject matter equivalent to that required in the prerequisite course,
  5. A provisional student in the MSA degree program who has an undergraduate degree in accounting must during the first 12 semester credit hours include at least two of the core courses. A provisional student who does not have an undergraduate degree with a major in accounting must during the first 12 semester credit hours take prerequisite courses. The student may be exempted from selected courses if their undergraduate program contained subject matter equivalent to that required in the prerequisite courses.
  6. Submission of an essay describing why the student wants a graduate degree in business; the essay should not exceed 1,000 words.
  7. The maximum length of a provisional period is four academic semesters, counted from the time of the first enrollment.

A student with provisional admission may attain regular status if he or she:

  1. Maintains a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or greater during the first 12 semester credit hours.
  2. Has no more than one grade of “C.”
  3. Has no grade lower than “C.”
  4. Achieves minimum required total score on the GMAT or GRE prior to completing 12 semester credit hours.
  5. Is recommended for degree status by the Director and the Dean of the College of Business.

Academic Performance Standards

In order to show academic progress, a graduate business student must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher. A student with a cumulative GPA below 3.0 will be placed on probationary status, academic suspension or academic dismissal as described in the Academic Information and Regulation, General Academic section of this graduate catalog. A graduate business student is considered to be in good standing if he or she has:

  1. A cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  2. No more than two grades of “C” in core courses.
  3. No grade lower than “C” in core courses counted toward their graduate business degree.
  4. An approved degree plan.

Probationary Status

A student is placed on probation when his or her cumulative GPA falls below 3.0. A student can stay in probationary status for a maximum of 12 semester credit hours or two consecutive semesters.

Academic Suspension

A student who is on academic probation for more than two consecutive semesters, will be suspended from the program. A student under suspension cannot enroll in any course for one semester. A suspended student may request to return to the program by submitting a written petition to the Director of Graduate Programs in Business at least 30 days prior to the start of the semester in which they intend to return. In the petition the student must identify the problem(s) with their academic performance and steps intended to improve their academic performance. If the petition is approved, the student may return to the program in probationary status.

Academic Dismissal

After the second academic suspension, a student will be dismissed from the graduate business program. A dismissed student may request readmission to the program by submitting a written petition to the Director at least 30 days prior to the start of the semester in which they intend to return. The petition must identify the problem(s) with the student’s past academic performance and steps planned to improve future academic performance. Readmission to the program may be possible, but no specific time for a decision is established.

The Two-C Rule

A maximum of two “C” grades in core courses (or six SCH) will be accepted toward the graduate degree.

Repeating a Course (“C” or lower grade)

A student may petition to retake a course to improve a grade. Courses with a grade of “C” or lower may be repeated only once.

Transfer Credit

A new student may transfer a maximum of two courses (6 SCH) from an accredited institution by:

  1. Submitting an Approval for Transfer of Credits form to the Director of the Graduate Programs in Business.
  2. Submitting a (official catalog) description of the course to the Director.
  3. Submitting an official transcript showing a grade of "B" or better in the course(s).
  4. Obtaining written approval for the courses from the Director who will include the transferred hours in the Graduate Degree Plan.
  5. Transfer coursework will not be considered or applicable to the student's degree that will be more than six (6) years old at the time the degree is awarded.

A current student in good academic standing may transfer a maximum of six graduate credit hours from an accredited institution by:

  1. Attaining degree status and having a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better.
  2. Submitting the official catalog description of the transfer courses to the Director at least four weeks prior to enrollment. A course syllabus may be required.
  3. Obtaining written approval for the course by the Director prior to enrollment.
  4. Earning “B” or better in the course.
  5. Requesting that the university where the course was taken send an official transcript (showing the final grade) to the Director.
  6. Adhering the University guidelines and policies regarding the transfer of courses.

Admission to Candidacy and Degree Plan

Admission to the graduate business program does not constitute admission to candidacy. Admission to candidacy will be granted to a degree status student who has completed at least 12 semester hours of graduate credit with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or more. The student must submit an Application for Admission to Candidacy form.

The Application for Admission to Candidacy must be approved by the Director and the Dean. The approval of the Application for Admission to Candidacy is granted by the Dean upon approval from the Office of Graduate Programs. Failure to fulfill this requirement may prevent the student from enrolling in the next semester.

Master of Business Administration (MBA)

Degree Program

The MBA program provides students with the opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to succeed as managers, entrepreneurs, and business leaders. The program integrates various business disciplines to provide the high-quality educational experience needed for managing a business. In addition to emphasizing tools and techniques, the program strives to impart educational qualities that are conducive to a professional life of learning, growth, and ethical conduct. The goal of the program is to produce graduates who are capable of solving managerial problems in a dynamic national and global environment.

Program Learning Goals

  • Program Goal 1: Mastery of Content: Graduates will demonstrate an ability to think critically and to solve business problems.
  • Program Goal 2: Ethics: Graduates will effectively evaluate business ethical situations, incorporating the laws and standards relating to ethical corporate governance and the importance of personal integrity.
  • Program Goal 3: Global Perspective: Graduates will be proficient in handling global business issues, including the ability to tailor business practices to business practices have a global perspective.
  • Program Goal 4: Communications: Graduates will be effective communicators.

MBA Program Requirements

The MBA requires a total of 36 semester credit hours including 30 SCH of core courses and 6 SCH of electives assuming all prerequisites for the core courses have been satisfied. A student whose undergraduate program includes some subject content equivalent to the prerequisite courses may be exempted from selected courses. A student may also receive an exemption from specific prerequisite courses through examination or transfer. Specific course requirements will be determined during the admission process which includes a complete review of undergraduate transcripts and work experience.

Prerequisite Courses
ACCT 5003Concepts of Accounting3
ECON 5003Concepts of Economic Analysis3
FINA 5003Concepts of Finance3
MGMT 5113Business Statistics3
MRKT 5003Concepts of Marketing3
Total Hours15
Core Courses
ACCT 5103Managerial Accounting3
BCOM 5203Managerial Communication3
MISY 5103Management Information Systems3
ECON 5103Managerial Economics3
FINA 5103Theory of Financial Management3
MGMT 5103Organizational Behavior3
MGMT 5123Quantitative Analysis3
MGMT 5323Strategy and Policy3
MGMT 5433Production and Operations Management3
MRKT 5303Marketing Management3
Elective Courses6
Select two of the following:
International Trade and Business
Investment Analysis and Management
International Finance
FIN MRKT & Inst
Human Resource Management
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Special Topics
Data Com & Network
App Database Management
Info Syst Analysis
SP Topics in MISY
International Marketing
Total Hours36

Master of Science in Accounting (MSA)

Degree Program

The Master of Science in Accounting (MSA) degree is designed to provide advanced accounting preparation for careers in public, private and governmental accounting. The MSA will also prepare students to meet the Texas State Board of Public Accountancy prerequisites to the Uniform CPA Examination.

Program Learning Goals

  • Program Goal 1: Mastery of Content: Graduates will demonstrate an ability to think critically and to solve accounting problems.
  • Program Goal 2: Ethics: Graduates will effectively evaluate ethical situations that a CPA might face in a business setting, incorporating the laws and standards relating to financial reporting and the importance of personal integrity.
  • Program Goal 3: Global Perspective: Graduates will be proficient in handling global accounting issues, including the ability to tailor accounting practices to a global economy.
  • Program Goal 4: Communications: Graduates will demonstrate communication skills appropriate for high-level managers.

