Department of Justice Studies

Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice and Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice with Specialization in Juvenile Justice

Purpose and Goals

The Criminal Justice Program is designed to produce proficient graduates who can excel in various aspects of the field in leadership, service, research, and innovation. Criminal Justice majors will have the benefit of an informed and caring faculty to challenge them in their preparation to meet the demands of today’s workplace and the nation’s most rigorous graduate programs. Our undergraduate programs are designed to produce graduates who are skilled in improving the life experiences of youths in the juvenile/criminal justice system, law enforcement, and child-helping organizations.  Our undergraduate programs are also designed to ensure students acquire the knowledge and research skill to enter graduate programs in their chosen areas of specialization.

Instructional Organization

    Undergraduate Degree Programs in Criminal Justice

The College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology offers undergraduate courses leading to the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in the following areas for the Criminal Justice Programs.

Program Degree Offered
Criminal JusticeB.S.C.J.
Criminal Justice with Specialization in Juvenile JusticeB.S.C.J.-J.J.

Academic Standards and Academic Progress

Only courses passed with grades of "C" or higher may be applied to the forty-two (42) semester hours constituting the Major Requirements for Criminal Justice.

Criminal Justice Degree Program Requirements

Core Curriculum42
College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology Language Requirements6
Foreign Language Electives (One Language; One Sequence). Criminal Justice majors must complete 6 semester hours of one language to satisfy the foreign language requirement. 1
Support Area Requirement 3
Statistics
Major Requirements for Criminal Justice
CRJS 1133Principles of Criminal Justice3
CRJS 2413Police Systems and Practices3
CRJS 2513Corrections: Systems and Practices3
CRJS 2613Court Systems and Practices3
CRJS 2713Juvenile Justice Systems3
CRJS 3623Criminal Law I3
CRJS 3823Criminal Justice Research Methods I3
CRJS 4923Criminology3
CRJS 4983Ethical Decision-Making in Criminal Justice3
Criminal Justice Electives15
Minor/Unrestricted Electives 127
Total Hours120
1

Students may use their unrestricted electives to complete a minor. The student is responsible for ensuring that all of the requirements are met. Students are advised to select minors in areas that are supportive of the criminal justice field such as psychology, human development, sociology, social work, political science, economics, or foreign language. If the minor requires less than 27 credit hours the difference should be made up in unrestricted electives. If no minor is selected, the total unrestricted electives would be 27 hours. Students are advised to select electives in areas that are supportive of the criminal justice field.

Minor in Criminal Justice for Majors in other Disciplines

CRJS 1133Principles of Criminal Justice3
CRJS 2413Police Systems and Practices3
CRJS 2513Corrections: Systems and Practices3
CRJS 2613Court Systems and Practices3
CRJS 2713Juvenile Justice Systems3
CRJS 3623Criminal Law I3
CRJS 4923Criminology3
CRJS 4983Ethical Decision-Making in Criminal Justice3
Criminal Justice Elective3
Total Hours27

Criminal Justice Suggested Degree Program Sequence

Freshman
Fall - Semester 1HoursSpring - Semester 2Hours
CRJS 11333CRJS 25133
ENGL 11233ENGL 11333
MATH 11133POSC 11233
POSC 11133Natural Science3
Profesional Development Area 2 3Visual and Performing Arts 3
Total15Total15
Sophomore
Fall - Semester 1HoursSpring - Semester 2Hours
CRJS 26133CRJS 27133
HIST 13133CRJS 24133
Natural Science3HIST 13233
Foreign Language I3Foreign Language II3
Unrestricted Elective 3Social/Behavioral Science3
Total15Total15
Junior
Fall - Semester 1HoursSpring - Semester 2Hours
Statistics3CRJS 38233
CRJS 36233CRJS Elective3
Two CRJS Electives6Unrestricted Elective3
Unrestricted Elective 3Humanities3
 Professional Development Area 13
Total15Total15
Senior
Fall - Semester 1HoursSpring - Semester 2Hours
CRJS 49233CRJS 49833
CRJS Elective3CRJS Elective3
Three Unrestricted Electives 9Three Unrestricted Electives 9
Total15Total15
Total Hours: 120

Criminal Justice with Specialization in Juvenile Justice Degree Program Requirements

