Department of Justice Studies

Purpose and Goals

The Criminal Justice Program is designed to produce proficient graduates who can excel in various aspects of the field in leadership, service, research, and innovation. Criminal Justice majors will have the benefit of an informed and caring faculty to challenge them in their preparation to meet the demands of today’s workplace and the nation’s most rigorous graduate programs. Our undergraduate programs are designed to produce graduates who are skilled in improving the life experiences of youths in the juvenile/criminal justice system, law enforcement, and child-helping organizations.  Our undergraduate programs are also designed to ensure students acquire the knowledge and research skill to enter graduate programs in their chosen areas of specialization.

Instructional Organization

The Department of Justice Studies offers degrees in the following areas:

Program Degree Offered
Criminal JusticeB.S.
Criminal Justice with Specialization in Juvenile JusticeB.S.
Juvenile JusticeMS & PhD

Departmental Requirements

Only courses passed with grades of "C" or higher may be applied to the forty-two (42) semester hours constituting the Major Requirements for Criminal Justice.

Criminal Justice Degree Program Requirements

Core Curriculum42
College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology Language Requirements6
Foreign Language Electives (One Language; One Sequence)
Support Area Requirement 3
Select one from the following:
Elementary Statistics
Fundamental of Statistics
Social Statistics
Major Requirements for Criminal Justice
CRJS 1133Principles of Criminal Justice3
CRJS 2413Police Systems and Practices3
CRJS 2513Corrections: Systems and Practices3
CRJS 2613Court Systems and Practices3
CRJS 2713Juvenile Justice Systems3
CRJS 3623Criminal Law I3
CRJS 3823Criminal Justice Research Methods I3
CRJS 4923Criminology3
CRJS 4983Ethical Decision-Making in Criminal Justice3
Criminal Justice Electives15
Unrestricted Electives 127
Total Hours120
1

Students may use their unrestricted electives to complete a minor. The student is responsible for ensuring that all of the requirements are met. Students are advised to select minors in areas that are supportive of the criminal justice field such as psychology, human development, sociology, social work, political science, economics, or foreign language. If the minor requires less than 27 credit hours the difference should be made up in unrestricted electives. If no minor is selected, the total unrestricted electives would be 27 hours. Students are advised to select electives in areas that are supportive of the criminal justice field.

Minor in Criminal Justice

CRJS 1133Principles of Criminal Justice3
CRJS 2413Police Systems and Practices3
CRJS 2513Corrections: Systems and Practices3
CRJS 2613Court Systems and Practices3
CRJS 2713Juvenile Justice Systems3
CRJS 3623Criminal Law I3
CRJS 4923Criminology3
CRJS 4983Ethical Decision-Making in Criminal Justice3
Criminal Justice Elective3
Total Hours27

Criminal Justice with Specialization in Juvenile Justice Degree Program Requirements

Core Curriculum42
College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology Language Requirements6
Foreign Language Electives (One Language; One Sequence)
Support Area Requirements3
Select one from the following:
Elementary Statistics
Fundamental of Statistics
Social Statistics
Major Requirements for Criminal Justice with Juvenile Justice Specialization
CRJS 1133Principles of Criminal Justice3
CRJS 2413Police Systems and Practices3
CRJS 2513Corrections: Systems and Practices3
CRJS 2613Court Systems and Practices3
CRJS 2713Juvenile Justice Systems3
CRJS 2723Theories and Development of Juvenile Gangs3
CRJS 2743Law of Juvenile Justice3
CRJS 3623Criminal Law I3
CRJS 3733Juvenile Probation and Parole3
CRJS 3823Criminal Justice Research Methods I3
CRJS 4923Criminology3
CRJS 4983Ethical Decision-Making in Criminal Justice3
Two Criminal Justice Electives6
Unrestricted electives 127
Total Hours120
1

Students may use their unrestricted electives to complete a minor.  The student is responsible for ensuring that all of the requirements are met.  Students are advised to select minors in areas that are supportive of the criminal justice field such as psychology, human development, sociology, social work, political science, economics or foreign language.  If the minor requires less than 27 credit hours the difference should be made up in unrestricted electives.  If no minor is selected, the total unrestricted electives would be 27 hours.  Students are advised to select electives in areas that are supportive of the criminal justice field. 

Admission Requirements

In addition to the general admission requirements to the Graduate School described elsewhere in the catalog, students seeking admission to the M.S. degrees in juvenile justice and juvenile forensic psychology should meet the following requirements:

  • A baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university;
  • A minimum GPA of 2.75 with a GPA of 3.0 or higher preferred;
  • Three signed letters of recommendation from persons in the field of the applicant’s academic major or area of concentration.  At least two of the letters must be from professors with personal knowledge of the candidate’s skills and potential for master’s work.  Each letter must be printed on letterhead of the writer's agency or higher education institution of employment;
  • Official scores on the general component of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) which consists of verbal, analytical and quantitative scores. An unofficial copy may be used by the Master’s Admission Committee in initial screening;
  • Completion of liberal arts courses at the undergraduate level such as social sciences, behavioral sciences, college algebra, and statistics;
  • Completion of a 1000 word essay detailing the applicant’s reasons for pursuing the degree; and
  • Original transcripts for all academic work taken at the undergraduate level.
  • International students from a non-English speaking country must submit official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) unless the student has a degree from an U.S.A. institution of higher education.