MSA Degree Program Requirements

The MSA requires a total of 30 semester credit hours (SCH) including 21 SCH of core courses and 9 SCH of electives. A student with a non-accounting undergraduate degree must complete some prerequisite courses with a grade of “C” or greater before he or she can be fully admitted to the MSA program; these courses cannot be used to fulfill the requirements of the MSA degree. A student whose non-accounting undergraduate program contained subject matter equivalent to that required by the prerequisite courses may be exempted from selected courses. A student may also be exempted through examination or transfer of approved credit. Specific program requirements will be determined during the admission process which includes a complete review of undergraduate transcripts and work experience.

Prerequisite Courses
ACCT 2113Financial Accounting3
ACCT 2123Managerial Accounting3
ACCT 3213Intermediate Accounting I3
ACCT 3223Intermediate Accounting II3
ACCT 3333Federal Income Tax I3
ACCT 4223Auditing3
Total Hours18
Core Courses
ACCT 5113Advanced Auditing3
ACCT 5123Accounting Information Systems & Controls3
ACCT 5133Accounting for Managerial Decision Making3
ACCT 5143Accounting Theory3
ACCT 5153Seminar on Tax Consulting, Planning and Research3
ACCT 5163Law & Ethics for Accountants3
BCOM 5203Managerial Communication3
Elective Courses
Select three of the following:9
International Accounting
Management Information Systems
Managerial Economics
International Trade and Business
Theory of Financial Management
Investment Analysis and Management
International Finance
FIN MRKT & Inst
Organizational Behavior
Quantitative Analysis
Human Resource Management
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Production and Operations Management
Special Topics
Data Com & Network
App Database Management
Info Syst Analysis
SP Topics in MISY
Marketing Management
International Marketing
Independent Study in Management
Total Hours30

Executive Master of Business Administration (EMBA)

The Executive MBA program is designed for experienced professionals and managers who would benefit from understanding business principles they need to be successful in either growing their own business, or moving up in their company. Faculty and corporate mentors provide useful tools and a framework for people who need to craft a better business strategy as well as understand some key business tools and philosophies. The EMBA program is fast-paced and rigorous; students receive a lot of information and are able to apply it immediately in their business environment. 

Program Learning Goals

  • Program Goal 1: Mastery of Content: Graduates will demonstrate knowledge, cognizance, analysis, and solution of managing diverse organizational challenges.
  • Program Goal 2: Ethical Leadership: Graduates will be cognizant of ethical challenges and leadership issues pertaining to a business environment.
  • Program Goal 3: Global Perspective: Graduates will develop knowledge regarding the global issues, practices, challenges so as to be successful leaders in a global economy.
  • Program Goal 4: Communications: Graduates will be effective rhetorical savvy so as to be compelling, persuasive, and influential in the management of modern corporations.

EMBA Requirements

Prospective students will need to have earned a bachelor's degree. Applicants must have at least three years of professional work experience for program consideration.  Applicants must complete an application for the program, submit three reference letters, an essay, a resume and pay an application fee. Applicants will also have to go through an interview with a member of the admissions committee. Given the professional work experience requirement, there is no GMAT or GRE requirement for admission to this program.

EMGM 5103Data Analysis for Managerial Decision Making3
EMCO 5203Executive Managerial Communication3
EMGM 5403Operations and Supply Chain Management3
EECO 5103Economics in the Global Environment3
EACC 5213Accounting for Executives3
EMRK 5433Marketing in a Global Environment3
EFIN 5103Topics in Corporate Finance3
EMGM 5503Business Ethics and Law3
EMIS 5513Information Technology and Organizational Value Creation3
EMGM 5303Executive Topics in Strategy and Policy3
EMGM 5113Executive Leadership3
EMGM 5903Capstone Project3
Total Hours36

Accounting for Executives Courses

EACC 5213 Accounting for Executives: 3 semester hours.

Managerial accounting within a global environment; covers advanced accounting tools, concepts, and techniques for decision making in a global environment.

Accounting Courses

ACCT 2110 Financial Accounting Laboratory: 0 semester hours.

Practical applications of financial accounting concepts and tools; problem solving exercises.
Co-requisite: ACCT 2113.

ACCT 2113 Financial Accounting: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the communication of relevant financial information to investors, creditors, and analysts with an emphasis on the accounting information cycle and the preparation of the three major financial statements: the balance sheet, the statement of income and retained earnings, and the statement of cash flows.

ACCT 2123 Managerial Accounting: 3 semester hours.

Instruction in the managerial decision-making functions using accounting information. Review of internal accounting information systems for planning, monitoring, and decision making with an emphasis on manufacturing cost, budgeting, product pricing, and CVP relationships.
Prerequisites: ACCT 2113.

ACCT 3213 Intermediate Accounting I: 3 semester hours.

The study of accounting principles and the preparation of financial statements with an emphasis on accounting theory, current and non-current assets, revenues and expenses and the time value of money.
Prerequisites: ACCT 2123.

ACCT 3223 Intermediate Accounting II: 3 semester hours.

A continuation of ACCT 3213 with an emphasis on accounting principles and financial statement preparation in the areas: investments, current and long-term liabilities, stockholders' equity, income taxes, leases, accounting changes, pensions, cash flow statements, earnings per share, and financial statement analysis.
Prerequisites: ACCT 3213.

ACCT 3243 Ethics for Accountants: 3 semester hours.

A study of the legal, regulatory and ethical issues of business with special emphasis pertaining to accounting.
Prerequisites: ACCT 2123.

ACCT 3313 Cost Accounting: 3 semester hours.

The fundamental costs of a manufacturing concern such as raw materials, labor cost, and overhead and the preparation of internal reports for managerial decisions in the areas: planning, control and budgets.
Prerequisites: ACCT 2123.

ACCT 3333 Federal Income Tax I: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the theory and fundamentals of federal income tax as applied to individuals, with an emphasis on individuals involved in business activities or organizations. Includes an introduction to tax research and professional communication of results.
Prerequisites: ACCT 2123.

ACCT 3343 Federal Income Tax II: 3 semester hours.

Covers federal income tax codes as they apply to proprietorships, partnerships and corporations. Also includes tax research.
Prerequisites: ACCT 3333.

ACCT 3393 Accounting Internship I: 3 semester hours.

Supervised full-time, off-campus training at accounting firms, private and public business organizations, governmental agencies, and not-for-profit organizations that requires individual conferences with a faculty member, performance evaluations from the work place, and written reports. The duration of the program will be one regular semester or two consecutive summer terms.
Prerequisites: ACCT 3213.

ACCT 3493 Accounting Internship II: 3 semester hours.

Supervised full-time, off-campus training at accounting firms, private and public business organizations, governmental agencies, and not-for-profit organizations that requires individual conferences with a faculty member, performance evaluations from the work place, and written reports. The duration of the program is one regular semester or two consecutive summer terms.
Prerequisites: ACCT 3213 and ACCT 3313.

ACCT 4133 International Accounting: 3 semester hours.

The course is designed to facilitate an understanding of the fundamental principles and practices of international accounting; includes an analysis of how different social, political, and economic backgrounds influence and interact with accounting, reporting and evaluation processes.
Prerequisites: ACCT 3213.