Core Curriculum42
College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology Language Requirements6
Foreign Language Electives (One Language; One Sequence)
Support Area Requirements3
Statistics
Major Requirements for Criminal Justice with Juvenile Justice Specialization
CRJS 1133Principles of Criminal Justice3
CRJS 2413Police Systems and Practices3
CRJS 2513Corrections: Systems and Practices3
CRJS 2613Court Systems and Practices3
CRJS 2713Juvenile Justice Systems3
CRJS 2723Theories and Development of Juvenile Gangs3
CRJS 2743Law of Juvenile Justice3
CRJS 3623Criminal Law I3
CRJS 3733Juvenile Probation and Parole3
CRJS 3823Criminal Justice Research Methods I3
CRJS 4923Criminology3
CRJS 4983Ethical Decision-Making in Criminal Justice3
Two Criminal Justice Electives6
Minor/unrestricted electives 127
Total Hours120
1

Students may use their unrestricted electives to complete a minor.  The student is responsible for ensuring that all of the requirements are met.  Students are advised to select minors in areas that are supportive of the criminal justice field such as psychology, human development, sociology, social work, political science, economics or foreign language.  If the minor requires less than 27 credit hours the difference should be made up in unrestricted electives.  If no minor is selected, the total unrestricted electives would be 27 hours.  Students are advised to select electives in areas that are supportive of the criminal justice field. 

Criminal Justice with Specialization in Juvenile Justice Suggested Degree Program Sequence

Freshman
Fall - Semester 1HoursSpring - Semester 2Hours
CRJS 11333CRJS 25133
ENGL 11233ENGL 11333
MATH 11133POSC 11233
POSC 11133Natural Science3
Professional Development Area 23Visual and Performing Arts3
Total15Total15
Sophomore
Fall - Semester 1HoursSpring - Semester 2Hours
CRJS 26133CRJS 27133
HIST 13133CRJS 24133
Natural Science3HIST 13233
Foreign Language I3Foreign Language II3
Unrestricted Elective 3Social/Behavioral Science 3
Total15Total15
Junior
Fall - Semester 1HoursSpring - Semester 2Hours
CRJS 36233CRJS 38233
CRJS 27233CRJS 27433
CRJS Elective3Humanities 3
Statistics 3Professional Development Area 13
Unrestricted Elective 3Unrestricted Elective 3
Total15Total15
Senior
Fall - Semester 1HoursSpring - Semester 2Hours
CRJS 49233CRJS 49833
CRJS 37333CRJS Elective3
Three Unrestricted Electives 9Three Unrestricted Electives 9
Total15Total15
Total Hours: 120

Honor Societies, Clubs and Service Organizations

Alpha Phi Sigma - National Honor Society in Criminal Justice . The Honor Society was created to recognize scholarship among students of Criminal Justice and provide them with opportunities to attend various conferences sponsored by the national organization. Students are also provided information about opportunities in careers in Criminal Justice as well as educational opportunities in graduate and professional schools.

National Association of Blacks in Criminal Justice - Student Division . This is a national organization of Criminal Justice Professionals who provide its members with current information about the field of Criminal Justice. The Prairie View Chapter provides its members with opportunities to attend various conferences sponsored by the national organization and regional chapters. Students also have access to career counseling and information about career opportunities with various federal, state, and local agencies.

The Criminal Justice Club . This organization is open to any student majoring or minoring in Criminal Justice at this institution. The primary purpose of the organization is to provide its members with information about career opportunities and graduate and professional educational opportunities in the field. They also provide a forum for various recruiters to speak to its members and they also take field trips to area criminal justice agencies to observe and speak with professionals.

Homeland Security/ Emergency Management Certificate (12 credits)
 

The Undergraduate Certificate can be taken independently of other degree programs or, as part of a degree program and does not require full enrollment in the university.  All students in the certificate program receive full Prairie View A&M University course credit that can later be applied toward a degree.

This program is designed to introduce students to the homeland security enterprise and emergency management. Students will learn about the creation of the Department of Homeland Security, its goals and the knowledge and skills necessary for effective emergency management. Students will have the opportunity to select electives to complete the program that will allow them to explore homeland security and emergency management within their major or other focus area. Students must take at least one upper level course to complete the certificate. A project that brings the relevant knowledge together is required to complete the program. This certificate program addresses the workforce need for diversity in homeland security and emergency management by exposing students to these two career areas. It is also designed to serve the land grant mission of the university by responding to community needs with particular attention to rural communities.

