School of Architecture

http://www.pvamu.edu/soa/

Mission

The School of Architecture combines teaching, research and service to proactively develop the discipline of creative and innovative problem solving to address the needs of our society.

Vision

Graduates of the School of Architecture will participate in the contemporary milieu, encourage, anticipate, and respond to changes in the local, national and international communities.

The School of Architecture with programs in Architecture, Construction Science and Community Development and Art are dedicated to accomplishing their mission through graduates for excellence in teaching, research and service by preparing graduates for leadership roles in rebuilding America’s cities and improving the quality of the built environment. By offering a diverse curriculum led by an accomplished faculty in a comprehensive studio and classroom environment, the School of Architecture programs will educate students for significant roles as practitioners, developers and leaders in architecture, construction, community planning and community development. Students in the programs of the School will be challenged to develop their abilities in problem solving, creative thinking and informed decision making as a focus of their professional education. They will accomplish this in a nurturing and student centered environment that fosters personal development and professional excellence.

The location of the School of Architecture near the City of Houston offers an opportunity for students to enrich their learning experience through access to the greater architectural and construction community of the region and the many employment opportunities in the field.

Instructional Organization

Program Degree Offered
ArchitectureBS & MARCH
Community DevelopmentMCD
Construction ScienceBS
Digital Media ArtsBS

Accreditation

The Master of Architecture degree is accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB). “The NAAB provides the following mandatory accreditation statement.”

“In the United States, most registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes three types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture, the Master of Architecture, and the Doctor of Architecture. A program may be granted a 6-year, 3-year, or 2-year term of accreditation, depending on the extent of its degree of conformance with established educational standards.

The Doctor of Architecture and Master of Architecture Degree programs may consist of a preprofessional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree that, when earned sequentially, constitute an accredited professional education. However, the preprofessional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.”

Prairie View A&M University, School of Architecture offers the following NAAB accredited degree program:

Master of Architecture (pre-professional degree with a minimum of 132 credit hours that includes eight design studios + 36 graduate credit hours).

Next accreditation visit: 2018

Centers

Within the School of Architecture, the Texas Institute for the Preservation of History and Culture and the Community Urban and Rural Enhancement Service Center serve as the research and service arms in the Community. Both centers serve to educate and involve the students and faculty in the School and the University with projects and activities related to the historic fabric and urban settings of the community.

The Texas Institute for the Preservation of History and Culture (TIPHC)

Serving as a research and service center for the University and the School of Architecture. The Institute integrates multiple disciplines and a wide range of knowledge, e.g., oral history, historic preservation; and comprehensive documentation reflecting the historical influence of large scale and on small scale communities in Texas. The institute also views indigenous culture, architecture and community development as potentially symbiotic; it moves beyond the tripartite disciplines to a search for ways to educate the students and the community and to actively regenerate human understanding.

Community Urban and Rural Enhancement Service Center (CURES)

The center’s focus is on the survey to work with inner city neighborhoods and documentation, rural communities across the State of Texas to identify their needs pertaining to the built environment as it pertains and to the legacies of culturally specific help them shape their communities. Through collaboration within the School of Architecture programs, the center is able to prepare to help deliver a comprehensive holistic approach to problem solving that assist neighborhoods, local governing bodies, community-based organizations, and citizens with their vision. CURES, develop visions and plans for many types of places and open spaces using green building concepts. Faculty and students involved in the center apply their education and training in architecture, construction and development to promote innovation planning and re-adaptive use of exciting and historic structures. The center is also involved in many of the university’s wide service learning activities that involve students of all disciplines with the enhancement of communities in our state and across our country.

Admission Requirements

Admission is open to all qualified individuals in accordance with the policies of Prairie View A&M University. Application instructions and information for incoming students is completed through the State of Texas Common Application for Freshman Admission available at www.pvamu.edu.

For qualified entering freshmen and transfer students, the School of Architecture offers the Architectural Concepts Institute (ACI), a special summer program described in the catalog section, “Summer and International Enrichment Programs.”

Transfer Students

Transfer students from accredited architecture programs or with non-architectural education backgrounds should contact the School of Architecture for information regarding appropriate placement within the curriculum.

Transfer Courses

Students wishing to transfer architecture and/or construction science courses taken at another institution must provide sufficient evidence of equivalency. No course with a grade less than a “C” will be accepted.

Admission to the Programs

During the spring semester of the third year of study, students wishing to pursue the professional degree in architecture will make formal application to continue in the professional program. Admission will be determined by grade point average (overall and in architecture), a review of the student portfolio of work and faculty recommendations. Students admitted to the professional program will complete the Program A: Professional Track, during their senior year and complete a formal application with the Office of Graduate Studies prior to completing their final semester of undergraduate studies.

Computer Requirement. Students in the program are required to have their own computer for use in the classroom or studio no later than the start of their sophomore year. Computer equipment and software must meet with prescribed hardware and software standards. Computer equipment and software requirements are posted on the school’s website.

Grades. A grade of a “C” or better is required for all Architecture and Construction Science courses. In the program, a “C” is equivalent to a grade of 70-79. Students may repeat architecture and construction science courses only one time for grade replacement purposes.

Student Projects, Papers or Reports. The School of Architecture reserves the right to retain, exhibit, and reproduce all work submitted by students. Work submitted for a grade is the property of the school and remains so until it is returned to the student.

Counseling and Advising. Program Directors, staff and senior faculty members assist students in career counseling and guidance. Advisement for course registration is provided by the academic staff and the responsible academic program director.

Ineligible Registration. The School of Architecture reserves the right to prevent any student who is not eligible for registration from entering a course for reasons such as: unapproved overloads, unapproved repeated courses, lower division-upper division rule infractions, and lack of prerequisites. Any student found to be ineligible for a course, may be dropped from that course at the time of discovery.

Catalog Selection. Students will use the catalog issued for the year in which they were first officially admitted to the School of Architecture or may elect to use a more recent catalog. However, if they later transfer to another institution or another college at PVAMU and wish to return to the School of Architecture at Prairie View A&M University they will follow the current catalog curricula in effect if they are readmitted.

Course Load. Approval from the Program Director and the Dean is required for a course load of more than 18 semester hours (12 hours for a summer term). Correspondence courses are included in the student’s course load, as are courses taken concurrently at other institutions. Students that are employed and working more than 20 hours a week should limit their semester hour enrollment and course selection should be determined with assistance of the academic staff.

Class Attendance. Prairie View A&M University requires regular class attendance. Students in the School of Architecture are expected to attend all scheduled class meeting times and activities. Absences in excess of those stipulated in each individual course syllabus may result in a student’s course grade being reduced. Students should refer to the university’s policy, procedures, and dates on dropping a course. Students are encouraged to meet with their academic advisor for additional information.

Application for Degree. Candidates for the must file for graduation with the School of Architecture and the university in accordance with deadlines established by the university. Typically, cut-off dates to submit an application occur in the final semester prior to the start of the final semester before their anticipated date of graduation. Undergraduate students must have a grade of “C” or better in all Architecture and Construction Science courses and a 2.5 GPA to graduate.