Program areas may establish additional admission requirements, for example required prerequisites for Juvenile Forensic Psychology are General Psychology, Personality, Abnormal Psychology, Statistics, Developmental and Research Methods.

Master of Science in Juvenile Justice Program Information

The Master of Science degree program in Juvenile Justice offers a curriculum that enables students to critically evaluate and confront the humanistic, technical, and scientific aspects of criminal justice as applicable to juvenile crime and delinquency. This program is web based.

The primary objectives of the Master of Science degree in Juvenile Justice are to:

  • Enhance students’ knowledge, skills, and resourcefulness related to detained and institutionalized juveniles in the juvenile justice system;
  • Increase students’ knowledge of theoretical explanations and the etiologies of delinquency and juvenile crime;
  • Assure that students engage in the humanistic, technical, and scientific aspects of delinquency and juvenile crime;
  • Increase students’ knowledge concerning effective methods to intervene and prevent delinquency;
  • Increase students’ skills in how to conduct research and evaluate programs related to delinquency; and
  • Expand students’ knowledge of programs and policies related to delinquency.

Since there are no comparable degree programs in the nation, graduates will have a unique opportunity to acquire specialized skills and competencies that should positively impact the lives of troubled youth across the state of Texas.

The MSJJ Program requires the completion of 36 semester credit hours. Two options are available for students: thesis and non-thesis. Students opting for the thesis curriculum must successfully complete 30 hours of course work in addition to 6 hours of thesis. The non-thesis option requires the successful completion of 36 hours of course work and passing a comprehensive examination. This program is web-based. Students may take six credit hours during eight week sessions, 8A and 8B for the fall and spring semesters.  During the summer five week sessions a student may take six credit hours for summer I and for summer Il  towards  completing the degree in one year.

Transfer of Graduate Courses from Other Universities

A maximum of six (6) credits of juvenile-justice related graduate coursework may be transferred from other accredited universities. A minimum grade of “B” is required in any such courses. The transferred class must be equivalent to a course not previously taken, from the list of courses offered in the MSJJ degree program. Students should follow the process described below. Transfer course work will not be considered that will be more than six (6) years old at the time the MSJJ degree from the College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology is awarded. It is suggested that students gain transfer approval from their advisor, the Department Head, and the Dean’s office before taking the proposed transfer course. The following procedure is recommended.

  1. The student gathers information/credentials about the course. Each desired transfer course must be from a regionally accredited graduate program. Information and credentials include; syllabus, course description in the catalog of the university in which the class was taken (or will be taken), or a letter from the professor stating the subject matter covered in the class. The more information provided the better.
  2. The student provides his/her advisor with the information. The advisor reviews the information for adequacy. If the advisor concludes that enough information has not been gathered, the student is told what information is needed. If the class(es) is/are transferable in the opinion of the advisor, a university transfer form is completed by the advisor and forwarded to the Department Head for consideration by the Dean’s office. The transfer form states why the course should or should not be transferred. If the advisor thinks that the course is not transferable, the student may write a letter of appeal to the Department Head.
  3. The Department Head will verify the transferability of the course and recommend approval or disapproval. If disapproved, the student may appeal to the Office of the Dean of the College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology.
  4. To transfer courses from the MSJFP program to the MSJJ, please refer to the MSJJ handbook.

Continuous Enrollment and Leave of Absence

Students in the MSJJ program who have not completed their formal course requirements are expected to enroll continuously in the program during all consecutive long semesters after initial registration. Students who do not expect to be enrolled, should notify the Department Head in writing.

During a leave of absence, a student cannot make use of the University or College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology resources, nor attempt comprehensive examination nor defend a thesis.

Good Academic Standing

Students remain in good standing when they maintain a minimum graduate GPA of 3.0 for graded coursework. An average of “B” must be maintained by the student in all graduate coursework. While one grade of “C” may be counted towards the MS degree, only grades of “B” or better (and 3.00 GPA) indicate satisfactory completion of requirements for the degree. Only grades earned in or approved by the College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology will be used to calculate a student’s GPA. If a student receives a total of two grades of “C” in any combination of courses (required/elective), his/her graduate status is reviewed by a committee of the graduate faculty. The committee will consider the advisability of continued enrollment in the program, termination or remedial work, i.e. repeat course(s). If the student receives three grades of “C”, his/her enrollment as a graduate student is automatically terminated. Obtaining grades higher than “C” in a repeated course does not remove the original two “C” grades and will be counted against the student toward the three “C” limit. If the student receives a grade of “D” or F” in any course, he/she is automatically dismissed from the program. In any of the above scenarios, the student may petition the graduate committee for readmission. The above requirements apply to all courses taken while enrolled in the program.