OBJECTIVES

  • To have awareness of the varied aspects of work in homeland security
  • To have awareness of the nature of work in emergency management
  • To understand the applicability of homeland security and emergency management to the student’s major or focus area
  • To be able to contribute to efficacious homeland security and emergency management operations

The certificate includes six credits of required courses, six hours of electives courses from the options indicated and, a social responsibility (civic engagement) project. The project may be completed in conjunction with any of the courses for the certificate as pre-approved by the certificate administrator in the College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology. Pre-approval of the electives will require a review of the syllabus to be used for relevant content. Typically, the required project will begin during enrollment in CRJS 2483 but may not be completed until the final course is taken for the certificate. The project must have real world applicability. As such, it will be completed with consultation involving relevant persons in the targeted community, government, business or private entity. This effort might be coordinated with assistance from the university’s Office of Student Affairs (therein, the service learning/volunteer coordination office), and, or Texas A&M University – College Station.  A typical project would be the creation of a disaster response plan, a disaster mitigation plan, a homeland security research paper or participation in a day long simulation exercise with a paper requirement.

REQUIRED

CRJS 2443 Introduction to Homeland Security (required)

CRJS 2483 Introduction to Emergency Management (required)

CRJS 2483 Introduction to Emergency Management 3 SCH This course presents the theories, principles, and approaches to managing both natural and man-made emergencies. The philosophy of Comprehensive Emergency Management will be discussed with the four attendant steps which include mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. An analysis of past disasters will be presented along with their impacts on policy formation leading up to the current FEMA all-hazards approach.  The role, duties, and importance of the Emergency Manager will be discussed.  Finally, legal issues involving emergency management will be presented.

CRJS 2443 Introduction to Homeland Security: 3 SCH The course will introduce students to the history of the Department of Homeland Security as a federal entity and homeland security as an area of study in the United States. It will include major research and theoretical perspectives that have resulted in significant initiatives to keep persons in the United States safe from various threats.

………………………………………………………………………………………………….

Electives *(at least one course must be an upper level course):

Recommended for Psychology Majors

PSYC 2513 Personality: 3 semester hours.

Personality theories, major concepts, methods and problems in the field of psychology. Analysis of theories of personality, with emphasis on personality development in the normal population. Evaluation of theories in the field of psychology. The development of personality as a pattern of strivings manifested in interpersonal relations. The coverage of constitutional, psychological, social and cultural factors in the development and adjustment of the normal individual. **(PSYC 2316)**Transfer equivalent from Texas Community/Junior Colleges

PSYC 3713 Psychology of Terrorism

This course is designed to assist students in becoming more aware of factors that may contribute to the development of terroristic attitudes and behaviors. Students will learn how to define terrorism and distinguish different kinds of terroristic groups, which include juvenile terrorist groups, racial supremacists groups, and foreign terrorist groups. Students will learn about environmental, cultural, familial factors related to terroristic activity.

Recommended for Criminal Justice Majors

CRJS 2113 Intro Geog Info Sys: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the fundamentals of Geographic Information System (GIS) and science and art of making maps. The course introduces students to the basic principles of using GIS as tool for managing and analyzing spatial data.

CRJS 2453 Introduction to Terrorism: 3 semester hours.

The study of the history and development of terrorism the various types of terrorism, including narcoterrorism, religious terrorism, state-sponsored terrorism and domestic terrorism. Emphasis will be placed on counter-terrorism program

CRJS 2813 Computer Applications in Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the interface necessary for functioning effectively in various areas of criminal justice. The course also examines how the use of computers and related technology has changed the process of maintaining law and order nationally and internationally. It includes a review of social engineering techniques (ways that people might enhance personal and institutional security) and the field of computer forensics

CRJS 3463 Transnational Crimes: 3 semester hours.

The study of criminal behavior that transcends traditional national boundaries. The course will focus on the origins of these types of crimes and the efforts of law enforcement to address them. Cyber-terrorism, cyber-crimes, human trafficking, drug trafficking and patrimonial crimes will be reviewed

CRJS 3673 International and Federal Criminal Law: 3 semester hours.

The study of the origin purpose of international laws related to homeland security and terrorism and federal criminal law including crimes against persons, property crimes, principles, defenses and a comparison with state criminal law including the Texas Penal Code

CRJS 4323 Criminal Justice Management Principles: 3 semester hours.

A study of basic criminal justice management theories and contemporary practices. This includes an examination of the unique behaviors, social skills and organizational techniques necessary for the criminal justice professional to be successful in various settings. Special attention is given to relating effectively with superiors, colleagues, subordinates and various members of the public impacted by criminal justice agencies

CRJS 4416 Undergraduate Internship in Criminal Justice: 6 semester hours.