Practicum and Internship Programs. The School of Architecture requires a graduate level internship with an architecture firm for the Masters of Architecture degree. Students may also enroll in an internship at the undergraduate level as an elective course. Students in Construction Science are required to complete two (2) internships. In order to obtain academic credit for the internship, all internships must be approved by the respective academic program director. Architecture students are encouraged to participate in the professional practicum program which offers the opportunity to receive academic credit for such activities as: “study abroad,” completing a semester at another accredited architecture program, or studying in the offices of several leading architectural firms.

Minor. Minors are offered in Architecture, Construction Science and Art. The students should consult with an  advisor and have a Minor Approval Form completed, approved and signed. A list of recommended courses is available from the advisor. All minors require 18 hours as listed in this catalog. A listing of courses for both minors is provided in this catalog. At least 9 of the 18 hours must be taken in residence for the Art minor. For the Construction Science minor, only three hours may be taken off campus with the approval of the program director. Grades of a “C” or better are required in each course for both minors.

Academic Standards and Academic Progress

To earn credit for a course in architecture and to qualify for the next course in a sequence, a student must have earned a “C” or better. To repeat a course in architecture more than once, students must have permission of the Dean.

Bachelor of Science in Architecture

The Bachelor of Science degree in Architecture, (pre-professional program) provides the common ground for studies in architecture. It is intended to cover the basic content for the preparation of an educated practitioner and to lead to professional studies at the graduate level.

The Bachelor of Science in Architecture degree has two concentrations; Program A, the professional concentration, leads directly to enrollment in the Master of Architecture professional degree. Program B, the non-professional concentration, provides a basic education in architecture with the opportunity to study a broad range of elective opportunities. Both tracks consist of 132 credit hours of undergraduate courses.

Degree Program Requirements

Core Requirements
All Architecture Core Curriculum requirements are shown in the suggested degree program. Core:
ENGL 1123Freshman Composition I3
ENGL 1143Technical Writing3
MATH 1123Trigonometry3
PHSC 1123
PHSC 2123
Physical Science I
and Physical Science II
6
ARCH 2233History of Architecture I3
ARCH 1253Architecture Design3
HIST 1313
HIST 1323
U.S. to 1876
and U.S. 1876 to Present
6
POSC 1113
POSC 1123
American Government
and Texas Government
6
ECON 2003Fundamentals of Economics3
FINA 2103Personal Financial Management and Planning3
ARCH 1273Multimedia Digital Applications3
Major Requirements
ARCH 1233Visual Communications3
ARCH 1266Architecture Design II6
ARCH 2223Computer Aided Design3
ARCH 2243History of Architecture II3
ARCH 2256Architecture Design III6
ARCH 2266Architecture Design IV6
ARCH 2273Materials and Methods I3
ARCH 3256Architecture Design V6
ARCH 3266Architecture Design VI6
ARCH 3283Materials and Methods II3
ARCH 3293Structural Systems I3
ARCH 3453Environmental Systems3
ARCH 3463Sustainable Building3
ARCH 4433Structural Systems II3
ARCH 4443CAD Construction Documents and Codes3
Concentration (Select one from below)30
Professional Track Concentration take the following courses:
Architecture Design VII
Architecture Design VIII
Architecture Electives (Take 6 hours of ARCH Electives)
Non-Architecture Electives (Take 12 hours of electives in any area)
Non-Professional Track Concentration
Electives (Take 30 hours of electives)
Total Hours132

Bachelor of Science in Construction Science Program

The Bachelor of Science in Construction Science comprises of a total of 121 credit hours. The curriculum is structured to prepare graduates for professional management and technical positions within the construction industry. Graduates also have the option of obtaining a graduate degree in construction management or business.

The mission of the Construction Science program is to empower students to assume the broad range of professional positions in the construction industry. Graduates will be prepared for employment in planning, estimating, scheduling, coordinating, supervising and managing construction projects. The curriculum structure is designed to provide a well-rounded preparation for entry into the construction business. It is structured to provide students with knowledge of materials, methods, estimating, scheduling, operations, logistics, supervision, management and law. Additional courses required in business, architecture and general education will result in a well-rounded preparation for entry into the field.

Construction Science Degree Program Requirements

Core Curriculum
ENGL 1123
ENGL 1143
Freshman Composition I
and Technical Writing
6
MATH 2003Elementary Statistics3
PHSC 1123Physical Science I3
PHSC 2123Physical Science II3
ARCH 2243History of Architecture II3
ARCH 1253Architecture Design3
HIST 1313
HIST 1323
U.S. to 1876
and U.S. 1876 to Present
6
POSC 1113
POSC 1123
American Government
and Texas Government
6
University Approved Social and Behavioral Science course3
ECON 2003Fundamentals of Economics3
ARCH 1273Multimedia Digital Applications3
Major Requirements
CONS 3533Managing Construction Operations3
CONS 3633Surveying and Soils3
CONS 4403Construction Internship 13
CONS 4403Construction Internship3
CONS 4603Construction Labor and Safety3
CONS 4633Construction Law and Ethics3
CONS 4753Scheduling and Mobilization3
CONS 4773Construction Project Controls3
ARCH 4733Advanced Computer Aided Design3
or ARCH 4753 Introduction to Geographical Information Systems
Select one of the following: (Students should enroll in one of the following courses that best fits their career goals.)3
Residential Construction
Commercial Construction 2
Industrial Construction
Highway/Heavy Construction
Facilities Management
Architecture Requirements:
ARCH 1233Visual Communications3
ARCH 2223Computer Aided Design3
ARCH 2273Materials and Methods I3
ARCH 3013Construction Estimating3
ARCH 3283Materials and Methods II3
ARCH 3293Structural Systems I3
ARCH 3453Environmental Systems3
ARCH 3463Sustainable Building3
ARCH 4433Structural Systems II3
ARCH 4443CAD Construction Documents and Codes3
ARCH 4743Building Information Modeling3
Other Requirments:
ACCT 2113Financial Accounting3
BLAW 2203Legal Environment of Business3
MATH 1124Calculus with Analytic Geometry I4
MGMT 3103Principles of Management3
MRKT 3103Principles of Marketing3
Total Hours121
1

CONS 4403 Program requires two summer internships at 3 hours each.

2

Career Options: Depending upon their career objectives and with approval by the program Director, students may substitute one of the following courses for CONS 4423 Commercial Construction.

Construction Science as a Double Major and a Minor

Due to the increased use of the Design-Build Method for project delivery, the School of Architecture offers students majoring in architecture the opportunity to obtain a second baccalaureate degree or a minor in the field of construction science. The hours required for the second baccalaureate degree are an addition to those counted for the first degree and must be completed in accordance with university and School of Architecture requirements.

Requirements for Construction Science as a Second Baccalaureate Degree

A double major in Construction Science can be obtained by architecture majors with completion of the following 30 credit hours.

MATH 2003Elementary Statistics3
CONS 3533Managing Construction Operations3
CONS 3633Surveying and Soils3
CONS 4403Construction Internship3
CONS 4423Commercial Construction 13
CONS 4603Construction Labor and Safety3
CONS 4633Construction Law and Ethics3
CONS 4753Scheduling and Mobilization3
CONS 4773Construction Project Controls3
ARCH 3013Construction Estimating3
Total Hours30
1

Depending on their career interests and with approval of the program Director, the student may substitute CONS 4413, CONS 4433, CONS 4443 or CONS 4453 for CONS 4423.

2

 Students may also use ARCH 4743 Building Information Modeling (B.I.M.) or ARCH 4973 (G.I.S.) in place of MATH 2003, CONS 4753 and/or CONS 4773.