Time Limit

A student must complete all requirements for the MSJJ degree within six (6) consecutive calendar years after the first date of enrollment. Any exception must be petitioned to the Head of Department, the Dean of the College and the Dean of the Graduate School.

Comprehensive Examination

Comprehensive examinations in the MSJJ program are an elective option for those students who choose not to complete a thesis. These examinations are employed to test the student’s general knowledge and his/her ability to integrate and synthesize the wealth of information in the field. Comprehensive exams are offered three times a year which includes fall, spring and summer semesters.

Financial Aid

The University offers various forms of financial aid, from scholarships to work-student arrangements and loans. Scholarships are usually in very short supply. Those interested in financial aid are encouraged to visit the Financial Aid website.

Degree Program Requirements

Required Courses
JJUS 5123Foundations of Juvenile Justice3
JJUS 5763Theories of Delinquency3
JJUS 5943Research Methods 13
JJUS 5963Applied Statistical Methods and Computing 1,23
Other Requirements24
Select Comprehensive or Thesis option below
Total Hours36
Comprehensive Examination Option
Select eight classes from the following:24
Foundations of Criminal Justice
Substance Abuse
Community Structure and Problems
Community Building and Organizing
Domestic and Family Violence
Economic Life and Juvenile Crime
Conflict Mediation/Resolution
Correctional Programming
Management of Juvenile Justice Organizations
Ethics
Special Topics in Juvenile Justice
Policy Analysis and Progam Evaluation
Total Hours24
Thesis Option
JJUS 5986Thesis6
Select six classes from the following:18
Foundations of Criminal Justice
Substance Abuse
Community Structure and Problems
Community Building and Organizing
Domestic and Family Violence
Economic Life and Juvenile Crime
Conflict Mediation/Resolution
Correctional Programming
Management of Juvenile Justice Organizations
Ethics
Special Topics in Juvenile Justice
Policy Analysis and Progam Evaluation
Total Hours24
1

Cross-listed courses

2

Student must complete JJUS 5963 Applied Statistics Methods & Computing within the first twelve hours of coursework.

 Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Juvenile Justice Program Information

The goal of the Ph.D. program is to provide doctoral training in juvenile justice research. General objectives include the development of new knowledge, juvenile delinquency prevention, improvement in the juvenile justice system, and dissemination of knowledge gained. The specific intent of the program is to produce scholars with three characteristics: First, graduates will have superior empirical skills. Second, they will be specialists in the subject matter of the juvenile justice discipline. Third, they will be generalists in the subject matter of criminal justice. The program produces scholars to teach in criminal justice and criminology departments in colleges and universities and researchers to work in federal, state, and large local agencies.

Admission Requirements

Admission criteria for the Ph.D. Program in Juvenile Justice, as established by the Program faculty, are as follows:

Required elements: (In order for an application to be considered, all elements below must be present in the applicant’s file by the application deadline.)

  • Baccalaureate degree conferred by a regionally accredited institution;
  • Master’s degree, prior to entering doctoral course work, conferred by a regionally accredited institution;
  • Official scores on the general component of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) which consists of verbal, analytical and quantitative scores. An unofficial copy may be used by the Doctoral Admission Committee in initial screening. An application without GRE scores will not be reviewed;
  • Original transcripts for all academic work taken at the undergraduate and graduate levels (unofficial copies may be used by the Doctoral Admission Committee in initial screening);
  • Three signed letters of recommendation on letterhead from professors with personal knowledge of the candidate’s skills and potential for doctoral work;

  • Original 1000 word essay as described in the doctoral application form and a copy of the master’s thesis or other lengthy report or paper; and

  • International students from a non-English speaking country  must submit official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) unless the student has a degree from an U.S.A. institution of higher education. A score of 550 or higher is mandatory.

Preferences:

  • Baccalaureate degree in juvenile justice, criminal justice, or criminology. A secondary preference is a directly related social science discipline (such as sociology) in which there is evidence of the study of crime-related phenomena;
  • 3.0 Grade Point Average (GPA), or higher, on a four-point scale on all completed undergraduate course work;
  • Master’s degree in juvenile justice, juvenile forensic psychology, criminal justice or criminology. A secondary preference is a directly related social science discipline (such as sociology) in which there is evidence of the study of crime-related phenomena;
  • 3.5 GPA, or higher, on a four-point scale in all completed graduate course work;
  • Graduate research methods course (if not present, stem work must be completed);
  • Graduate statistics course (if not present, stem work must be completed);
  • Graduate Record Exam (GRE) verbal, quantitative and analytical scores in the higher percentiles;
  • Evidence of a successfully completed master’s thesis or published research paper;
  • 1000 word essay demonstrating strong writing skills; an expressed desire to teach at college level, work as researcher in a juvenile justice agency, and/or assist in developing juvenile justice policy within a governmental environment; realistic expectation of the degree’s value; evidence of commitment to completing the degree; strong rationale for wanting this specific Ph.D.; and a rationale expressing what the applicant will add to the field; and
  • Signed letters of recommendation on letterhead from faculty sufficiently acquainted with the student to be able to comment on the potential to successfully complete a doctoral program and demonstrate evidence of excellent critical thought, motivation, study skills, and writing skills. Preferred ratings would be primarily excellent in all categories with an overall rating in the top 3 to 10 percent of all graduate students