A student may be required to satisfactorily complete a minimum of three month's internship in an approved criminal justice setting preferably between the junior and senior year. This internship program is specifically designed to acquaint the student with practical aspects of criminal justice

Recommended for Chemistry Majors

CHEM 1042 General Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory: 2 semester hours.

For students majoring or minoring in chemistry. A continuation of CHEM 1032. General laboratory course covering aspects of volumetric, gravimetric and qualitative analyses; determination of chemical and physical properties, and chemical synthesis. Prerequisite: MATH 1113, Co-requisite: CHEM 1043

CHEM 1043 General Inorganic Chemistry: 3 semester hours.

For students majoring or minoring in chemistry. A continuation of CHEM 1033. Bonding theory and molecular structure, intermolecular forces properties of solutions, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-based equilibria, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry and introduction to organic chemistry. Prerequisites: MATH 1113, CHEM 1033. ** (CHEM 1412) **Transfer equivalent from Texas Community/Junior Colleges

CHEM 2043 General Organic Chemistry II: 3 semester hours.

For chemistry majors and minors, chemical engineering, and science majors. A continuation of CHEM 2033. Substitution and elimination reactions, spectroscopic identification of organic compounds, reactions of substituted benzenes, reactions of carbonyl compounds, bioorganic compounds and special topics in organic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 2033

CHEM 3023 Special Topics in Chemistry w/revolving themes forensic science/emerging areas of interests in Chem: 3 semester hours.

Special Topics in Chemistry with revolving themes around forensic science and emerging areas of interests in Chemistry and Technology. Prerequisite: CHEM 2043 or Departmental approval

Recommended for Engineering Majors

COMP 1013 Introduction to Computer Science: 3 semester hours.

Fundamentals of computer science and programming to include algorithm definition, concepts, semantics and logic, fundamental data types (character, integer, and floating-point) and their binary representations and limits, arithmetic and logical operators and precedence, program structure and flow, branching and looping, functions and parameters, and basic input and output methods, emphasizing modular design and implementation of an object-oriented language such as C++

COMP 4123 Computer Networks: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the networking of computer systems to include the study of local area (LAN) and wide area (W AN) networks, data transmission, communications software, the architecture of networks, and network communication protocols. Prerequisite: COMP 3063

CVEG 3043 Environmental Engineering: 3 semester hours.

Review of the environmental chemistry and biology, introduction to environmental science and engineering, material balance, reaction kinetics, reactor design, introduction to solid and hazardous waste, water and wastewater quality characteristics, laboratory analysis of water and wastewater samples. Prerequisites: CHEM 1021, CHEM 1034 and MCEG 2013

Recommended for Business (and related) Majors

MISY 2013 Fundamentals of MIS: 3 semester hours.

The course provides a solid foundation in MIS concepts and theory and gives exposure to current technologies being used in business today. The emphasis is on understanding how information systems are used by managers and professionals to improve organizational performance, teamwork, and productivity. Topics covered include telecommunication, networking, enterprise systems, IT security, and emerging technologies. Prerequisite: MISY 1013 or equivalent

MISY 4452: Special Topics in MIS: 3 semester credit hours.

Topics include network/cyber attacks and defense, system threats and risk. Identifying the threats against network infrastructures and building defensible networks that minimize the impact of attacks; tools that can be used to analyze a network to both prevent and detect the adversary; decode and analyze packets using various tools to identify anomalies and improve network defenses; perform penetration testing against an organization to determine vulnerabilities and points of compromise; creating and running incident handling capability; tools to identify and remediate malware across organizations; data classification program used to deploy data loss prevention solutions at both host and network level; disaster recovery and policy implementation.

Recommended for Management Majors

MGMT 1013 Introduction to Business: 3 semester hours.

An overview of business operations and the role of business in modem society. Topics of current interest to the business community will be introduced

MGMT 3103 Principles of Management: 3 semester hours.

Fundamentals of organization and administration. Planning, organizing, directing, coordinating, and controlling business activities. Goal setting: models for thinking about organizations; organizational design; information systems; models for understanding individual behavior; job performance and job satisfaction; motivation and leadership; behavior in work groups and careers in business. Prerequisite: MGMT 1013, and junior/senior classification

Recommended for Political Science Majors

POSC 2123 Public Administration: 3 semester hours.

This course provides an examination of the organization, responsibility, personnel management, fiscal processes, functions, and problems of public administration. ** (GOVT 2335) **Transfer equivalent from Texas Community/Junior Colleges

POSC 2503 Global Issues: 3 semester hours.