ACCT 4213 Advanced Accounting: 3 semester hours.

Study of accounting standards and procedures relative to business combinations, consolidated financial statements, foreign currency transactions, translation of foreign entity statements, segment and interim reporting, SEC reporting, and partnership operations.
Prerequisites: ACCT 3223.

ACCT 4223 Auditing: 3 semester hours.

The study of auditing concepts and procedures in the areas: auditing standards, internal control, professional ethics and responsibilities, audit evidence, audit documentation, and audit reports.
Prerequisites: ACCT 3223.

ACCT 4253 Oil & Gas Accounting: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to oil and gas accounting with emphasis on accounting for costs incurred in the acquisition, exploration, development, and production of oil and natural gas using full cost accounting methods; also covers joint interest accounting, gas pipeline accounting, required disclosures for oil and gas activities, and analysis of oil and gas companies; financial statements.
Prerequisites: ACCT 3213.

ACCT 4313 Accounting Information Systems: 3 semester hours.

Study of overall data flow systems emphasizing financial data and computerized systems of accounting. Covers flow and logic concepts and development of meaningful control concepts and data reporting techniques.
Prerequisites: ACCT 2123 and MISY 2013.

ACCT 4323 Fund Accounting: 3 semester hours.

Features of budgetary and fund accounting as applied to not-for-profit organizations such as colleges, universities and governmental units.
Prerequisites: ACCT 3223.

ACCT 4343 Financial Statement Analysis: 3 semester hours.

A study of financial statements in a variety of firm valuation contexts. The course provides various tools for evaluating a firm's accounting and financial performance, the concept of earnings quality, and other related issues.
Prerequisites: (ACCT 3213 and FINA 3103).

ACCT 4993 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Reading, research, and/or field work on selected topics. Prerequisite: Junior/senior classification and consent of instructor and department head.

ACCT 5003 Concepts of Accounting: 3 semester hours.

The review of basic accounting concepts and principles with an emphasis on the accounting cycle, financial statement preparation, and their applications in making managerial decisions in the areas of cost-volume-profit analysis, inventory management, and comparative cost allocation systems.

ACCT 5103 Managerial Accounting: 3 semester hours.

The interpretation and use of accounting data for management purposes in the areas of cost accounting, budgets, standards, production costing, distribution costing, and special analyses.
Prerequisites: ACCT 5003.

ACCT 5113 Advanced Auditing: 3 semester hours.

An advanced study of the practices and principles that guide the auditing environment. Specialty topics will be introduced as well as current readings in auditing literature.
Prerequisites: ACCT 4223.

ACCT 5123 Accounting Information Systems & Controls: 3 semester hours.

A study of the analysis, design, installation, and operations of an accounting information system. Emphasis will be placed on system design and acquisition.
Prerequisites: ACCT 5003.

ACCT 5133 Accounting for Managerial Decision Making: 3 semester hours.

A study of the preparation of internal reports for decision making, planning and control. Additional areas of study include cost determination, budgeting, and quantitative techniques.
Prerequisites: ACCT 5003.

ACCT 5143 Accounting Theory: 3 semester hours.

Development of the theory of accounting with particular emphasis on concepts, income measurement, valuation of assets, valuation and measurement of equities, and the application of accounting theory to contemporary problems.
Prerequisites: ACCT 3213.

ACCT 5153 Seminar on Tax Consulting, Planning and Research: 3 semester hours.

A study of current U.S. tax law with emphasis on the interrelationships between taxation and business and personal financial planning. Tax research, planning, and professional communications are significant components.
Prerequisites: ACCT 3333.

ACCT 5163 Law & Ethics for Accountants: 3 semester hours.

Regulatory, and ethical issues of business. Special emphasis will be placed on issues pertaining to accounting.
Prerequisites: ACCT 5003.

ACCT 5243 International Accounting: 3 semester hours.

Fundamentals, principles and practices of international accounting with emphasis on social, political and economic backgrounds that influence and interact with accounting, reporting and evaluation processes.
Prerequisites: ACCT 5103 or ACCT 5133.

ACCT 5993 Independent Study in Accounting: 3 semester hours.

Supervised readings, research and/or field work on selected topics in accounting. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and approval by the Department Head.

Business Communication Courses

BCOM 3303 Business Communication: 3 semester hours.

Development of best practices in business communication as it relates to the collection, organization, and preparation of business reports. Emphasis will be placed on techniques of collecting, interpreting and presenting information useful in a corporate setting.
Prerequisites: ENGL 1133 and MISY 1013.

BCOM 5203 Managerial Communication: 3 semester hours.

Applications of communications theory, human relations concepts, research methods, and information technology to the internal communication of the manager's work environment. Survey of the organizational communication climate, applications, oral and written reports.
Prerequisites: MGMT 5003.

Business Law Courses

BLAW 2203 Legal Environment of Business: 3 semester hours.

A survey of the U.S. legal system with an emphasis on aspects relevant to business operations. Topics include legal systems, constitutional law, criminal law, property law, torts, and basic contract law.

BLAW 2213 Business Law: 3 semester hours.

Covers topics including the U.S. Uniform Commercial Code, agency law, employment and discrimination law, and regulatory topics.
Prerequisites: BLAW 2203.

BLAW 2243 Law of Agency: 3 semester hours.

A study of law of agency including principle-agent and master-servant relationships, the authority of an agent, the termination of an agent's authority, the fiduciary and other duties of an agent, employment law, deceptive trade practices, listing or buying procedures, and the disclosure of an agency.
Prerequisites: BLAW 2203.

BLAW 5013 Legal Environment of Business: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the legal foundation of business and international business regulation. Examines legal topics including the laws on property, tort, contract, crime, consumers, agency, business organizations, employment and employment discrimination, and various regulatory areas.

Economics for Executives Courses

EECO 5103 Economics in the Global Environment: 3 semester hours.

The student will explore the global economy and its potential to affect management decision making. The course will focus on export, import, international trade, international finance, and micro and macro perspectives of the firm relating to the global economy. Highlights include study of the global economy, global market structure and policy, pricing in a global market, and the economics of multinational firms. The graduates will gain an awareness and skills important in negotiating contracts and agreements across national boundaries.

Economics Courses

ECON 2003 Fundamentals of Economics: 3 semester hours.

Designed for non-business majors, this course will synthesize, analyze and evaluate fundamental principles of micro and macroeconomics. Using basic quantitative and graphical tools. More specifically, students will: learn and use economics terminology; build economic models including the business cycle and supply and demand; analyze market structures and performance; evaluate government policies to reduce income in equality and environmental degradation; calculate measures of macroeconomic performance; analyze monetary and fiscal policy; and evaluate the consequences of globalization.

ECON 2113 Principles of Microeconomics: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the principle of microeconomics, which include supply and demand analysis, market equilibrium, production costs faced by firms, the production process, as well as the analysis of market structures, such as perfect competition and the monopoly firm.

ECON 2123 Principles of Macroeconomics: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of the principles and problems of money and banking, national income, public finance, international trade, and economic growth.

ECON 3313 Economic Development: 3 semester hours.

A study of the economic factors affecting economic growth and development. Emphasis is on experience of third world countries.
Prerequisites: ECON 2113 and ECON 2123.

ECON 3323 Public Finance: 3 semester hours.