Enhancing qualities:

The committee will consider the following as information that will enhance an application:

  • Three or more years of paid work experience in a juvenile justice agency (law enforcement, probation/parole, or correctional institution);
  • Completion of a previous doctoral degree in any field;
  • College-level teaching experience, either as a part-time or full-time instructor;
  • Publication(s) in academic and/or scholarly outlets, with greatest emphasis on peer-reviewed publications;
  • Paid research work experience (not that involved in the production of a thesis);
  • Grant-writing experience; and
  • Ability to attend courses as a full-time student (requires less than full-time outside employment).

Interview:

In the event the initial committee decision is favorable, applicants must submit to an interview with the Doctoral Committee prior to final acceptance. That interview may be either in person or via the equivalent of a telephone conference call, depending upon the distance and hardship involved in a personal interview. The student may pass or fail the interview based on the criteria established by the faculty which will focus on professional promise and interpersonal competence. However, a positive qualifying score and interview do not automatically result in admission to the Ph.D. program.

Applicants will be admitted in one of two statuses: full graduate status or provisional status.

  1. Full graduate status is conferred on those students admitted to the program with no conditions of admission, or who have satisfied all conditions of admission.
  2. Provisional admission status is used when the Doctoral Committee perceives that prerequisites have not been met, official versions of required forms have not been received, and/or there is a question of ability to perform at doctoral standards by virtue of a failure to meet specific admissions criteria. Students who are provisionally admitted must satisfy all requirements prior to being admitted to full graduate status (conditions and requirements will be provided via letter to the student). In the event of a failure to meet prerequisites, deficiencies must be completed prior to beginning doctoral course work. No doctoral course work may be taken when there are prerequisite deficiencies nor may stem work be used to meet doctoral program requirements. Where stem work is assigned to rectify deficiencies, any grade lower than “B” will automatically result in a decision to deny admission. No more than 12 units of course work may be taken in provisional status.

It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that all conditions of admission are met in a timely fashion and to notify the Department Head when all conditions are met. Following the first semester in provisional status (non-prerequisite-deficiency cases), the Doctoral Committee will meet to consider placing the student in full graduate status. Based on the evidence at hand, the Committee may admit to full graduate status or dismiss from the program.

Students will not be accepted in courses unless they are in full graduate status or provisional status within the Juvenile Justice Doctoral Program.

Program Requirements

The program requires a minimum of 61 semester credit hours for the Ph.D. Of these hours, 43 are course work hours and 18 are dissertation hours. The Juvenile Justice Ph.D. Program has no tracks. There is a common core and students may develop a specialty by structuring their choice of substantive courses, elective courses, and dissertation topic.

Courses taken during a master’s degree program may not be repeated for credit at the doctoral level.

Transfer of Graduate Courses from Other Universities

A maximum of six (6) units of juvenile-justice-related doctoral-level course work may be transferred from other accredited universities. A minimum grade of “B” is required in any such course. Transfer credit is granted by petition to, and approval by, the Doctoral Committee, with final approval by the Dean of the College. It is the student’s responsibility to initiate the petition and justify the acceptance of the course. Courses presented for transfer credit must be the equivalent of courses in the doctoral program.

Continuous Enrollment

Continuous enrollment defines the minimal level of academic activity needed to remain enrolled in the program. A Ph.D. student is considered to be continuously enrolled when he or she is enrolled for at least one course during each of the spring and fall academic semesters. Once a Ph.D. student has been admitted to candidacy he or she must enroll for a minimum of 6 hours during the 9-month academic year to be continuously enrolled. Students who fail to meet the continuous enrollment criteria will be withdrawn from the program and must apply for readmission. The sole exception is enrollment during comprehensive exams. Students taking comprehensive exams are not required to be enrolled in course work.

Residency

Students must establish course work residency before being admitted to candidacy. The residency requirement is considered to be met when a student has been continuously enrolled on campus for two consecutive semesters (excluding the summer semester).

Leave of Absence

Graduate students who have not completed their formal course requirements are expected to enroll continuously in the program during all consecutive long semesters after initial registration. Students who do not expect to be enrolled should request a leave of absence in a letter to the Department Head for Justice Studies. A leave of absence is granted at the discretion of the Dean of the College.

This provision includes students who have completed their formal course requirements and are writing the dissertation away from the campus. During a leave of absence, a student cannot make use of the University or College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology resources, nor can a student attempt comprehensive exams or defend a dissertation.