Construction Science Minor Requirements

A minor in Construction Science can be obtained by completing 18 credit hours. Recommended courses are:

CONS 3633Surveying and Soils3
CONS 4603Construction Labor and Safety3
CONS 4633Construction Law and Ethics3
CONS 4753Scheduling and Mobilization3
ARCH 3013Construction Estimating3
Select one of the following: 3
Residential Construction
Commercial Construction
Industrial Construction
Highway/Heavy Construction
Facilities Management
Total Hours18

 

Digital Media Arts Program

The Digital Media Arts program is dedicated to educating and training designers of the future. Students will be prepared to meet the high demand of the design industry using their skills in graphic design and interactive media. In addition, students will be introduced to critical design theory and analysis in preparation for graduate study.

Application instructions and information for incoming students is completed through the State of Texas Common Application for Freshman Admission available at www.pvamu.edu. Admission is open to all qualified individuals in accordance with the policies of  Texas A&M and Prairie View A&M University.

Degree and Courses
The Digital Media Arts degree mirrors the American Institute of Graphic Arts professional standards. The degree emphasizes:

1. Increasing the ability to create and develop visual responses to communication problems;
2. Increasing the ability to solve communication problems using the design process and beta testing implementation; and           3. Increasing the understanding of and ability to utilize tools and technology. The lower division coursework, Creative Thinking, Sign + Symbols, Fundamentals of Digital Imaging and Fundamentals of Interactive Media, introduce content associated  with developing problem-solving strategies and honing technical proficiency. The upper division coursework focuses on advanced training in technology, branding, print graphic design, motion graphics, various forms of interactive media and project development

Question:
How will a degree in Digital Media Arts help me to be a successful designer?
Answer:
Becoming a successful designer is more than just mastering software. Designers must study the history, theory, and traditions of the industry. Design requires excellent communication and basic math skills in addition to creativity.
For every aspect of your design, you should be able to explain why. With a degree in Digital Media Arts, you will master all the “other” tools that will make you a well-rounded designer.

Career Opportunities:

Professional designers can work in a range of different design careers and projects including: digital design, multimedia design, type design, motion graphics (film title and/or tv graphics), exhibit design, signage design, environmental design, package design, publications systems, educational design, magazine illustration, identity design (branding), information design and design entrepreneur.

Degree Program Requirements

Core Curriculum
Communication (Choose two)6
Freshman Composition I
Freshman Composition II (or)
Technical Writing
Mathematics (choose one)3
Contemporary College Algebra
College Algebra
College Algebra and Trigonometry
Trigonometry
Life and Physical Sciences (choose two)6
College Biology I
General Inorganic Chemistry
Introduction to General Chemistry
Physical Science I
Language, Philosophy and Culture3
History of Art I
Creative Arts3
African American Art
American History (choose two)6
U.S. to 1876
U.S. 1876 to Present
History of Texas
Government/Political Science (Choose two)6
American Government
Texas Government
Social & Behavioral Sciences (choose one)3
Cultural Geography
Global Issues
General Psychology
Developmental Psyc
Personality
General Sociology
Sociology of Minorities
Social Problems
Professional Development: Area One (choose one)3
Computer Science I
Computer Applications in Engineering Technology I
Computer Applications in Engineering
Personal Financial Management and Planning
Professional Development: Area Two (Choose one)3
Multimedia Digital Applications
Fundamentals of Speech Communication
Interpersonal Communication
Digital Communication
Info & Communication in the Digital Age
Major Requirements - 60 SCHs
ARTS 1113Design I3
ARTS 1123Design II3
ARTS 1153Drawing I3
ARTS 1173Creative Thinking3
ARTS 2233History of Art II3
ARTS 2313Graphic Design Hist3
ARTS 2353Color Theory3
ARTS 2363Sign + Symbol3
DGMA 3123Layout I3
DGMA 3133Layout II3
DGMA 3323Typography I3
DGMA 3333Typography II3
DGMA 3343Branding3
DGMA 3353Interactive Media3
DGMA 4143Problems in Media Arts I3
DGMA 4153Problems in Media Arts II3
DGMA 4163Advanced Interactive Media3
DGMA 4173Social Media Design3
DGMA 4183Motion Graphics3
DGMA 4193Senior Studio Thesis3
Prescribed Electives - 12 SCHs
ARTS 3193Printmaking3
ARTS 4103Creative Photography I3
DGMA 2173Fundamentals of Digital Imaging3
DGMA 2183Fundamentals of Interactive Media3
Free Arts Electives - 6 SCHs (Choose two)6
Ceramics
Painting
Oil Painting I
Sculpture I
Watercolor
Crafts Design
Printmaking II
Book Arts
Special Topics in Digital Media Arts
Total Hours120
ART MINOR
ARTS 1113Design I3
ARTS 1153Drawing I3
ARTS 1203Introduction to Visual Arts3
ARTS 2193Painting3
Choose (2) two 3 hr courses from the courses listed below:6
Oil Painting I
Sculpture I
Watercolor
Printmaking
Crafts Design
Creative Photography I
Total Hours18
DIGITAL MEDIA ARTS MINOR
ARTS 1113Design I3
DGMA 2173Fundamentals of Digital Imaging3
DGMA 2183Fundamentals of Interactive Media3
ARTS 2313Graphic Design Hist3
Choose (2) two 3-hr courses from the courses listed below:6
Design II
Creative Thinking
Sign + Symbol
Printmaking
Crafts Design
Creative Photography I
Total Hours18

Master of Architecture with a major in Architecture

The Master of Architecture is a professional degree program that prepares students for roles in the profession of architecture by building on the content of the pre-professional degree through intensive and focused advanced studies in architecture design and practice. A major objective of this program is preparing graduates of the professional program to obtain their professional architecture registration. The degree program consists of an undergraduate curriculum of 132 credit hours plus a graduate curriculum of 36 credit hours and is the accredited program at Prairie View A&M University.

Admission Requirements

All students admitted to the Master of Architecture program must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate School of Prairie View A&M University. In addition, for students matriculating from a four-year, pre-professional program (for example, Program B of the Prairie View A&M University Bachelor of Science in Architecture degree) or entering the program with a bachelor’s degree in some field other than architecture, the School of Architecture will require submission of a design portfolio for review.

Accreditation

The Master of Architecture degree is accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB). “The NAAB provides the following mandatory accreditation statement.”

“In the United States, most registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes three types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture, the Master of Architecture, and the Doctor of Architecture. A program may be granted a 6-year, 3-year, or 2-year term of accreditation, depending on the extent of its degree of conformance with established educational standards.

The Doctor of Architecture and Master of Architecture Degree programs may consist of a preprofessional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree that, when earned sequentially, constitute an accredited professional education. However, the preprofessional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.”

Prairie View A&M University, School of Architecture offers the following NAAB-accredited degree program:

Master of Architecture (pre-professional degree with a minimum of 132 credit hours that includes eight design studios + 36 graduate credit hours).

Next accreditation visit: 2018

Professional Degree Program Requirements

The degree requires a minimum of 36 semester credit hours. The core of the program consists of 30 credit hours of courses required of all students. The remaining six credit hours of electives may be selected from courses in architecture, community development or other graduate degree programs on campus.