An examination of the public sector and its contribution to economic welfare. An analysis of alternative forms of taxation and their impact on micro- and macroeconomic decision making.
Prerequisites: ECON 2113 and ECON 2123.

ECON 3343 Economic and Human Resources: 3 semester hours.

Examines population growth, poverty, discrimination, human resource development, and training and education. The course is oriented toward explaining the principles, effects, and policies related to each topic.
Prerequisites: ECON 2113 and ECON 2123.

ECON 4213 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of the principles governing price and output decisions of business firms and the allocation of resources under various market structures.
Prerequisites: ECON 2113.

ECON 4223 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of determinants of the aggregate level of employment, output and income of an economy.
Prerequisites: ECON 2113 and ECON 2123.

ECON 4303 Money and Banking: 3 semester hours.

Money, credit, commercial and central banking, financial intermediaries, treasury operations, monetary theory and policy, and foreign exchange.
Prerequisites: ECON 2123 and ECON 2113.

ECON 4343 International Trade: 3 semester hours.

Principles and practices of foreign trade with special emphasis on international economic relations. Analysis of foreign exchange, balance of payments, foreign investment, tariff history and policy, and currency problems.
Prerequisites: ECON 2113 and ECON 2123.

ECON 4353 Urban Economics: 3 semester hours.

Economic analysis of the major problems facing urban areas. Study of the theory of urban industrial and residential locations, including patterns of urban growth and development.
Prerequisites: ECON 2113 and ECON 2123.

ECON 4373 Economic Research: 3 semester hours.

Introduces the fundamentals of systematic social science research methods commonly used in economics and business disciplines. Includes problems of measurement, study design, sampling, reliability, validity, and ethical considerations.

ECON 4993 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Reading, research, and/or field work on selected topics.

ECON 5003 Concepts of Economic Analysis: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of supply and demand, production and cost functions, price and output determination under different market conditions, and resource pricing. Means of national income and output determination, and issues related to unemployment, inflation, business cycles, monetary and fiscal policies, economic development and growth, and the global linkage of national economies.

ECON 5103 Managerial Economics: 3 semester hours.

Economic theory and tools needed to make sound managerial decisions for optimal outcomes, theoretical and empirical demand functions, theoretical and empirical production and cost functions, profit maximization under different market conditions over time and under uncertainty, game theory, economics of information and government in the market place.
Prerequisites: ECON 5003.

ECON 5313 International Trade and Business: 3 semester hours.

Introduces the principles and practices of international trade emphasizing international business opportunities and challenges. Topics include overview of globalization, basic trade models, tariffs and quotas, labor and environmental controversies in trade, fundamentals of export marketing, economic integration in North America, and international business environment in major U.S. export markets.
Prerequisites: ECON 5003.

Entrepreneurship Courses

ENTR 3013 Economics for Entrepreneurs: 3 semester hours.

This course elaborates upon and applies economics principles, concepts and techniques useful to entrepreneurs. Topics include supply and demand, revenue management, cost minimization, profit maximization, pricing strategies, labor compensation strategies, game theory and competitive strategies, auctions, the macroeconomic environment, financing strategies, forecasting, and international trade and finance.
Prerequisites: MGMT 1013.

ENTR 3023 Diversity Entrepreneurship: 3 semester hours.

This course provides students with an understanding of the historical and contemporary state of women, ethnic (Asian, Middle Eastern and other immigrant groups) and minority (e.g. Black, Hispanic and Native Americans) entrepreneurs. Emphasis is given to how these groups develop ventures and create wealth.
Prerequisites: MGMT 1013.

ENTR 3033 Social Entrepreneurship: 3 semester hours.

Social Entrepreneurship, which refers to the use of business skills to develop innovative approaches to societal problems, will introduce the concept of social enterprises, the challenges unique to starting and growing them, the emerging capital markets for social ventures, the possible trade-offs in social and financial returns, and some unique expectations and challenging management decisions that are inherent in growing social enterprises.
Prerequisites: MGMT 1013.

ENTR 3093 Special Topics: 3 semester hours.

This course provides the flexibility of presenting a variety of contemporary topics of interest in entrepreneurship. The ever evolving business environment will present new entrepreneurial opportunities to serve customer needs, involving a variety of goods and services, such as oil and gas, telecommunications, medical services or real estate. Topics addressed in this course will vary depending upon student interest and the needs of the market.
Prerequisites: MGMT 1013.

ENTR 4043 New Venture Creation: 3 semester hours.

This is a hands-on capstone course that focuses on new venture creation and requires a feasibility analysis of the new organization. Working in teams, students will learn to identify, conceptualize, plan, finance, launch, manage and harvest the rewards of building a new venture. Students will be required to actually do all the planning, create the appropriate documentation and present the complete business plan as though it were going to start in the immediate future.
Prerequisites: MGMT 3333.

Finance for Executives Courses

EFIN 5103 Topics in Corporate Finance: 3 semester hours.

Integration of financial and economic theories to analyze and solve major financial problems facing corporations. Real and simulated cases will be analyzed. Covers topics such as capital budgeting, capital structure, mergers and acquisitions, bankruptcy and reorganization, and risk management.

Finance Courses

FINA 2103 Personal Financial Management and Planning: 3 semester hours.

Covers the basics of personal money management and financial planning which is essential for every citizen in life; topics covered include personal financial planning, savings and debt financing, investment in stocks and bonds, auto and home financing, insurance, retirement and estate planning.

FINA 3013 Fundamentals of Financial Planning: 3 semester hours.

This course prepares students for the business of financial planning. Issues covered include the financial planning process, client interaction, time value of money applications, personal financial statement construction and analysis, cash flow and debt management, ethical issues and considerations, and education planning.
Prerequisites: FINA 2103.

FINA 3023 Principles of Insurance: 3 semester hours.

Applications of fundamental principles of life, property, and casualty insurance, contracts, premiums, legal statutes, risk, and programming.
Prerequisites: ACCT 2123.

FINA 3103 Principles of Finance: 3 semester hours.

Fundamental tools and techniques applicable to financial planning of businesses. Covers valuation of securities, risk-return relationship, capital budgeting, management of current assets and liabilities with extension to international areas.
Prerequisites: ACCT 2123.

FINA 3113 Real Estate Principles: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the study of the economic and legal environment in which real property is transferred and used.
Prerequisites: ACCT 2123 and ECON 2113.

FINA 3223 Real Estate Finance: 3 semester hours.

The course introduces various aspects of real estste finance; covers all market sectors and funding sources with concentration on residential lending and secondary market for first mortgage loans; satisfies educational licensing requirement as prescribed by the Texas Real Estate License Act.
Prerequisites: FINA 3113.

FINA 3253 Real Estate Investments: 3 semester hours.

The course provides an introduction to real estate investments including analysis of real estate investment alternatives; feasibility and site analysis; tax considerations; income and expense analysis; disounted cash flow analysis; and profitability measurement.
Prerequisites: FINA 3113.

FINA 3333 Investment Analysis: 3 semester hours.

Survey of the risks and returns of investment media in relationship to the investment objectives of individual and industrial investors. Includes an examination of the capital markets, information flows, and analytical techniques in terms of their impact upon the valuation process.
Prerequisites: FINA 3103.

FINA 3383 Financial Markets and Institutions: 3 semester hours.