Selected issues facing the global community are examined. Issues include hunger, energy, population, war and racism. The course has interdisciplinary and cross-cultural focus

POSC 2543 State and Local Government: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of state and local governments in the federal system; encompasses an examination of the state and local politics in the United States with an emphasis on politics and public policy

POSC 3513 Comparative Politics: 3 semester hours.

Examines the dynamics of Comparative Politics from the perspective of globalization characterized by the world's increasing interconnectedness, particularly in regards to politics, economics, communication and cultures. Provides a comprehensive analysis of nations encompassing histories, societies, politics and economics. Examines contemporary nations in the context of current trends, including modernization, democracy, the environment, human rights, terrorism, security and globalization. Explores symbolic countries in case studies

POSC 3523 Comparative Politics of Developing States: 3 semester hours.

The course examines political processes in the developing nations of Africa, Asia, and Latin America, with particular attention to the problems of political integration and nation building

POSC 3533 U.S. Foreign Policy: 3 semester hours.

This is a study of the American foreign policy, including the objectives, capabilities and formulation process

POSC 3543 International Politics: 3 semester hours.

The basic problems of international politics, focusing on the power competition among states and other transnational institutions, are the major focus of this course. (Required for all majors and minors)

POSC 3553 African Politics: 3 semester hours.

This is an introductory course in the political history and development of African states

POSC 3593 Middle East Politics: 3 semester hours.

This course makes a comprehensive study of the major issues and dilemmas in contemporary Middle Eastern politics, including the clash of religions and nationalisms, security and stability in the Persian Gulf, the Arab-Israeli conflict, efforts at democratization, and the role of women

POSC 4103 Urban Government and Politics: 3 semester hours.

This course examines the structure and functions of urban government. Considerable attention is given to the politics and current problems of metropolitan areas

For Social Work Majors

SOWK 2133 Social Work with Children and Families: 3 semester hours.

Examination of social and cultural constructs of childhood including history and development of child welfare services; childhood developmental stages; social policy relevant to children, families and their well-being; assessment, intervention and direct services for children and families

SOWK 2173 Multicultural Issues in Mental Health: 3 semester hours.

Exploration of the etiology and treatment modalities for addressing mental health issues with culturally diverse populations including African American, Hispanic American, and Asian American

SOWK 3213 Human and Cultural Diversity Social Work: 3 semester hours.

Acquisition and application of methods, theories, and skills sensitive to a wide variety of human differences for competent social work practice with diverse populations. Effects of prejudice, discrimination, and stereotyping at individual and institutional levels. Advocacy for social and economic justice specific to race, ethnicity, gender, age, religion, disability, social class, nationality, and sexual orientation

SOWK 4176 Field Practicum: 6 semester hours.

Supervised learning experience involving field-based placement in social service agency. Integration of theory and practice. All required social work foundation courses must be completed before entering practicum. Co-requisite: SOWK 4183

SOWK 4343 Generalist Crisis Intervention: 3 semester hours.

Intervention with individuals, families, and communities in crisis using the generalist social work model. Crisis assessment, management and referral

For any major

GEOG/CRJS 2113 Introduction to Geographic Information System: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the fundamentals of Geographic Information System (GIS) and science and art of making maps. The course introduces students to the basic principles of using GIS as tool for managing and analyzing spatial data

GEOG 2633 Cultural Geography: 3 semester hours.

Economic, social, and political adjustments that man makes to various habitats and to natural environment factors

GEOG 3733 Political Geography: 3 semester hours.

This course examines the influence which the natural environment has on the evolution of cultures, the establishment of political boundaries and political systems and on the nature of international trade and politics

Recommended for Business Majors (* at least one upper level course below)

ECON 2123 Principles of Macroeconomics: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of the principles and problems of money and banking, national income, public finance, international trade, and economic growth. **(ECON 2301) ** Transfer equivalent from Texas Community/Junior Colleges

ECON 2113 Principles of Microeconomics: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of the principles and problems of production and distribution, market structure, business enterprise, and comparative economic systems. **(ECON 2302) Prerequisite: Pass all sections of THEA. ** Transfer equivalent from Texas Community/Junior Colleges

ECON 4343 International Trade: 3 semester hours.

Principles and practices of foreign trade with special emphasis on international economic relations. Analysis of foreign exchange, balance of payments, foreign investment, tariff history and policy, and currency problems. Prerequisite: ECON 2123, ECON 2113 and junior/senior classification

FINA 4303 Money and Banking: 3 semester hours.