Required graduate-level courses consist of 36 SCH.

ARCH 5506Internship6
ARCH 5566Architecture Design IX6
ARCH 5513Research Seminar3
ARCH 5579Comprehensive Project Studio9
ARCH 5483Structural Systems III3
ARCH 5593Professional Practice3
Electives6
Total Degree Requirements36

 

Students entering the graduate program with a prior non-professional degree such as (B.S. in Architecture, Bachelor of Environmental Design, Bachelor of Science in Environmental Design or similar degrees) will complete the above requirements as a minimum and, upon review of coursework and portfolio of design work, may be required to take additional undergraduate courses missing from their prior studies.

 Students with a prior degree in a major other than architecture or environmental design will have to complete the above degree requirements and approximately 60 semester credit hours of undergraduate and graduate equivalent courses. Included in these hours is a minimum of four design studios which must be passed with a B or better. With careful scheduling, this program may be completed in 3 and ½ academic years.

Master of Community Development with a major in Community Development

The Master of Community Development is designed to meet the needs of individuals with diverse academic backgrounds who care about the problems and potential of socially, physically and economically distressed communities. Students will also be involved with the design and development of new and growing communities with the anticipation of avoiding future problems being faced by communities today. The degree consists of a minimum of 36 credit hours, of which 24 are required courses and 12 elective courses. The curriculum is designed to broaden the knowledge base, promote research, service learning and decision making along with developing interactive and collaborative skills applicable to teamwork, management, leadership and entrepreneurship.

Admission Requirements

Regular application requirements of the University apply to all applicants for the Community Development Master’s degree. In addition, the candidates must schedule a meeting with the program director to develop a study plan which will lay out course selections and identify the need, if any, for additional credit hours beyond the required 36. During the application submission process students must include their Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores.

Degree Program Requirements

The degree requires a minimum of 36 semester credit hours. The core of the program consists of 24 credit hours of courses required of all students. A list of pre-approved courses is provided, from which the student may select the remaining twelve credit hours. Alternative courses may be selected from offerings of other degree programs on campus, with departmental approval.

Required graduate-level courses consist of 36 SCH.

Required Courses
CODE 5013Introduction to Community Development3
CODE 5033Community Dev Studio3
CODE 5043Community Dev Practicum I 13
CODE 5063Commun Dev Prac II 13
CODE 5343Community Research3
CODE 5323Community Analysis3
CODE 5073Comm Dev Financing3
CODE 5083Demograhpy & GIS3
Electives12
Select four classes from the following:
Coll Community Project Studio
Cultural Heritage Preservation 2
Presv Law & Econ
Introduction to Community Leadership 2
Negotiation, Mediation and Facilitation
Community Political Structure
Community Management and Leadership
Capital Development 2
Grant Development
Campaigns And Gifts
Research for Capital and Grant Development
Land Development and Planning in Declining Communities 2
Land Development and Use Control Strategies
Global Community Development in the United States
International Community Development Policies and Practices
Principles of Real Estate I
Principles of Real Estate II
Law of Agency
Law of Contract
Total Hours36
1

 CODE 5406 Internship can be used as a required course to replace CODE 5043 and 5063 with departmental approval.

2

 For a broad based understanding of the field of community development, the following are recommended. However, students can select from any of the electives listed.

School of Architecture Community Development Graduate Certification Program

The School of Architecture under its graduate program in Community Development offers certifications in the following study areas:

  • Real Estate Development
  • Historic Preservation
  • Fundraising
  • Community Planning
  • International Community Development

The purpose for offering graduate certificates is to meet the additional education needs of the community development professional. As jobs responsibilities change due to emerging new markets and demands, additional training or specialized training are often required for many of the other professions. For example, an architect may become involved in the preservation of historic districts or the planning and development of a community; a non-profit executive being involved in fundraising activities; a developer being involved in the development of another country’s infrastructure, etc. Students in the Community Development Master’s Program or any other master’s program have the option to select courses from these study areas to fulfill their elective course requirement. The Community Development Graduate Certification Program is a set of courses that provides in-depth knowledge in a subject matter. The set of courses are more practice-oriented than the required courses in a graduate academic program.

Certificates in Historic Preservation, Fundraising, International Community Development, Real Estate Development, and Community Planning are awarded after the completion of the program, and must be signed by the program director and/or the Dean of the School of Architecture.

The certificate course work consists of 12 semester hours as follows:

Certification in Historic Preservation

CODE 5103Cultural Heritage Preservation3
CODE 5123Historic Preservation3
CODE 5113Historic Preservation Material Conservation3
CODE 5143Presv Law & Econ3
Total12

Certification in Fundraising

CODE 5513Grant Development3
CODE 5523Campaigns And Gifts3
CODE 5543Research for Capital and Grant Development3
CODE 5503Capital Development3
Total12

Certification in Community Planning

CODE 5203Introduction to Community Leadership3
CODE 5363Community Physical Structure3
CODE 5603Land Development and Planning in Declining Communities3
CODE 5753International Community Development Policies and Practices3
Total12

Certification In International Community Development

CODE 5203Introduction to Community Leadership3
CODE 5303Community Political Structure3
CODE 5743Global Community Development in the United States3
CODE 5613Land Development and Use Control Strategies3
Total12

Certification in Real Estate Development

CODE 5803Principles of Real Estate I3
CODE 5823Law of Agency3
CODE 5833Law of Contract3
CODE 5813Principles of Real Estate II3
Total12

Certification Procedure

Step 1: Application for the Certificate Program

Apply to the Graduate School for Admission. After being admitted by the Graduate School, the student will complete an Application for one of the five Certification Programs and submit it for review by the Director of the Community Development Program.

Step 2: Review of the Application

The Director will review the application for compliance with the requirements for content. The student would the meet with the Director to develop a study plan to lay out the certification course selections. The Director will review the study plan for compliance with the established requirements for certification.

Step 3: Issue of the Certificate

Upon completion of the certification requirements, the student must notify the Director of their status by applying for certification. The student is required to pay a certification fee of $15 to cover the cost to administer the certification. The Director after their review of the student’s study plan and progress will advise the dean of the college. The director/dean will then authorize the granting of the certificate.

Honor Societies, Clubs, and Service Organizations

Student organizations play an important role in the socialization of students and in helping students develop skills in leadership and service. All students are encouraged to become active members in any of the following appropriate organizations sponsored by the School of Architecture.

  • American Institute of Architecture Students (AIAS)
  • Construction Specifications Institute (CSI)
  • National Organization of Minority Architecture Students (NOMAS)
  • Women in Architecture
  • The Tau Sigma Delta Honor Architecture Arts of Design National Honor Society
  • Alpha Rho Chi
  • Association of General Contractors
  • National Association of Homebuilders (NAHB)

The Student Support Services (SSS), mission for: PVAMU-School of Architecture

 

Student Support Services, program also known as "student services," includes prevention, intervention, transition and follow-up services for students. The Student Support Services program is designed to assist participants with enhancing their academic skills, increase the retention and graduation rates, and promote acceptance into respective graduate and professional school programs.  

Student Support Services professionals provide direct services for all students.  A major focus is for those students who are experiencing problems that create barriers to learning and of eligible low income; those who are first generation and/or disabled students, and, to foster an institutional climate supportive of the success for those students through comprehensive services and advocacy.  Direct services are provided by means such as education, counseling, consultation and individual assessment.  In addition, Student Support Services personnel provide in-service training, community collaboration and carry out student service program management. Student Support Services are a vital part of comprehensive school program success.