Domestic financial institutions and markets and their interaction in the flow of funds in the economy and the central bank and other regulatory institutions will be analyzed with an extension to international markets and institutions.
Prerequisites: FINA 3103 and ECON 2123.

FINA 3393 Finance Internship I: 3 semester hours.

Supervised full-time training in industry, government or other agencies for junior-level finance majors. Individual conferences, company performance evaluations and written reports required. The duration of the program will be one regular semester or two consecutive summer terms,
Prerequisites: FINA 3383.

FINA 4113 Retirement Planning and Employee Benefits: 3 semester hours.

The course provides students with knowledge of the different types of public and private retirement and benefit plans; specifics and operations of these plans are analyzed as well as their regulatory framework; application of these plans is stressed in such areas as needs evaluation and analysis, strategies for different life-cycle circumstances, and medical issues.
Prerequisites: FINA 3013.

FINA 4123 Estate Planning: 3 semester hours.

The course focuses on the efficient conservation and transfer of wealth, consistent with the client's goals; presents legal, tax, financial, and non-financial aspects of the process, covering such topics as wills, trusts, probate, advanced directives (living wills), charitable giving, wealth transfers and related taxes.
Prerequisites: ACCT 3333 and FINA 3013.

FINA 4213 Managerial Finance: 3 semester hours.

Issues and problems faced by financial managers with emphasis on financial analysis, capital budgeting, capital structure, dividend policy, and corporate restructuring.
Prerequisites: FINA 3103.

FINA 4303 Money and Banking: 3 semester hours.

Covers a wide spectrum of topics and issues in banking and finance, including the role and nature of money in the economy, bank management, technological innovations and the practice of banking, creation and regulation of the money supply and the institutions involved, monetary policies and the role of the Federal Reserve and Treasury Department.
Prerequisites: ECON 2123.

FINA 4313 Investment Management: 3 semester hours.

Principles of portfolio management, portfolio optimization, asset allocation, asset pricing models, investment strategies, and timing techniques portfolio performance evaluation.
Prerequisites: FINA 3333.

FINA 4343 Financial Statement Analysis: 3 semester hours.

A study of financial statements in a variety of firm valuation contexts. The course provides various tools for evaluating a firm's accounting and financial performance, the concept of earnings quality, and other related issues.
Prerequisites: (ACCT 3213 and FINA 3103).

FINA 4353 International Finance: 3 semester hours.

International financial markets and the flow of funds, exchange rates, parity relationships and arbitrage Exchange rate risk and its management. short- and long-term financing. asset and liability management. capital budgeting, and direct foreign investments for multinationals; international banking issues.
Prerequisites: FINA 3103 and ECON 2123.

FINA 4383 Derivative Securities: 3 semester hours.

Valuation of options and financial futures; risk management and hedging applications using options and futures; primary focus on stock options, index options, stock index futures, interest rate futures, foreign exchange futures options.
Prerequisites: FINA 3103.

FINA 4393 Finance Internship II: 3 semester hours.

Supervised full-time training in industry, government, or other agencies for senior-level finance majors. Individual conferences, company performance evaluations and written reports required. The duration of the program will be one regular semester or two consecutive summer terms.

FINA 4453 Special Topics in Finance: 3 semester hours.

Supervised fulltime training in industry, government, or other agencies for senior-level The course would provide a form to bring in special issues/topics of interest in the finance majors. Individual conferences, company performance evaluations and written reports required. The duration of area, such as hedge funds, speculative markets, mergers and acquisitions, and the program management of financial institutions. It will be one regular semester or two consecutive flexible in terms.
Prerequisites: ECON 2113 and ECON 2123 and FINA 3103.

FINA 4993 Independent Study in Finance: 3 semester hours.

Reading, research, and/or field work on selected topics.

FINA 5003 Concepts of Finance: 3 semester hours.

An overview of financial securities and markets, financial statement analysis, cash budgeting, working capital management, time value of money, valuation of securities, and capital budgeting.

FINA 5103 Theory of Financial Management: 3 semester hours.

Risk-return analysis, cost of capital, cash-flow analysis in capital budgeting, capital structure policy, dividend policy, corporate restructuring, and international financial management.
Prerequisites: FINA 5003.

FINA 5313 Investment Analysis and Management: 3 semester hours.

Fundamentals of investment, investment securities and markets, analysis of risk and return, fixed income securities and valuation, common stock and valuation, mutual funds, options and futures, portfolio theory and management.
Prerequisites: FINA 5003.

FINA 5333 International Finance: 3 semester hours.

International financial markets and the flow of funds, in risk management for multinationals, short- and long-term financing for multinationals, multinational capital budgeting, direct foreign investment, country risk analysis, and international banking.
Prerequisites: FINA 5003.

FINA 5383 FIN MRKT & Inst: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of the major financial markets, domestic and international, and their interrelationship through interest rates and prices, as well as flow of funds and price behavior of the market as a whole. Also, the role of financial institutions in the flow of funds and their regulation. Prerequisite(s): FINA 5003, ECON 5003 or equivalents.
Prerequisites: FINA 5003 and ECON 5003.

Management Information Systems Courses

MISY 1013 Info & Communication in the Digital Age: 3 semester hours.

The course explores living and communicating in a digital world. It includes selection and use of different types of computers, desktop and mobile, and their supported applications; an examination of the advantages and pitfalls of cloud computing and social networking; and projects designed to promote collaborative communication using multimedia and web technology with attention to formal and informal code of conduct.

MISY 2013 Fundamentals of MIS with SAP: 3 semester hours.

Overview of information systems including software and hardware issues, database management, enterprise systems, and organizational and managerial issues of fundamental business processes and functional areas, such as sales, production, accounting etc., and how they interact with an enterprise system; emphasis on hands-on learning using SAP.
Prerequisites: MISY 1013.

MISY 2123 Information Systems Applications: 3 semester hours.

An extension of MISY 1013. Includes case-based problems and management decision-making drills with alternative computer-based solutions structure. Extensive applications of contemporary microcomputer software packages to solve problems in functional areas of business. Recommended as an elective course for non-MISY majors.
Prerequisites: MISY 1013.

MISY 2153 Object-Oriented Programming Applications in Business: 3 semester hours.

This course covers the fundamental concepts of object-oriented programming as they apply to real-world business problems. Emphasis is given on the development of object-oriented program logic and design in solving programming problems in business.
Prerequisites: MISY 2013.

MISY 3323 Networking: 3 semester hours.

Specific topics include the introduction to core network concepts, network standards, physical layer propogation, Ethernet PC network, telephony and various LAN (Local Area Network) technologies, WAN (Wide Area Networks), internet working, wireless networking, network security, and network management.
Prerequisites: MISY 2013.

MISY 3393 Information Systems Internship I: 3 semester hours.

Supervised full-time training in industry, government or other agencies for junior-level information systems majors. Individual conferences, company performance evaluations and written reports required. The duration of the program will be one regular semester or two consecutive summer terms.
Prerequisites: MISY 2013.

MISY 3413 Business Database Applications: 3 semester hours.

The course provides a solid foundation in database concepts and design as they apply in business. It covers principles of conceptual as well as relational designs and includes translation of business requirements into entity relationship diagrams, normalization of tables and advanced SQL to address specific business problems.
Prerequisites: MISY 2013.