Good Standing

Ph.D. Students remain in good standing when they maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 for graded courses in the doctoral program. Only grades of “B” or better count toward required course work (i.e., all but the elective courses) and dissertation hours. Only grades earned in, or approved by the College of Juvenile Justice & Psychology doctoral level courses will be used to calculate a student’s GPA. Any grade lower than "B" in a required area course will require the student to retake the course and pass it with a grade of "B" or higher. While one elective grade of “C” may be counted toward the Ph.D., only grades of “B” or better indicate satisfactory completion of courses required for the Ph.D. If a student receives a total of two grades of “C,” in any combination of courses (elective/required), the student will be dismissed from the program, but may petition the Doctoral Committee for readmission. After reviewing the petition, the committee may allow readmission under such conditions as it deems appropriate. A third grade lower than "B" will result in permanent dismissal from the program with no recourse to petition.

Time Limit

A student must complete all requirements for the Ph.D. degree within seven (7) consecutive years after the first date of enrollment in the program. If transfer courses are permitted, the initial enrollment date of those courses must not exceed seven years prior to the date the degree is awarded.

Comprehensive Examination

Before they may be admitted to candidacy, students must successfully complete their doctoral examinations. These examinations are employed to test the student's general knowledge, his or her ability to integrate and synthesize the wealth of information in the field, and his or her preparation for engaging in the kind of independent scholarship required to complete a doctoral dissertation. Comprehensive examination are offered in the fall and spring semesters.  Students failing any portion of the comprehensive examinations must consult with the Department Head for Justice Studies to determine the steps to be taken. Two consecutive failures on any examination will result in the student's dismissal from the Ph.D. program.

Advancement to Candidacy

Following successful completion of the comprehensive examinations, it is the student's responsibility to petition for advancement to candidacy. To be advanced to candidacy, students must have completed all of the following requirements and/or procedures:

  1. Achieved a cumulative grade-point average no lower than 3.0 in program course work and a minimum grade of “B” (3.0) in all required area courses.
  2. Completed all program course work with no more than one grade lower than “B” (unless the student successfully petitions his or her dismissal and retakes a second “C” course with a grade of “B” or higher).
  3. Successfully passed all comprehensive examinations.

Following approval of the student’s application to candidacy, the student may enroll in Dissertation hours.

Students admitted to candidacy are required to accumulate a minimum of 6 credit hours during each twelve month period following admission to candidacy and until such time as the degree is granted. Further, a student must be enrolled for a minimum of 3 dissertation hours during any semester in which University resources are used. Assistantship students must continue to meet the enrollment criteria for maintaining their assistantship. Any exception to this policy requires the approval of the Head of the Department and the Dean of the College of Juvenile Justice & Psychology. Students who fail to enroll for the appropriate number of hours following advancement to candidacy shall be placed on probation. To be removed from probation, the student must enroll for the deficient number of credits plus three additional credits in the next semester. Students who do not meet these requirements will be dismissed from the doctoral program and required to reapply for admission, subject to any new admissions criteria in effect at the time of readmission.

Dissertation

Following approval of the student's application to candidacy, the student may enroll in dissertation hours. Two attempts at passing both the dissertation prospectus defense and the dissertation defense are permitted. Having met other requirements for the degree, students who successfully defend their dissertations and complete the submission process are granted the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the commencement ceremony immediately following. Failure to pass either the dissertation prospectus defense or the dissertation defense will result in the student's dismissal from the program.

The determination of completion requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Juvenile Justice is solely the province of the program faculty.

The Dissertation Committee

Students must choose a Dissertation Committee of four faculty. Three of the members are to be chosen from the faculty of the College of Juvenile Justice & Psychology, one of whom will be the chair. The Chair must be a graduate faculty member in the Justice Studies Department. A fourth committee member is chosen from faculty at Prairie View A&M University but outside the College. If special expertise is needed, the outside member may be from amongst The Texas A&M University System (TAMUS) graduate faculty. Only in the rarest of cases when expertise cannot be found at Prairie View A&M University, nor within TAMUS may students select graduate faculty from another accredited institution outside of TAMUS. This is done in consultation with the Department Head and the Chair of the student’s Advisory Committee. A letter requesting approval of the proposed committee must be forwarded to the Department Head. No committee may be constituted without the Department Head’s formal approval. The members of the committee are normally chosen for their expertise in the proposed topic or for expertise in a particular methodology. All voting members of the committee must be on the graduate faculty. Other members may be added to the committee in a non-voting status if the committee chair and the Department Head’s concur. Faculty who have not published juvenile justice or criminal justice-related materials within the past five years may only be added to the committee in a non-voting status.

Financial Assistance

The University offers various forms of financial aid, from scholarships to work-study arrangements and loans. Scholarships are usually in very short supply. Those interested in financial aid are encouraged to visit the Financial Aid website.