Student Support Services is also the leaders for the School in supervision of student organizations/professional chapters, career choices and off-campus educational opportunities such as educational travel and studies.

For additional information, refer to the Undergraduate Catalog, Student Services.

Architecture Courses

ARCH 1233 Visual Communications: 3 semester hours.

Multimedia techniques in graphics emphasizing orthographic projections, perspective, shade and shadow, and freehand drawing.
Co-requisite: ARCH 1253.

ARCH 1253 Architecture Design: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to basic design issues including forum, space, ordering systems, human use and the architect's responsibility to society. Students will investigate these issues critically in individual and collaborative projects and communicate findings through visual, oral and written presentations.
Co-requisite: ARCH 1233.

ARCH 1266 Architecture Design II: 6 semester hours.

Basic principles of architectural design and communication including organization, spatial sequence, relationships and problem solving using simple interior and exterior problems.
Prerequisites: ARCH 1253.

ARCH 1273 Multimedia Digital Applications: 3 semester hours.

The goal of this course is to obtain an introductory skill set for using computer base mutimedia technologies, such as Adobe Acrobat, PhotoShop, Illustrator, and AutoCad, which will further help assist them in their studies and practices. The primary emphasis is to help improve their research, productivity, presentation & communications through the effective use of graphic technology; stimulating their personal capacity & creativity.

ARCH 2223 Computer Aided Design: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the range and potential of computer aided design and electronic media in problem solving and conceptual design.

ARCH 2233 History of Architecture I: 3 semester hours.

Survey of the development of architecture from Renaissance to modern era. This course will also focus on culturally significant Western and Nonwestern architecture that advances critical thought and intellectual curiosity. Required drawing and reading material will enhance the evolution of historical, social and political concepts and foster the ability to write and express ideas graphically and professionally to engage effectively the regional, national and global community with an emphasis on personal as well as social responsibility.

ARCH 2243 History of Architecture II: 3 semester hours.

Survey of the development of architecture from Renaissance to modern era. This course will also focus on culturally significant Western and Nonwestern architecture that advances critical thought and intellectual curiosity. Required drawing and reading material will enhance the evolution of historical, social and political concepts and foster the ability to write and express ideas graphically and professionally to engage effectively the regional, national and global community with an emphasis on personal as well as social responsibility.

ARCH 2256 Architecture Design III: 6 semester hours.

Problem solving and presentation of basic principles, concepts and ideas as applied to simple architectural problems.
Prerequisites: ARCH 1266.

ARCH 2266 Architecture Design IV: 6 semester hours.

Basic architectural design projects with an emphasis on site development, function, form and the design process.
Prerequisites: ARCH 2256.

ARCH 2273 Materials and Methods I: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the properties and uses of natural and manufactured building materials and the effect of the nature of materials upon design.

ARCH 2313 Digital Drawing: 3 semester hours.

Drawing using both digital and conventional drawing techniques.

ARCH 2323 Digital Illustration: 3 semester hours.

Visual communication strategies, color theory and advanced drawing.

ARCH 3013 Construction Estimating: 3 semester hours.

Classification of work and quantity survey techniques. Basic estimating applied to simple construction projects. Creation of bills of materials and quantity take-offs.

ARCH 3256 Architecture Design V: 6 semester hours.

Building design as it relates to structure, circulation, context and support systems.
Prerequisites: ARCH 2266 and ARCH 3293 (may be taken concurrently).

ARCH 3266 Architecture Design VI: 6 semester hours.

Analysis and design of structures of advanced complexity with emphasis on interrelationships of building systems.
Prerequisites: ARCH 3256.

ARCH 3283 Materials and Methods II: 3 semester hours.

Emphasis on systems of building structures and on the interrelationships among the components of the systems, the assembly processes and project control.

ARCH 3293 Structural Systems I: 3 semester hours.

A study of theory of various structural concepts. Emphasis placed on statics and strength of materials.
Prerequisites: MATH 1123.

ARCH 3453 Environmental Systems: 3 semester hours.

Fundamentals of environmental systems for buildings: lighting, electrical, heating, ventilating, air conditioning, plumbing, and life safety.

ARCH 3463 Sustainable Building: 3 semester hours.

Issues facing the design and construction industries in creating and maintaining high performance green buildings. Sustainable building projects will be analyzed, green building rating systems of USGBC's LEED system and the DOE's Energy Star program will be studied and researched and presentation of benchmark sustainable case study projects will be accomplished.

ARCH 3563 Site and Urban Design: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to urban planning and the analysis of site characteristics, adaptation of building to site, determination of the interrelationship of intended site use with the environment, and the consideration of climate.

ARCH 3643 Presentation Techniques: 3 semester hours.

Basic graphic communications emphasizing good drafting skills in; perspective drawings, rendering techniques and model building. Prerequisite: junior standing.

ARCH 4063 Project Planning and Feasibility: 3 semester hours.

Principles and practice of residential and commercial land development.

ARCH 4406 Architectural Internship: 6 semester hours.

Approved internship in an architecture office, the building construction industry or a planning or public service agency. Prerequisite: Approval of Director or Dean of the School of Architecture.

ARCH 4423 Urban Planning: 3 semester hours.

Study of theories and concepts concerning the structure and function of urban communities; spatial and temporal aspects of urban development; problems and consequences of planned and unplanned changes in urban society.

ARCH 4433 Structural Systems II: 3 semester hours.

A study of theory, behavior and design of structural systems in steel and timber.
Prerequisites: ARCH 3293.

ARCH 4443 CAD Construction Documents and Codes: 3 semester hours.

The organization, development and preparation of a complete set of working drawings using computer aided design.
Prerequisites: ARCH 2223.

ARCH 4456 Architecture Design VII: 6 semester hours.

Exploration of urban design and the human and environmental impact of individual designs in the built environment.
Prerequisites: ARCH 3266.

ARCH 4476 Architecture Design VIII: 6 semester hours.

Advanced problems in architecture and planning.
Prerequisites: ARCH 4456.

ARCH 4503 Methods of Research: 3 semester hours.

Study and application of research and programming in architecture.

ARCH 4523 Historic Preservation and Adaptive Reuse: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the methods and practices of preservation and reuse of architectural heritage.

ARCH 4613 Landscape Architecture: 3 semester hours.

Principles of site development as related to climate, topography, and intended use.

ARCH 4633 Net Zero Energy Design I: 3 semester hours.

Passive House Certification principles and methodologies including design strategies, energy modeling and construction details and processes.

ARCH 4643 Net Zero Energy Design II: 3 semester hours.

Passive and active design strategies for reducing energy use in buildings followed by on-site renewable energy applications to achieve net zero energy use.

ARCH 4653 Alternative Energy Design: 3 semester hours.

Optimum energy use strategies for buildings, energy audit methods, solar system applications, passive energy application and life-cycle cost analysis.

ARCH 4673 Introduction to Interior Design: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the profession and practice of interior design.

ARCH 4683 Interior Design II: 3 semester hours.

Interior Design II will provide an advanced understanding in designing and detailing interior architecture, exploring the production of interior mechanical, millwork drawings, and Construction Documents.