MISY 3423 Enterprise Systems Analysis and Design: 3 semester hours.

Methods, techniques, and tools involoved in information systems analysis and design and project management in enterprises with exposure to traditional methodologies like systems development life cycle, and alternative methodologies like object-oriented and agile methodologies; hands-on experience of analysis and design on enterprise systems, such as ERP.
Prerequisites: MISY 2013.

MISY 3433 JAVA Applications in Business: 3 semester hours.

The course covers the fundamental concepts of object-oriented programming (OOP) using Java language and emphasizes basic programming skills using hands-on practices. Intensive exploration of Java programming environment.
Prerequisites: MISY 2153.

MISY 4343 Cyber-Security for Electronic Commerce: 3 semester hours.

The course introduces the emerging area of electronic commerce and the security challenges and threats in the electronic commerce environment, and provides an understanding of the next generation state-of-the-art EC security technologies.
Prerequisites: MISY 3323.

MISY 4353 Information Technology Project Management: 3 semester hours.

Concepts, tools and techniques involved in Information Technology (IT) project management are presented. Focus will be on the five phases of project management: Initiating, Planning, Executing, Controlling, and Closing, and the nine project management knowledge areas: Integration Scope, Time, Cost, Quality, Human Resources, Quality, Risk.
Prerequisites: MGMT 3103 and MISY 3323.

MISY 4393 Information Systems Internship II: 3 semester hours.

Supervised full-time training in industry, government or other agencies for senior level information systems majors. Individual conferences, company performance evaluations and written reports required. The duration of the program will be one regular semester or two consecutive summer terms.

MISY 4413 E-Commerce: 3 semester hours.

The course provides technological as well as strategic and managerial aspects of electronic commerce systems. Topics covered include the use of hardware, software, architecture, payment mechanism, data security, and client and server side scripting in electronic commerce systems.
Prerequisites: MISY 3413.

MISY 4433 Adv Java Prog: 3 semester hours.

Covers advanced topics of Java programming and emphasizes the hands-on practice of Java applications. Students will be expected to explore Java programming environment intensively and develop adequate Java programming skills particularly in relation to graphical user interface, multimedia, and networking applications.
Prerequisites: MISY 3433.

MISY 4453 Special Topics in MIS: 3 semester hours.

The course provides a forum to bring in current issues in the MIS area such as information security, data mining, mobile/wireless technology and IT project management. Topics may vary from semester to semester and course can be repeated.
Prerequisites: MGMT 3103 and MISY 3323.

MISY 4523 Enterprise Strategic IT Management: 3 semester hours.

Strategic management concepts underlying the implementation of information Technology (IT) in an enterprise; pertinent IT issues such as analysis of strategic impact of IT, management of IT security and outsourcing; emphasis will be placed on hands-on learning using enterprise systems such as ERP. This course integrates issues covered in other MIS courses.
Prerequisites: MISY 3423 and MGMT 3103.

MISY 4993 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Reading, research, and/or field work on selected topics.

MISY 5103 Management Information Systems: 3 semester hours.

Foundational understanding of IS functions in relation to other business functions; current and emerging technologies; managerial and organizational understanding of IS functions within a networked or virtual organization; introduction to computer application software used by contemporary managers.

MISY 5323 Data Com & Network: 3 semester hours.

Integration of business management with data communications and networking core concepts such as fundamentals of data communication, various networking architectures and design, communication circuits and communication protocols.
Prerequisites: MISY 5103.

MISY 5413 App Database Management: 3 semester hours.

Concepts, tools, and technologies associated with the design, implementation and management of large databases for organizational effectiveness. Emphasis on the application aspect of databases.
Prerequisites: MISY 5103.

MISY 5423 Info Syst Analysis: 3 semester hours.

Focus on project planning, analysis, design, and implementation techniques, with an emphasis on the development of computer systems.
Prerequisites: MISY 5103.

MISY 5533 SP Topics in MISY: 3 semester hours.

The course provides a forum to bring in current issues in the MIS area such as project management, information security, data mining, etc. Topics may vary from semester to semester.
Prerequisites: MISY 5103.

Management for Executives Courses

EMGM 5103 Data Analysis for Managerial Decision Making: 3 semester hours.

The course provides and in-depth introduction to statistics as applied to managerial problems. The emphasis is on conceptual understanding as well as conducting statistical analyses. Course covers a quantitative approach to decision making. Statistical software will be used throughout the course.

EMGM 5113 Executive Leadership: 3 semester hours.

This course addresses topics such as leadership skills necessary at the executive level, building a personal leadership brand, managing personal reputation and image, the nature of strategic thinking, how decision-making changes at different leadership levels within an organization, personal and organizational barriers to execution and implementation, and understanding one's style of relating to and leading others.

EMGM 5303 Executive Topics in Strategy and Policy: 3 semester hours.

The course is intended to provide a broad exposure to strategic management theories and various concepts and developments in this area. It will develop skills necessary to analyze a problem situation, problem identification, strategy formulation, and strategy implementation and evaluation. The process will also focus on the leader's ability to manage the process of strategy formulation and implementation.

EMGM 5403 Operations and Supply Chain Management: 3 semester hours.

This course discusses the systematic design, direction, and control of processes that transform inputs into services and products for customers. The course will focus on how processes can be designed and managed to support the strategic objectives of an organization.

EMGM 5503 Business Ethics and Law: 3 semester hours.

Understand the underlying principles of ethics, related law, integrity, and objectivity for business executives, the audit committee, and external auditors. In addition, the student should be aware of the importance to observe the ethical rules of the professional and regulatory bodies.

EMGM 5903 Capstone Project: 3 semester hours.

This course will provide an opportunity to bring the learning from the EMBA program to bear on a final real world project. The project topic must be original and have bearing to a real world problem.

Management Courses

MGMT 1013 Introduction to Business: 3 semester hours.

An overview of business operations and the role of business in modem society. Topics of current interest to the business community will be introduced.

MGMT 1163 Quantitative Business Anaysis: 3 semester hours.

A practical, hands-on application of mathematical concepts for solving quantitative problems in Business. Mathematical concepts will be reinforced through application of these concepts to solve business related problems in a tutorial setting. Students will learn how to quantitatively model relate business decision variables and analyze these business models to seek appropriate solution.
Prerequisites: MATH 1113 and MATH 1153.

MGMT 2000 Prof Development for Business: 0 semester hours.

This course is mandatory for College of Business students and highlights the internship process and resources available. The course will orient students towards career-related strategic decision-making and help them better understand the role of internships towards future job success. Topics include: accessing and leverage digital resources for career development, resume writing and analysis, interviewing, on-the-job performance and the assessment process, and career planning.

MGMT 2013 Fund of Entrepreneurship: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed for non-business majors. It provides students with functional knowledge and skills in business that are required for a broad understanding of the field of entrepreneurship. Topics include identifying and managing critical resources, understanding financial and accounting issues, marketing and sales, and the legal environment of business.
Prerequisites: MGMT 1013.

MGMT 2203 Leadership and Ethics: 3 semester hours.

Course provides with frameworks to identify, critically analyze, and resove ethical issues faced in business environment; ensures understanding of how firms incorporate ethics into business strategies. Emphasis on case studies involving significant ethical dilemmas; also, the role of social and personal responsibility in a business setting will be explored.