Pending yearly budgetary allocation, the College of Juvenile Justice & Psychology will normally have two forms of financial aid available: (1) graduate assistantships (usually requiring 20 hours of work a week) for up to 10 individuals and (2) research assistants supported by externally-funded grants. All teaching and research assistantships in excess of $1,000 carry a waiver of out-of-state tuition fees. For information on these opportunities, contact the Department Head or individual faculty in charge of various grants.

Assistantships will be competitively awarded to full-time students only. Half assistantships may also be awarded at the discretion of the Doctoral Committee and the Dean. All full-time applicants admitted to the program should apply to be considered for assistantships by the Doctoral Committee. These assistantships will normally be awarded for a period of one academic year (nine months) and may be renewed for a second year (nine months). For newly admitted doctoral students who show exceptional potential to successfully complete the program, the doctoral committee might make a recommendation that the assistantship be extended for a third year. The students recommended for third year assistantships must demonstrate evidence of excellence in the following areas: excellent research and writing skills, excellent commitment to the discipline, excellent critical thought, exceptional personal commitment and motivation to complete the degree, evidence of overall strong faculty recommendation rating the student as top 3% or top 5% of all currently enrolled doctoral students. Assignments most likely will include teaching and/or teaching support, research/research support, and/or editorial duties.

Award criteria for assistantships are similar to admission criteria. Those who are admitted under full-time status will be ranked by the Committee based on their Graduate GPA, GRE scores, and additional evidence of preparation for the discipline (see Doctoral Policy 3 for specific details). Third year assistantships will include the above criteria and other criteria the faculty deems appropriate. Other forms of award other than student loans also will be taken into consideration in the awarding of assistantships. The Committee will award assistantships based on ranking and the available number of assistantships.

In order to maintain an assistantship the following are necessary:

  • Continuing full-time enrollment (9–12 hours)
  • Doctoral Grade Point Average above “B”
  • Satisfactory evaluation by the supervising professor
  • Satisfactory progress evaluation by the Doctoral Committee
  • Indications of professional potential such as teaching and research

In the event of a failure to meet one of these areas, the Doctoral Committee may decide to continue the assistantship, predicated on the student’s acceptance of appropriate remedial activity.

If a student receiving compensation for an assistantship of 20 hours a week decides to seek either full-time or part-time employment elsewhere, that fact shall be made known in writing to the Doctoral Coordinator. In general, full-time employment constitutes grounds for automatic termination of assistantship and/or scholarship awards. Part-time employment will be considered on an individual basis, but normally will be discouraged.

Degree Program Requirements

Prerequisite Courses
Necessary for admission, not counted in program hours
JJUS 5123Foundations of Juvenile Justice3
JJUS 5763Theories of Delinquency3
JJUS 5943Research Methods3
JJUS 5963Applied Statistical Methods and Computing3
Total Hours12
Required Support Courses
JJUS 7661Juvenile Justice Statistics Lab1
JJUS 7943Advanced Research Methods I3
JJUS 7953Advanced Research Methods II3
JJUS 7963Advanced Statistical Techniques I3
JJUS 7973Advanced Statistical Techniques II3
Required Substantive Courses in Juvenile Justice
JJUS 7113Juv Just Issu Pract3
select 6 additional credit hours from the list of courses below: 6
Seminar on Juvenile Corrections 1
Philosophy of Punishment 1
Demographics and Juvenile Justice 1
Seminar on Juvenile Processing by Police and Courts 1
Legal Aspects of Juvenile Justice 1
Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation 1
Required Delinquency Theory Courses
JJUS 7673The Juvenile Offender and Youth Gangs3
JJUS 7773Theories of Crime and Delinquency3
JJUS 7873Advanced Seminar in Crime and Delinquency Theory3
Elective Courses
Select four of the following:12
Seminar in Grant Writing
Management and Administration
Seminar on Juvenile Corrections 1
Philosophy of Punishment 1
Qualitative Methods in Social Sciences
JJUS 7713 Special Topics in Juvenile Justice
Demographics and Juvenile Justice 1
Seminar on Juvenile Processing by Police and Courts 1
Legal Aspects of Juvenile Justice 1
Prevention and Treatment of Crime and Delinquency
Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation
Dissertation - total dissertation hours18
Dissertation I
Dissertation II
Dissertation III
Dissertation IV
Total Hours61
1

These courses can be used in either Substantive Courses in Juvenile Justice or as an elective course.

Caution:  course is usable in two areas, Juvenile Justice and Electives.  Be sure you do not place a course in more than one area and watch expected course scheduling to determine which areas you should fill first. 

Honor Societies, Clubs and Service Organizations

Alpha Phi Sigma - National Honor Society in Criminal Justice . The Honor Society was created to recognize scholarship among students of Criminal Justice and provide them with opportunities to attend various conferences sponsored by the national organization. Students are also provided information about opportunities in careers in Criminal Justice as well as educational opportunities in graduate and professional schools.