Covers a wide spectrum of topics and issues in banking and finance, including the role and nature of money in the economy, bank management, technological innovations and the practice of banking, creation and regulation of the money supply and the institutions involved, monetary policies and the role of the Federal Reserve and Treasury Department. Prerequisite: ECON 2123 and junior/senior classification. Cross-listed as ECON 4303

Recommended for Food Science students

GEOG/CRJS 2113 Introduction to Geographic Information System: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the fundamentals of Geographic Information System (GIS) and science and art of making maps. The course introduces students to the basic principles of using GIS as tool for managing and analyzing spatial data

FDSC 3583 Food Quality Assurance and Sanitation: 3 semester hours.

Examination of the elements of a comprehensive quality assurance program. Areas of study include sanitation, pest control, waste disposal, food law regulations, sensory testing, panel selection and training, and experimental design and analysis of data. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Laboratory fee: $15.00

FDSC 3593 Food Bacteriology: 3 semester hours.

Microbiology of human foods and accessory substances. Raw and processed foods, physical, chemical and biological phases of spoilage. Standard industry techniques of inspection and control. Laboratory fee: $15.00

Recommended for Nursing Majors

NURS 4173 Community Health Nursing: 3 semester hours.

This theory course focuses on the synthesis of public health concepts within a preventive framework to promote and maintain the health of communities. The nursing process is used in community assessment, risk identification and application of community health nursing strategies. Prerequisite: NURS 3004, NURS 4163, NURS 4183. Co-requisite: NURS 4272

NURS 4323 Introduction to Disaster/Emergency Preparedness and Response: 3 semester hours.

This course provides a foundation in the principles of disaster planning and management from a disaster team perspective. The roles of different members of the disaster team are examined with a focus on the role of the nurse. Various classifications of disasters, including natural and human-made disasters, are identified and defined and various biological, chemical and nuclear agents are discussed. Nursing care of physical injuries and psychological/behavior manifestations of disaster victims and workers involved in natural and man-made disasters are highlighted. Consent of Instructor. Elective.

Courses

CRJS 1111 Introductory Seminar in Criminal and Juvenile Justice: 1 semester hour.

An overview of the professional opportunities available in criminal justice, juvenile justice and related fields. Students will be introduced to the importance of professional relationship building, the value of internships, and the myriad professional job opportunities available in both juvenile and criminal justice.

CRJS 1123 Crime in America: 3 semester hours.

The course requires that students critically examine and analyze crime issues and trends in America. It includes presentations from active practitioners and researchers in the field of criminal justice on the current state of crime in America and an examination of offenders' rationale for crime. Students will express their ideas effectively through written, oral or visual means. They will compare imperical and quantitative data on typologies of crime, offenders and victims in America. The course addresses cultural and subculutural influences on crime, civic responsibility and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national and global communites toward crime prevention.

CRJS 1133 Principles of Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

Inquiry and evaluation of the principles, philosophy and history of criminal justice including the constitutional restraints imposed on criminal justice officials. Emphasis will be on the criminal justice officials' role in the prevention and control of crime and delinquency. Requires effective written, oral and visual expression of ideas. Students will compare emperical and quantitative data on typologies of crime, offenders and victims in America. The course addresses cultural and sub-cultural influences on crime, justice, civic responsibility and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national and global communities to understand crime and crime prevention.

CRJS 2113 Intro Geog Info Sys: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the fundamentals of Geographic Information System (GIS) and science and art of making maps. The course introduces students to the basic principles of using GIS as tool for managing and analyzing spatial data.

CRJS 2413 Police Systems and Practices: 3 semester hours.

A study of the structural aspects and principles of personnel management, program development, fiscal management, and other major components of police organization. ** (CRIJ 2332) **Transfer equivalent from Texas Community/Junior Colleges.

CRJS 2423 Introduction to Criminal Investigation and Identification: 3 semester hours.

A survey of scientific crime detection methods, the identification and presentation of evidence. Instrumentation, and crime report writing. ** (CRIJ 2314) **Transfer equivalent from Texas Community/Junior Colleges.

CRJS 2433 Police Community Relations: 3 semester hours.

An examination of various aspects of police- community relations. It includes the effects of various forms of policing styles on community dynamics, misperceptions and bias on the part of both communities and the police. Other topics include civil rights and civil liberties as they relate to law enforcement policy. ** (CRIJ 2318, 2326) **Transfer equivalent from Texas Community/Junior Colleges.

CRJS 2443 Introduction to Homeland Security: 3 semester hours.