MGMT 2391 Coop Ed I: 1 semester hour.

Cooperative program in approved private and public business organizations engaged in planning, organizing, activating, and controlling functions in producing and distributing goods and services. Written reports indicative of student's work experience are required.

MGMT 2393 Coop Educ I: 3 semester hours.

Cooperative program in approved private and public business organization engaged in planning, organizing, activating and controlling functions in producing and distributing goods and services. Written reports indicating students' work experience are required.
Prerequisites: MGMT 1013.

MGMT 3013 Business Statistics: 3 semester hours.

Statistical concepts, collection and presentation of data, measures of central tendency and dispersion, index numbers, probability concepts, probability distributions, sampling and linear regression.
Prerequisites: MATH 1153.

MGMT 3023 Quantitative Method: 3 semester hours.

Linear regression, comparisons of means, comparisons of proportions, tests of independence, analysis of variance, formulation of linear programs, decision theory. Use of MS Excel for these topics.
Prerequisites: MGMT 3013.

MGMT 3103 Principles of Management: 3 semester hours.

Fundamentals of organization and administration. Planning, organizing, directing, coordinating, and controlling business activities. Goal setting: models for thinking about organizations; organizational design; information systems; models for understanding individual behavior; job performance and job satisfaction; motivation and leadership; behavior in work groups and careers in business.
Prerequisites: MGMT 1013.

MGMT 3113 Introduction to Organizational Behavior: 3 semester hours.

Considers elements of several management theories and the implications of individual and group behavior for organizational effectiveness. Topics include perception; learning; personality; group dynamics; norms; inter-group relations; motivation; conflict and change.
Prerequisites: MGMT 3103.

MGMT 3333 Small Business Management: 3 semester hours.

This course provides students with an opportunity to apply business knowledge and skills through experiential learning. As the capstone course in the Certification in Entrepreneurship program, its emphasis is placed on starting, financing, operating, and growing a small business.
Prerequisites: FINA 3103 and MRKT 3103.

MGMT 3343 Project Management: 3 semester hours.

Application of management processes to complex interdisciplinary organizational environments through the study of program and project management. Uses typical project management microcomputer software for project planning; resource allocation; project budgeting; and control of project cost, schedule and performance.
Prerequisites: MGMT 3013 and MGMT 3103.

MGMT 3353 Human Resource Management: 3 semester hours.

Systematic approach to human resource utilization. Topics include selection, training, promotion, compensation, labor relations, workplace dysfunctions, management of change and, human resource accounting.
Prerequisites: MGMT 3103.

MGMT 3363 Industrial Relations: 3 semester hours.

A study of the philosophical, strategic, and behavioral aspects of labor-management relations as it relates to organizing, union contract negotiation and administration within the private and public sectors.
Prerequisites: MGMT 3103.

MGMT 3391 Coop Ed II: 1 semester hour.

Cooperative program in approved private and public business organizations engaged in planning, organizing, activating, and, controlling functions in producing and distributing goods and services. Written reports indicative of student's work experience are required.

MGMT 3393 Cooperative Education II: 3 semester hours.

Cooperative program in approved private and public business organizations engaged in planning, organizing, activating and controlling functions in producing and distributing goods and services. Written reports indicating student's work experience are required.
Prerequisites: MGMT 3103.

MGMT 4000 Professional Development For Business II: 0 semester hours.

The course will provide upper-level students with the skills necessary for successful transition to the post-graduation work environment. Through weekly interactive seminars, students will learn advanced interview techniques, salary negotiating, personal branding with social media, the role of professional certifications, leadership, and other strategies to enhance the development of their careers.
Prerequisites: MGMT 2000.

MGMT 4303 Strategic Management and Business Policy: 3 semester hours.

A capstone course to acquaint the student with strategic management and business policy. Focuses on management of the entire business. Uses the concepts, skills and tools of the entire business curriculum to develop in-depth situational appraisals and specific recommendations regarding strategies and their implementation and control.
Prerequisites: MGMT 3103 and MRKT 3103 and FINA 3103.

MGMT 4313 Business and Society: 3 semester hours.

A survey of the critical current issues in business and their relationship to government and the larger society. Ethical guidelines and principles are examined and the traditional and contemporary views of the business community toward its general environment are surveyed.
Prerequisites: MGMT 3103.

MGMT 4323 Supply Chain Management: 3 semester hours.

Provides students with the basic principles and key issues of supply chain management from a managerial perspective of gaining long term strategic and global competitiveness. Topics covered include managing supplier relationships, inventory management, process management, performance management and global issues in SCM.
Prerequisites: MGMT 3103 and MGMT 3013.

MGMT 4333 Production and Operations Management: 3 semester hours.

Major functions, departmental activities and policies for manufacturing firms and service organizations. Organization for production and analysis of production methods.
Prerequisites: MGMT 3013 and MGMT 3103.

MGMT 4383 Management Seminar: 3 semester hours.

Directed study of selected problems in the area of management which requires a multidisciplinary approach and analysis.

MGMT 4391 Coop Ed III: 1 semester hour.

Cooperative program in approved private and public business organizations engaged in planning, organizing, activating, and controlling functions in producing and distributing goods and services. Written reports indicative of student's work experience are required.

MGMT 4393 Cooperative Education III: 3 semester hours.

Cooperative program in approved private and public business organizations engaged in planning, organizing, activating and controlling functions in producing and distributing goods and services. Written reports indicative of student's work experience are required.

MGMT 4413 International Environment of Business: 3 semester hours.

Analyzes the cultural, political, legal, and geographical environments in which international businesses operate as well as various managerial activities appropriate for an international organization. Topics include multinational enterprises, global competition, managing political risks and negotiations, international laws, U.S. trade policies, strategies for US. firms, expatriation and repatriation and challenges for U.S. firms, etc.
Prerequisites: MRKT 3103 and MGMT 3103 and ECON 2113 and ECON 2123.

MGMT 4453 Special Topics in Management: 3 semester hours.

Explores and examines contemporary topics of interest in the field of Management. Course could be used to offer a variety of topics that deal with issues of importance in the discipline of management.

MGMT 4993 Independent Study: 1-3 semester hour.

Reading, research, and/or field work on selected topics.

MGMT 5003 Concepts of Management: 3 semester hours.

Examines major concepts, theories, and practices in management. Topics include theories of management, decision-making, organizational structure, human behavior in organizations, and control processes.

MGMT 5103 Organizational Behavior: 3 semester hours.

A study of social science concepts relevant to understanding and predicting human behavior in organizations. Topics include perception, learning, group processes, motivation and leadership, and organizational structure and change.
Prerequisites: MGMT 5003.

MGMT 5113 Business Statistics: 3 semester hours.

A study of statistical methodology useful for solving business problems. Topics addressed include probability, inferential statistics, regression analysis, and analysis of variance.

MGMT 5123 Quantitative Analysis: 3 semester hours.

A study of the principles and methods of applied mathematical modeling for managerial decision making. Topics addressed include linear and nonlinear optimization models, simulation, and project management.
Prerequisites: MGMT 5113.

MGMT 5323 Strategy and Policy: 3 semester hours.

Examines top management strategy, formulation, implementation, and evaluation. This course is the MBA capstone which synthesizes and integrates material from the various functions of business as it presents itself to organizational strategic managers.
Prerequisites: ACCT 5103 and ECON 5103 and FINA 5103 and MRKT 5303.