National Association of Blacks in Criminal Justice - Student Division . This is a national organization of Criminal Justice Professionals who provide its members with current information about the field of Criminal Justice. The Prairie View Chapter provides its members with opportunities to attend various conferences sponsored by the national organization and regional chapters. Students also have access to career counseling and information about career opportunities with various federal, state, and local agencies.

The Criminal Justice Club . This organization is open to any student majoring or minoring in Criminal Justice at this institution. The primary purpose of the organization is to provide its members with information about career opportunities and graduate and professional educational opportunities in the field. They also provide a forum for various recruiters to speak to its members and they also take field trips to area criminal justice agencies to observe and speak with professionals.

Homeland Security/ Emergency Management Certificate (12 credits)
 

The Undergraduate Certificate can be taken independently of other degree programs or, as part of a degree program and does not require full enrollment in the university.  All students in the certificate program receive full Prairie View A&M University course credit that can later be applied toward a degree.

This program is designed to introduce students to the homeland security enterprise and emergency management. Students will learn about the creation of the Department of Homeland Security, its goals and the knowledge and skills necessary for effective emergency management. Students will have the opportunity to select electives to complete the program that will allow them to explore homeland security and emergency management within their major or other focus area. Students must take at least one upper level course to complete the certificate. A project that brings the relevant knowledge together is required to complete the program. This certificate program addresses the workforce need for diversity in homeland security and emergency management by exposing students to these two career areas. It is also designed to serve the land grant mission of the university by responding to community needs with particular attention to rural communities.

OBJECTIVES

  • To have awareness of the varied aspects of work in homeland security
  • To have awareness of the nature of work in emergency management
  • To understand the applicability of homeland security and emergency management to the student’s major or focus area
  • To be able to contribute to efficacious homeland security and emergency management operations

The certificate includes six credits of required courses, six hours of electives courses from the options indicated and, a social responsibility (civic engagement) project. The project may be completed in conjunction with any of the courses for the certificate as pre-approved by the certificate administrator in the College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology. Pre-approval of the electives will require a review of the syllabus to be used for relevant content. Typically, the required project will begin during enrollment in CRJS 2483 but may not be completed until the final course is taken for the certificate. The project must have real world applicability. As such, it will be completed with consultation involving relevant persons in the targeted community, government, business or private entity. This effort might be coordinated with assistance from the university’s Office of Student Affairs (therein, the service learning/volunteer coordination office), and, or Texas A&M University – College Station.  A typical project would be the creation of a disaster response plan, a disaster mitigation plan, a homeland security research paper or participation in a day long simulation exercise with a paper requirement.

REQUIRED

CRJS 2443 Introduction to Homeland Security (required)

CRJS 2483 Introduction to Emergency Management (required)

CRJS 2483 Introduction to Emergency Management 3 SCH This course presents the theories, principles, and approaches to managing both natural and man-made emergencies. The philosophy of Comprehensive Emergency Management will be discussed with the four attendant steps which include mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. An analysis of past disasters will be presented along with their impacts on policy formation leading up to the current FEMA all-hazards approach.  The role, duties, and importance of the Emergency Manager will be discussed.  Finally, legal issues involving emergency management will be presented.

CRJS 2443 Introduction to Homeland Security: 3 SCH The course will introduce students to the history of the Department of Homeland Security as a federal entity and homeland security as an area of study in the United States. It will include major research and theoretical perspectives that have resulted in significant initiatives to keep persons in the United States safe from various threats.

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Electives *(at least one course must be an upper level course):

Recommended for Psychology Majors

PSYC 2513 Personality: 3 semester hours.

Personality theories, major concepts, methods and problems in the field of psychology. Analysis of theories of personality, with emphasis on personality development in the normal population. Evaluation of theories in the field of psychology. The development of personality as a pattern of strivings manifested in interpersonal relations. The coverage of constitutional, psychological, social and cultural factors in the development and adjustment of the normal individual. **(PSYC 2316)**Transfer equivalent from Texas Community/Junior Colleges

PSYC 3713 Psychology of Terrorism

This course is designed to assist students in becoming more aware of factors that may contribute to the development of terroristic attitudes and behaviors. Students will learn how to define terrorism and distinguish different kinds of terroristic groups, which include juvenile terrorist groups, racial supremacists groups, and foreign terrorist groups. Students will learn about environmental, cultural, familial factors related to terroristic activity.

Recommended for Criminal Justice Majors

CRJS 2113 Intro Geog Info Sys: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the fundamentals of Geographic Information System (GIS) and science and art of making maps. The course introduces students to the basic principles of using GIS as tool for managing and analyzing spatial data.

CRJS 2453 Introduction to Terrorism: 3 semester hours.

The study of the history and development of terrorism the various types of terrorism, including narcoterrorism, religious terrorism, state-sponsored terrorism and domestic terrorism. Emphasis will be placed on counter-terrorism program

CRJS 2813 Computer Applications in Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the interface necessary for functioning effectively in various areas of criminal justice. The course also examines how the use of computers and related technology has changed the process of maintaining law and order nationally and internationally. It includes a review of social engineering techniques (ways that people might enhance personal and institutional security) and the field of computer forensics

CRJS 3463 Transnational Crimes: 3 semester hours.