The course will introduce students to the history of the Department of Homeland Security as a federal entity and homeland security as an area of study in the United States. It will include major research and theoretical perspectives that have resulted in significant initiatives to keep persons in the United States safe from various threats.

CRJS 2453 Introduction to Terrorism: 3 semester hours.

The study of the history and development of terrorism the various types of terrorism, including narcoterrorism, religious terrorism, state-sponsored terrorism and domestic terrorism. Emphasis will be placed on counter-terrorism program.

CRJS 2483 Introduction to Emergency Management: 3 semester hours.

This course presents the theories, principles, and approaches to managing both natural and man-made emergencies. The philosophy of Comprehensive Emergency Management will be discussed with the four attendant steps which include mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. An anlysis of past disasters will be presented along with their impacts on policy formation leading up to the current FEMA all-hazards approach. The role, duties, an importance of the Emergency Manager will be discussed. Finally, legal issues involving emergency management will be presented.

CRJS 2513 Corrections: Systems and Practices: 3 semester hours.

An examination of the organization, administration and management of correctional facilities and programs in the United States. It includes a study of the populations served, sentencing structures and their outcomes for the individuals, families and communities involved.

CRJS 2523 Alternatives to Incarceration: 3 semester hours.

An examination of various correctional alternatives to incarceration including probation, parole, developments in the technological monitoring of offenders, and community-based reintegration and rehabilitation efforts. ** (CRIJ 1321) **Transfer equivalent from Texas Community/Junior Colleges.

CRJS 2613 Court Systems and Practices: 3 semester hours.

The legal procedures for arrest, complaint, presentation before the magistrate, grand jury consideration, indictment or waiver, arraignment, and the admissibility of evidence on these issues; pretrial matters, post-verdict motions, sentencing, and appeal. ** (CRIJ 1306) **Transfer equivalent from Texas Community/Junior Colleges.

CRJS 2643 Criminal Procedure: 3 semester hours.

An examination of the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Amendments regarding search and seizure, warrant requirements, the right to counsel, confessions, and the admissibility of evidence. ** (CRIJ 2323) **Transfer equivalent from Texas Community/Junior Colleges.

CRJS 2663 Evidence Law: 3 semester hours.

A study of Evidence Law with an emphasis on burden of proof, relevance, judicial notices, real and demonstrative evidence (including documents), the Hearsay Rule and its exceptions, privileges, unlawfully obtained evidence, and presumptions of guilt and innocence.

CRJS 2713 Juvenile Justice Systems: 3 semester hours.

An overview of the Juvenile Justice System including research and theoretical perspectives. It includes an in-depth study of the system and early decision-making process with focus on the police, the juvenile courts and the limits on juvenile sanctions. Community-based corrections with a historical perspective on juvenile probation and juvenile aftercare are also examined. A thorough working knowledge of institutionalization in terms of the treatment of juvenile offenders is provided.

CRJS 2723 Theories and Development of Juvenile Gangs: 3 semester hours.

This course is a comprehensive, in-depth coverage of historical and contemporary reactions to juvenile gangs. Among the key areas to be covered will be the legal and social definitions of juvenile delinquency, the theories, the social context, and the institutional responses. An understanding of public policy and its impact on juvenile gangs will complete the course.

CRJS 2743 Law of Juvenile Justice: 3 semester hours.

The course offers an examination of both substantive and procedural laws related to juvenile justice including criminal law, criminal procedure, evidence, and family codes. The course also examines the institutions that enforce these laws and the principal actors involved. Finally, the course examines current trends and projections in juvenile justice.

CRJS 2813 Computer Applications in Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the interface necessary for functioning effectively in various areas of criminal justice. The course also examines how the use of computers and related technology has changed the process of maintaining law and order nationally and internationally. It includes a review of social engineering techniques (ways that people might enhance personal and institutional security) and the field of computer forensics.

CRJS 3313 Policy Analysis: Prevention and Control: 3 semester hours.

A systematic examination of various crime control efforts involving primary and secondary prevention and the implementation of treatment programs.

CRJS 3463 Transnational Crimes: 3 semester hours.

The study of criminal behavior that transcends traditional national boundaries. The course will focus on the origins of these types of crimes and the efforts of law enforcement to address them. Cyber-terrorism, cyber-crimes, human trafficking, drug trafficking and patrimonial crimes will be reviewed.

CRJS 3623 Criminal Law I: 3 semester hours.