MGMT 5343 Human Resource Management: 3 semester hours.

An analysis of the methods and issues pertaining to the recruitment, selection, testing, promotion and remuneration of members of organizations. Covers job design and labor relations concepts.
Prerequisites: MGMT 5003.

MGMT 5353 Entrepreneurship and Innovation: 3 semester hours.

Provides an opportunity to experience the entrepreneurial process through team projects, presentations, and feedback. Topics include critical factors for starting a business, evaluating opportunities, entry strategies, creating a marketing plan, financial projections, forms of financing, external resources, legal and tax issues, recordkeeping and systems support.

MGMT 5393 Management Internship: 3 semester hours.

Supervised, full-time training in planning, organizing and controlling organizational functions at For Profit/Non-Profit organizations/government agencies for a regular semester or two consecutive summer semesters.

MGMT 5433 Production and Operations Management: 3 semester hours.

A study of systematic direction and control of the processes that transform inputs into products and services. Topics addressed include strategic decisions, capacity design, location and layout decisions, inventory management, material requirements planning, scheduling, and quality management.
Prerequisites: MGMT 5123.

MGMT 5613 Special Topics: 3 semester hours.

Explores and examines contemporary subjects and trends in business. Topics deal with issues of current importance.

MGMT 5993 Independent Study in Management: 3 semester hours.

Supervised readings, research, and/or field work on selected topics in management.

Managerial Comm for Executives Courses

EMCO 5203 Executive Managerial Communication: 3 semester hours.

Management communication as the downward, horizontal, and upward transfer of information and exchange of meaning, through formal and informal channels. Also, includes the art of negotiation and identifies rhetorical strategies and guidelines for analyzing and resolving stakeholder conflicts.

Marketing for Executives Courses

EMRK 5433 Marketing in a Global Environment: 3 semester hours.

Topics related to the marketing function and how it relates to value creation, strategic corporate management, and marketing decisions in a global environment. It includes organizational market orientation and dynamics, advertising and promotion, managing customer relationships, financial value, within the scope of both domestic and international markets.

Marketing Courses

MRKT 3103 Principles of Marketing: 3 semester hours.

A study of the importance of marketing in the American economy. An intensive examination of basic marketing variables (product, place, promotion and price) from the viewpoint of management.
Prerequisites: MGMT 1013.

MRKT 3113 Sports, Entertainment, and Event Marketing: 3 semester hours.

Course provides understanding of how marketing concepts can be applied and adapted to sports, entertainment and event marketing. Topics covered include the distinct nature of sports, entertainment and event products and services, sponsorships, endorsements, licensing, venue naming, planning, promoting and pricing.
Prerequisites: MRKT 3103.

MRKT 3313 Retail Management: 3 semester hours.

The nature and functions of retail outlets in the marketing structure are studied. Managerial policies and methods of providing goods and services to the ultimate consumer are also studied.
Prerequisites: MRKT 3103.

MRKT 3323 Salesmanship: 3 semester hours.

Concepts of effective selling including selection of sales staff and their training, management and evaluation, are studied. The basic steps in the selling process are stressed.
Prerequisites: MRKT 3103.

MRKT 3333 Consumer Behavior: 3 semester hours.

An analysis of the processes underlying the purchasing behavior of consumers and the major influences on consumer behavior, including culture, attitudes, and reference groups.
Prerequisites: MRKT 3103 and PSYC 1113.

MRKT 3393 Cooperative Education II: 3 semester hours.

Cooperative program in approved private/public business organizations engaged in planning, organizing, activating and controlling functions in marketing goods, services and ideas. Written reports indicating students work experience are required.
Prerequisites: MRKT 3103.

MRKT 4333 Advertising: 3 semester hours.

Fundamentals of the communication process in mass promotion (planning, creating the message, media selection, implementation, and measuring the results).
Prerequisites: MRKT 3103.

MRKT 4343 Marketing Research: 3 semester hours.

Application of the scientific method to the process of obtaining information for structuring marketing strategies and tactics. Emphasis is placed on the role of research in the solution of marketing problems.
Prerequisites: MRKT 3103 and MGMT 3013.

MRKT 4353 International Marketing: 3 semester hours.

International marketing opportunities and principles. Marketing tools as a means of adapting the individual domestic business line and its marketing methods to the international environment.
Prerequisites: MRKT 3103.

MRKT 4373 Sales Management: 3 semester hours.

A study of sales management through the use of analytical and problem-solving skills. Managerial responsibilities such as sales force production, sales planning, training of sales staff, sales compensation, establishing territories and controls are covered.
Prerequisites: MRKT 3103.

MRKT 4393 Marketing Communications: 3 semester hours.

An examination of the major elements of promotion including advertising, personal selling, publicity, sales promotion, and the development of an integrated marketing communications plan.
Prerequisites: MRKT 3103 and MRKT 3333.

MRKT 4413 Distribution Management: 3 semester hours.

An analysis of the policies, decisions and planning related to the distribution of goods and services for consumer and industrial sectors. Covers concepts related to physical distribution and marketing channels.
Prerequisites: MRKT 3103.

MRKT 4423 Fundamentals of E-Marketing: 3 semester hours.

Focuses on key marketing issues in E-commerce via the Internet. Explores concepts of customer relationship management, online communities, and web brand development.
Prerequisites: MRKT 3103 and MISY 2013.

MRKT 4453 Special Topics in Marketing: 3 semester hours.

Explores and examines contemporary topics of interest in the field of Marketing. Course could be used to offer a variety of topics that deal with issues of importance in the discipline of Marketing.

MRKT 4493 Marketing Strategy and Analysis: 3 semester hours.

Capstone course for marketing majors that should be taken in the last semester. Highly applications oriented. The course utilizes projects and problems designed to develop marketing strategies. Emphasizes the dynamics of three major foci: customer, competition, and capabilities of the organization.
Prerequisites: MRKT 3103 and MRKT 3333.

MRKT 4593 Cooperative Education III: 3 semester hours.

Cooperative program in approved private/public business organizations engaged in planning, organizing, activating and controlling functions in marketing goods, services and ideas. Written reports indicating students' work experience are required.
Prerequisites: MRKT 3103.

MRKT 4993 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research and/or field work on selected topics.

MRKT 5003 Concepts of Marketing: 3 semester hours.

Surveys the different aspects of the marketing function, including the use of marketing research to understand consumer and industrial markets and the development of the marketing strategy elements of product, distribution, price, and promotion.

MRKT 5303 Marketing Management: 3 semester hours.

Application course dealing primarily with strategic marketing planning; specifically, the formulation of marketing strategies, evaluation of alternatives, and implementation of a marketing program. Examines selection of target markets, analysis of market data, and the development of a marketing mix to meet target market needs.
Prerequisites: MRKT 5003.

MRKT 5313 International Marketing: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of the economic, political, social, and cultural environments of international business and the development of product, price, channels of distribution, and promotion strategies for international markets.
Prerequisites: MRKT 5003.

Mngmnt Info Sys for Executives Courses

EMIS 5513 Information Technology and Organizational Value Creation: 3 semester hours.

Role of Information technology in value creation in organizations. Covers topics such as business value of organizational technologies (such as ERP, CRM, etc.). IT-based resources, capabilities, and competitive advantage.