ARCH 4733 Advanced Computer Aided Design: 3 semester hours.

Comprehensive architectural design and presentation using 2- and 3 - modeling software. Emphasis on the role electronic media in the visualization of design projects.
Prerequisites: ARCH 2223.

ARCH 4743 Building Information Modeling: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the fundamentals of Building Information Modeling and how they apply to the design and construction industry and a technology enabled workforce. Introduction to the methods of creation, evaluation and exchange of Building Information Models. Leveraging BIM and 4D modeling for construction optimization and sustainable building initiatives.

ARCH 4753 Introduction to Geographical Information Systems: 3 semester hours.

Concepts and techniques of utilizing geographic information systems to study and model environmental issues including methods of creating, analyzing and displaying GIS data utilizing industry standard software. Global positioning systems (GPS) will be introduced as a means of creating GIS data.

ARCH 4776 Urban Design Studio: 6 semester hours.

Projects with a focus on urban issues and context.

ARCH 4973 Special Topics: 3 semester hours.

The study of various specialized fields of architecture as they relate to contemporary social issues. Topics vary by semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary.

ARCH 4986 Special Projects: 6 semester hours.

Unique design studio projects tailored to learning objectives. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: ARCH 2266.

ARCH 4996 Independent Study: 1-6 semester hour.

Readings, research, and/or field work on selected topics.

ARCH 5423 Urban Planning: 3 semester hours.

Study of theories and concepts concerning the structure and function of urban communities; spatial and temporal aspects of urban development; problems and consequences of planned and unplanned changes in urban society.

ARCH 5483 Structural Systems III: 3 semester hours.

Structural design and analysis of building systems in steel and reinforced concrete; long spans, lateral forces, connections, code requirements, and economics of structural systems.
Prerequisites: ARCH 4433.

ARCH 5506 Internship: 6 semester hours.

Approved summer internship in an architecture office, the building construction industry or a planning or public service agency or approved foreign study program. Appropriate documentation of the experience will be required.

ARCH 5513 Research Seminar: 3 semester hours.

Research and programming for the Comprehensive Project Studio.

ARCH 5523 Historic Preservation and Adaptive Reuse: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the methods and practices of preservation and reuse of architectural heritage.

ARCH 5566 Architecture Design IX: 6 semester hours.

Advanced design studio with emphasis on comprehensive architectural design projects.

ARCH 5579 Comprehensive Project Studio: 9 semester hours.

A comprehensive design project based on research and programming accomplished in ARCH 5513.

ARCH 5593 Professional Practice: 3 semester hours.

The ethical, legal and administrative responsibilities of the architect. Relationships between the architect, the client, and the contractor involved in comprehensive architectural services and emerging techniques of practice.

ARCH 5743 Building Information Modeling: 3 semester hours.

Exploring the fundamentals of Building Information Modeling and how they apply to the design and construction industry and a technology enabled workforce. Exploring the methods of creation, evaluation and exchange of Building Information Models. Leveraging BIM and 4D modeling for construction optimization and sustainable building initiatives.

ARCH 5973 Special Topics: 3 semester hours.

The study of various specialized fields of architecture as they relate to contemporary social or technical issues. Topics vary by semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary.

ARCH 5976 Special Topics: 6 semester hours.

Design studio with a focus on a particular issue or area of architecture. Topics vary by semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary.

ARCH 5986 Special Projects: 6 semester hours.

Design projects of differing lengths and content with group or individual involvement. May be repeated for credit.

ARCH 5996 Independent Study: 1-6 semester hour.

Readings, research, and/or field work on selected topics. Prerequisite: Consent of advisor.

Art Courses

ARTS 1001 Art Seminar I: 1 semester hour.

Informational seminar meeting once a week to allow staff members and art majors and minors to discuss contemporary visual art developments.

ARTS 1021 Art Seminar II: 1 semester hour.

Informational seminar meeting once a week to allow staff members and art majors and minors to discuss contemporary visual art developments.

ARTS 1113 Design I: 3 semester hours.

Study of the elements and concepts of two-dimensional design.

ARTS 1123 Design II: 3 semester hours.

A continuation of Design I with emphasis on 1. Research and concept development. 2. Form and composition relationships, and 3. Hand-crafted 3-dimensional media experimentation.
Prerequisites: ARTS 1113.

ARTS 1153 Drawing I: 3 semester hours.

An introductory course investigating a variety of media and techniques.

ARTS 1173 Creative Thinking: 3 semester hours.

This course seeks to increase students' understanding of the creative process, to allow students to explore different techniques for developing ideas by studying interdisciplinary examples of creativity and applying them in common professional design situations.
Prerequisites: ARTS 1113.

ARTS 1183 Drawing II: 3 semester hours.

The study of the human anatomy and structural dynamics.

ARTS 1203 Introduction to Visual Arts: 3 semester hours.

An introductory course that emphasizes an understanding and appreciation for the visual arts (painting, drawing, sculpture, architecture, crafts etc.).

ARTS 1213 Digital Studio Art: 3 semester hours.

Painting, drawing and sculpture using both traditional and digital techniques.

ARTS 2133 Ceramics: 3 semester hours.

Investigation and practice in ceramic processes, forming and firing techniques.

ARTS 2193 Painting: 3 semester hours.

Basic principles and elements of painting.

ARTS 2223 History of Art I: 3 semester hours.

A survey of painting, sculpture, architecture and the minor arts from prehistoric times to the 13th century.

ARTS 2233 History of Art II: 3 semester hours.

Art from the 13th Century to contemporary times including Europe, Asia, the Far East and the Americas.

ARTS 2243 Introduction to African Arts: 3 semester hours.

Survey of the visual expressions and experiences shaping African art from its inception to the present.

ARTS 2283 African American Art: 3 semester hours.

A survey of African American art from the post-Civil War to present, linking with the Arts of the African continent.

ARTS 2313 Graphic Design Hist: 3 semester hours.

Survey and examination of the historical events, technological developments and fine arts movements that have influenced the current state of graphic design.

ARTS 2353 Color Theory: 3 semester hours.

Exploration of the language of color focusing on color properties and relationships, expressive qualities and symbolic meanings.
Prerequisites: ARTS 1113.

ARTS 2363 Sign + Symbol: 3 semester hours.

Investigation of images and symbols and their meanings within different contexts and employing various image-making techniques.
Prerequisites: ARTS 1153.

ARTS 3113 Oil Painting I: 3 semester hours.

Explores the potentials of oil painting media, with emphasis on technique and composition.
Prerequisites: ARTS 2193.

ARTS 3123 Advanced Advertising Art III: 3 semester hours.

Course develops students' ability to deal with design problems of various print media from concept through comprehensive layout including the computers.

ARTS 3143 Sculpture I: 3 semester hours.

An exploration of various sculptural approaches in a variety of media, including additive and subtractive techniques.

ARTS 3173 Watercolor: 3 semester hours.

Study and practice in planning and execution of painting in transparent and opaque watercolor.

ARTS 3193 Printmaking: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to basic printmaking techniques, with emphasis on the proper use of tools and equipment.

ARTS 3323 Typography I: 3 semester hours.

Study and exploration into the history of type, expressive qualities of letterform and visual arrangement of type to support content.

ARTS 3343 Graphic Design Proc: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to production and traditional and digital pre-press procedures for print design.