A study of basic principles of substantive criminal law which include definitions of crimes against persons. Emphasis is on the Texas Penal Code as it pertains to murder, capital murder, voluntary homicide, criminal negligence, homicide, and sexual offenses. ** (CRIJ 1310) **Transfer equivalent from Texas Community/Junior Colleges.

CRJS 3633 Criminal Law II: 3 semester hours.

A study of the basic principles of substantive criminal law which includes definitions of crime against property. Emphasis is on the Texas Penal Code related to arson, robbery, burglary, theft, forgery, embezzlement, and false pretense.

CRJS 3673 International and Federal Criminal Law: 3 semester hours.

The study of the origin purpose of international laws related to homeland security and terrorism and federal criminal law including crimes against persons, property crimes, principles, defenses and a comparison with state criminal law including the Texas Penal Code.

CRJS 3733 Juvenile Probation and Parole: 3 semester hours.

A survey and analysis of juvenile probation aftercare. The course addresses the history and legal aspects of probation, role and responsibilities of the juvenile probation officer including pre-sentence investigation reports, conducting risk assessment, case planning, caseload supervision, probation officer safety, professional ethics, and trends in the field.

CRJS 3823 Criminal Justice Research Methods I: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to research techniques such as formulating research questions, research design, and data collection methods such as surveys and case studies. The course also examines research ethics, locating data and navigating the special requirements for conducting research with protected populations such as incarcerated adults and juveniles. Students are also introduced to computer applications for research.

CRJS 3933 Minorities and the Criminal Justice System: 3 semester hours.

An analysis of problems frequently encountered by minorities in the American justice system. This includes police-minority confrontations, an examination of possible bias throughout various levels of the justice system and the contributions of minority criminal justice practitioners, scholars, and activists to the development of the field of criminal justice.

CRJS 4323 Criminal Justice Management Principles: 3 semester hours.

A study of basic criminal justice management theories and contemporary practices. This includes an examination of the unique behaviors, social skills and organizational techniques necessary for the criminal justice professional to be successful in various settings. Special attention is given to relating effectively with superiors, colleagues, subordinates and various members of the public impacted by criminal justice agencies.

CRJS 4416 Undergraduate Internship in Criminal Justice: 6 semester hours.

A student may be required to satisfactorily complete a minimum of three month's internship in an approved criminal justice setting preferably between the junior and senior year. This internship program is specifically designed to acquaint the student with practical aspects of criminal justice.

CRJS 4653 Constitutional Rights of the Criminally Accused: 3 semester hours.

A study of the rights of the criminally accused according to the United States Constitution.

CRJS 4833 Seminar: Criminal Justice Research Methods II: 3 semester hours.

Direction in performing an original research project. This involves an examination of how a choice of research question influences methodology. Basic statistical concepts and techniques for obtaining and analyzing large quantitative data sets will be reviewed. The course also examines techniques for conducting qualitative research and a familiarity with the latest qualitative research software packages.

CRJS 4913 Study of Criminal Justice Systems Abroad: 3 semester hours.

An analysis of criminal justice programs and institutions outside of the United States.

CRJS 4923 Criminology: 3 semester hours.

Focus will be a comprehensive analysis of the sociological, psychological and biological aspects of deviant human behavior.

CRJS 4943 Seminar: Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

Focus on recent significant and controversial issues which affect the administration of justice especially in law enforcement, the courts and corrections.

CRJS 4953 Seminar: Special Topics in Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

This course has a revolving theme from semester to semester. Theme areas include but are not limited to policing, courts, corrections, ethics, women and crime, economics and crime, white collar crime, terrorism, consensual crime, victimology, alternative dispute resolution, media influences and special topics in juvenile justice. (May be repeated once for credit as the course theme changes). Department approval required.

CRJS 4963 Philosophy of Crime: 3 semester hours.

An examination of religious and economic principles as they shape the definition and response to crime. This includes an analysis of specific concepts such as guilt, shame, care, love, desire and dignity on the evolution of deviance and crime across time and place in the western world.

CRJS 4973 Women and Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

An ideological and historical analysis of the role of women and criminal justice as reformers, professionals, scholars, and as offenders.

CRJS 4983 Ethical Decision-Making in Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

An overview of ethical theories, concepts, and issues. Illustrates the major unethical themes common in Criminal Justice management. Illustrates ethical dilemmas in policing, courts, prisons, community corrections, and crime prevention. The class works together to develop foundational ethical truths upon which to logically develop practice of moral decision making.

CRJS 4993 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research or fieldwork on selected topics. Prerequisite: Consent of advisor.