ARTS 3513 Crafts Design: 3 semester hours.

The study of several crafts including clay, fibers, paper, textiles and plaster.

ARTS 4103 Creative Photography I: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to basic photographic processes and techniques used as an art medium.

ARTS 4133 Printmaking II: 3 semester hours.

Exploration of ideas using various printmaking media and techniques. This course builds upon Printmaking I (ARTS 3193) relief fundamentals and introduces additional print processes and combinations of those processes to allow individual expression, with an emphasis in Green Intaglio, Lithography, and Screen Printing.
Prerequisites: ARTS 3193.

ARTS 4193 Studio Thesis: 3 semester hours.

Emphasis on preparing students for Senior Art Exhibition.

ARTS 4213 Book Arts: 3 semester hours.

Introduces intermediate concepts in book arts and papermaking. This class will involve concepts in printing, binding papermaking and interdisciplinary media, and will discuss contemporary theories and approaches in the book arts field. Students learn several bookbinding and hand papermaking methods in order to provide a foundation for the development of concept-driven artists' book.

ARTS 4993 Independent Study in Studio Art: 3 semester hours.

Individual studies in studio art.

Community Development Courses

CODE 5013 Introduction to Community Development: 3 semester hours.

This course will examine the nature and role of community development activities as a strategey to increase the assets a community has at its disposal to solve problems. The course explores both local government and not-for-profit sector organizations with a focus on partnership and corporations. The role and responsibilities of a consensus organizer in the CD process will be examined.

CODE 5016 Community Development Studio I: 6 semester hours.

A selection of supervised field trips, case studies, research projects and other hands-on community experiences to give students a contextual understanding of the community development profession.

CODE 5023 Advanced Community Development: 3 semester hours.

Advanced studies in the history, theory and practice of community development.
Prerequisites: CODE 5013.

CODE 5026 Community Development Studio II: 6 semester hours.

Projects and case studies applying community development theory.
Prerequisites: CODE 5023 (may be taken concurrently).

CODE 5033 Community Dev Studio: 3 semester hours.

Research projects and hands on experience to give students a contextual understanding of the community development profession. The focus of this class will be on the social and physical aspects of a community's development.

CODE 5043 Community Dev Practicum I: 3 semester hours.

Laboratory and supervised practical experience in a community-based organization. Students will be involved in the actual operation of a community organization. The focus of this class will be on management, economics and political aspects of implementing community projects.

CODE 5063 Commun Dev Prac II: 3 semester hours.

Laboratory and supervised practical experience in a community-based organization. Students will be involved in the actual operation of a community organization. The focus of this class will be on management, economics and political aspects of implementing community projects. This course is a continuation of CODE 5043.

CODE 5073 Comm Dev Financing: 3 semester hours.

Non-traditional financing strategies will be studied to support projects addressing the development of distressed communities.

CODE 5083 Demograhpy & GIS: 3 semester hours.

This course will introduce students to the use of demography and geographic information systems (GIS) in the design and development of communities. This course is designed to enhance student's research skills with GIS technology.

CODE 5093 Coll Community Project Studio: 3 semester hours.

Multi-disciplinary (fields of business, social science, architecture, civil engineering, nursing, health science, construction science, criminal and juvenile justice, and urban planning) research projects and other hands-on community experiences to give students a contextual understanding of the field of community development within their disciplines.

CODE 5103 Cultural Heritage Preservation: 3 semester hours.

This course will explore the history and theory of historic preservation in the United States and an overview of the professional practice of preserving the cultural and physical heritage of buildings, structures, sites and communities will be examined.

CODE 5113 Historic Preservation Material Conservation: 3 semester hours.

This course will examine preservation standards, the regulatory environment and professional practices related to building preservation and adaptive use.

CODE 5123 Historic Preservation: 3 semester hours.

This course will explore research skills and the historic designation process of buildings and districts at the local, state, and national levels.

CODE 5133 Recording Historic Building Sites: 3 semester hours.

Documenting according to Historic American Building Survey (H.A.B.S.) standards.

CODE 5143 Presv Law & Econ: 3 semester hours.

This course will provide students with a working understanding of the governing laws that are used in a professional historic preservation practice.

CODE 5203 Introduction to Community Leadership: 3 semester hours.

Identifying and anticipating future leaders of communities through selected programs.

CODE 5213 Negotiation, Mediation and Facilitation: 3 semester hours.

Skill building strategies and exercises in critical thinking, listening and identity based communications.

CODE 5303 Community Political Structure: 3 semester hours.

The role and function of public and private organizations and local, state and national government in the community development process.

CODE 5313 Community Management and Leadership: 3 semester hours.

The theory and practice of leadership and management in various community development related settings.

CODE 5323 Community Analysis: 3 semester hours.

The basic skills of studying and understanding the structure, function, goals, standards and performance of a community.

CODE 5343 Community Research: 3 semester hours.

Methods for recognizing information needs, sources and applications.

CODE 5363 Community Physical Structure: 3 semester hours.

The physical context of the community and its impact on community health and development.

CODE 5406 Internship: 6 semester hours.

Approved internship with a community development related organization.

CODE 5503 Capital Development: 3 semester hours.

Fundraising strategies and relationship building.

CODE 5513 Grant Development: 3 semester hours.

This course will examine the process of securing and managing resources to support effective nonprofit projects and community development activities.

CODE 5523 Campaigns And Gifts: 3 semester hours.

Campaign strategic planning and techniques used in driving donor decisions.

CODE 5543 Research for Capital and Grant Development: 3 semester hours.

Research for fundraising efforts.

CODE 5603 Land Development and Planning in Declining Communities: 3 semester hours.

This course will explore techniques used to identify and acquire vacant or unmanaged properties in depressed neighborhoods. The course examines challenges, social and other influences and changes throughout the world, with a special emphasis upon less industralized area.

CODE 5613 Land Development and Use Control Strategies: 3 semester hours.

This course will introduce students to the basic principles of land and real estate development. The course will provide an overview of the development process, the land development team, site analysis reading development drawings and environmental issues.

CODE 5743 Global Community Development in the United States: 3 semester hours.

This course will explore the role of immigrants, non-U.S. citizens, and foreign investors in developing rural and urban America. The course will examine the role of immigration on shaping the social and economic form of American cities and suburbs, and the role of histroric preservations in economic development.

CODE 5753 International Community Development Policies and Practices: 3 semester hours.

The role of government and private organizations in developing distressed foreign communities.

CODE 5803 Principles of Real Estate I: 3 semester hours.

This course will introduce students to the basic principles of the real estate profession. Licensing requirements and the Texas Real Estate Licensing Act are covered. This course satisfies one of the core course requirements to apply for a State of Texas Real Estate License.

CODE 5813 Principles of Real Estate II: 3 semester hours.

This course will introduce students to real world practices through the use of lectures, guest speakers, and case studies. This course will expose students to the many activities involved in real estate transactions. This course satisfies one of the core course requirements to apply for a State of Texas Real Estate License.
Prerequisites: CODE 5803.

CODE 5823 Law of Agency: 3 semester hours.

This course covers the representation of property owners, buyers and/or intermediaries. This course satisfies one of the core course requirements to apply for a State of Texas Real Estate License.

CODE 5833 Law of Contract: 3 semester hours.

This course covers FHA, VA and Conventional contracts. Students will be exposed to the applications of property acquisition contracts. This course satisfies one of the core course requirement to apply for a State of Texas Real Estate License.
Prerequisites: CODE 5823.

CODE 5903 Community Art: 3 semester hours.

A study on the influence of community arts and its impact on society. This course will explore the impact of art as a means of communication and expression. The historical context will include studies of the Paleolithic cave writings to modem day murals and graffiti.

CODE 5993 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Individual reading, research and/or field work in selected topics.

CODE 5996 Independent Study: 6 semester hours.

Individual reading, research and/or field work in selected topics.

Construction Science Courses

CONS 3533 Managing Construction Operations: 3 semester hours.

Managing construction operations from concepts of project selection, estimating, bidding, scheduling, subcontracting practices, cost tracking, project documentation, construction bonds, insurance, payments and the elements of close out. Special emphasis on the development of professional communication skills through student prepared multi-media presentations.

CONS 3633 Surveying and Soils: 3 semester hours.

Principles of surveying; use of surveying instruments, topographical surveys and traverses; field practice and computations. Basic considerations of site management and soils considerations for construction projects.

CONS 4403 Construction Internship: 3 semester hours.

Approved internship in the construction industry.

CONS 4406 Construction Internship: 6 semester hours.

Approved internship in the construction industry.

CONS 4413 Residential Construction: 3 semester hours.

Residential construction processes, scheduling, subcontracting, financing, estimating, project control and current trends in site selection, design and energy efficiency.

CONS 4423 Commercial Construction: 3 semester hours.

Focus on the project management of commercial construction projects ranging from high rise office buildings to small tilt-wall and pre-engineered buildings; topics include project acquisitions, mobilization, management, and close out.

CONS 4433 Industrial Construction: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to industrial construction with an emphasis on process and power plant construction from a field office management perspective.

CONS 4443 Highway/Heavy Construction: 3 semester hours.

Focus on the various aspects of highway/heavy construction; topics include earthmoving and paving equipment and utilization principles, pavement design and placement methods, unit price bidding methods, and a project case study.

CONS 4453 Facilities Management: 3 semester hours.

Focus on the various aspects of facilities management; includes budgeting for operations and management, energy management, change management, design-build changes, in house versus outsource maintenance, and contracting options.

CONS 4553 Construction Delivery Systems: 3 semester hours.

Methods and management techniques utilized in the building process.

CONS 4603 Construction Labor and Safety: 3 semester hours.

Constitutional and legal basis of labor relations in the construction industry; craft and trade unions; dual and merit shop operations; contractor-union agreements; safety on the job site; OSHA and related regulations.

CONS 4633 Construction Law and Ethics: 3 semester hours.

Delineation of contracts used in the construction industry; emphasis on understanding the functions and interrelationships of documents; review of law applied to the industry; application of the contract, and law to case studies; introduction to resources and analytical process used by construction professionals; ethics in the construction industry.

CONS 4753 Scheduling and Mobilization: 3 semester hours.

Project scheduling procedures to include computer applications and resource leveling; project types, office and field planning required to initiate the work; equipment and construction methods selection processes and an examination of contractual mandates specified.

CONS 4773 Construction Project Controls: 3 semester hours.

Introduction of students to construction related financial documents; includes schedule of values, labor and operations cost reports, and construction budgets, trace construction dollar flow from time sheet to balance sheet.

CONS 4993 Independent Study: 1-3 semester hour.

Individual reading, research and/or field work in selected topics.

Digital Media Arts Courses

DGMA 2173 Fundamentals of Digital Imaging: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to basic image manipulation and vector-based graphic creation with emphasis on technical proficiency, artistic mastery, aesthetic judgment, photographic enhancement and multi-image composition.
Prerequisites: ARTS 1153.

DGMA 2183 Fundamentals of Interactive Media: 3 semester hours.

This course is an introduction design principles of interactive website design with an emphasis on technical proficiency, interface design, usability, and aesthetic appeal.
Prerequisites: DGMA 2173.

DGMA 3123 Layout I: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to functionality of basic page design with emphasis on design process, grid hierarchy, and conceptual integration of type and image.
Prerequisites: ARTS 1113 and ARTS 1123 and ARTS 1153 and ARTS 2353 and ARTS 2363.
Co-requisites: DGMA 3323, DGMA 3343.

DGMA 3133 Layout II: 3 semester hours.

Further development of ability to work conceptually with design problems using multi-page layouts. Topics include concept development, complex sequencing and collateral work.
Prerequisites: DGMA 3123.
Co-requisites: DGMA 3333, DGMA 3343.

DGMA 3323 Typography I: 3 semester hours.

Study and exploration into the history of type expressive qualities of letterforms, and visual arrangement of type to support content.
Prerequisites: ARTS 1113 and ARTS 1123 and ARTS 1153 and ARTS 2353 and ARTS 2363.
Co-requisites: DGMA 3123, DGMA 3343.

DGMA 3333 Typography II: 3 semester hours.

Continuation of Typography I incorporating more advanced and complex problems.
Prerequisites: DGMA 3323.
Co-requisites: DGMA 3133, DGMA 3353.

DGMA 3343 Branding: 3 semester hours.

Examination of corporate brand identity development. Topics include logo development, product packaging, marketing collateral, web and social media branding, and broadcast advertising development.
Prerequisites: ARTS 1113 and ARTS 1123 and ARTS 1153 and ARTS 2353 and ARTS 2363.
Co-requisites: DGMA 3123, DGMA 3323.

DGMA 3353 Interactive Media: 3 semester hours.

Focus on web-based visual communication strategies through the design and creation of interactive projects.
Prerequisites: DGMA 3343.
Co-requisites: DGMA 3133, DGMA 3333.

DGMA 4143 Problems in Media Arts I: 3 semester hours.

Advanced examination of visual communication combining theoretical studies with applied problems in graphic design.
Prerequisites: DGMA 3133.
Co-requisites: DGMA 4163, DGMA 4183.

DGMA 4153 Problems in Media Arts II: 3 semester hours.

Advanced examination of visual communication combining theoretical studies with applied problems in graphic design.
Prerequisites: DGMA 4143.
Co-requisites: DGMA 4173, DGMA 4193.

DGMA 4163 Advanced Interactive Media: 3 semester hours.

Examination of essential methodologies, conceptual skills, and technical knowledge vital to the design, programming and implementation of interactive digital media.
Prerequisites: DGMA 3353.
Co-requisites: DGMA 4143, DGMA 4183.

DGMA 4173 Social Media Design: 3 semester hours.

Continuation of DGMA 4163 with an emphasis on applying the principles and practices of social media design to the development of social media campaigns and problems in graphic design.
Prerequisites: DGMA 4163.
Co-requisites: DGMA 4153, DGMA 4193.

DGMA 4183 Motion Graphics: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to fundamental concepts for motion graphics with an emphasis on graphic storytelling, storyboarding and screen composition.
Prerequisites: DGMA 3333.
Co-requisites: DGMA 4143, DGMA 4163.

DGMA 4193 Senior Studio Thesis: 3 semester hours.

Emphasis on preparing students for Senior Art Exhibition.
Prerequisites: DGMA 4183.
Co-requisites: DGMA 4153, DGMA 4173.

DGMA 4203 Special Topics in Digital Media Arts: 3 semester hours.

Examination of current design industry theories, programs, technologies and trends.