The study of criminal behavior that transcends traditional national boundaries. The course will focus on the origins of these types of crimes and the efforts of law enforcement to address them. Cyber-terrorism, cyber-crimes, human trafficking, drug trafficking and patrimonial crimes will be reviewed

CRJS 3673 International and Federal Criminal Law: 3 semester hours.

The study of the origin purpose of international laws related to homeland security and terrorism and federal criminal law including crimes against persons, property crimes, principles, defenses and a comparison with state criminal law including the Texas Penal Code

CRJS 4323 Criminal Justice Management Principles: 3 semester hours.

A study of basic criminal justice management theories and contemporary practices. This includes an examination of the unique behaviors, social skills and organizational techniques necessary for the criminal justice professional to be successful in various settings. Special attention is given to relating effectively with superiors, colleagues, subordinates and various members of the public impacted by criminal justice agencies

CRJS 4416 Undergraduate Internship in Criminal Justice: 6 semester hours.

A student may be required to satisfactorily complete a minimum of three month's internship in an approved criminal justice setting preferably between the junior and senior year. This internship program is specifically designed to acquaint the student with practical aspects of criminal justice

Recommended for Chemistry Majors

CHEM 1042 General Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory: 2 semester hours.

For students majoring or minoring in chemistry. A continuation of CHEM 1032. General laboratory course covering aspects of volumetric, gravimetric and qualitative analyses; determination of chemical and physical properties, and chemical synthesis. Prerequisite: MATH 1113, Co-requisite: CHEM 1043

CHEM 1043 General Inorganic Chemistry: 3 semester hours.

For students majoring or minoring in chemistry. A continuation of CHEM 1033. Bonding theory and molecular structure, intermolecular forces properties of solutions, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-based equilibria, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry and introduction to organic chemistry. Prerequisites: MATH 1113, CHEM 1033. ** (CHEM 1412) **Transfer equivalent from Texas Community/Junior Colleges

CHEM 2043 General Organic Chemistry II: 3 semester hours.

For chemistry majors and minors, chemical engineering, and science majors. A continuation of CHEM 2033. Substitution and elimination reactions, spectroscopic identification of organic compounds, reactions of substituted benzenes, reactions of carbonyl compounds, bioorganic compounds and special topics in organic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 2033

CHEM 3023 Special Topics in Chemistry w/revolving themes forensic science/emerging areas of interests in Chem: 3 semester hours.

Special Topics in Chemistry with revolving themes around forensic science and emerging areas of interests in Chemistry and Technology. Prerequisite: CHEM 2043 or Departmental approval

Recommended for Engineering Majors

COMP 1013 Introduction to Computer Science: 3 semester hours.

Fundamentals of computer science and programming to include algorithm definition, concepts, semantics and logic, fundamental data types (character, integer, and floating-point) and their binary representations and limits, arithmetic and logical operators and precedence, program structure and flow, branching and looping, functions and parameters, and basic input and output methods, emphasizing modular design and implementation of an object-oriented language such as C++

COMP 4123 Computer Networks: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the networking of computer systems to include the study of local area (LAN) and wide area (W AN) networks, data transmission, communications software, the architecture of networks, and network communication protocols. Prerequisite: COMP 3063

CVEG 3043 Environmental Engineering: 3 semester hours.

Review of the environmental chemistry and biology, introduction to environmental science and engineering, material balance, reaction kinetics, reactor design, introduction to solid and hazardous waste, water and wastewater quality characteristics, laboratory analysis of water and wastewater samples. Prerequisites: CHEM 1021, CHEM 1034 and MCEG 2013

Recommended for Business (and related) Majors

MISY 2013 Fundamentals of MIS: 3 semester hours.

The course provides a solid foundation in MIS concepts and theory and gives exposure to current technologies being used in business today. The emphasis is on understanding how information systems are used by managers and professionals to improve organizational performance, teamwork, and productivity. Topics covered include telecommunication, networking, enterprise systems, IT security, and emerging technologies. Prerequisite: MISY 1013 or equivalent

MISY 4452: Special Topics in MIS: 3 semester credit hours.

Topics include network/cyber attacks and defense, system threats and risk. Identifying the threats against network infrastructures and building defensible networks that minimize the impact of attacks; tools that can be used to analyze a network to both prevent and detect the adversary; decode and analyze packets using various tools to identify anomalies and improve network defenses; perform penetration testing against an organization to determine vulnerabilities and points of compromise; creating and running incident handling capability; tools to identify and remediate malware across organizations; data classification program used to deploy data loss prevention solutions at both host and network level; disaster recovery and policy implementation.

Recommended for Management Majors

MGMT 1013 Introduction to Business: 3 semester hours.

An overview of business operations and the role of business in modem society. Topics of current interest to the business community will be introduced

MGMT 3103 Principles of Management: 3 semester hours.

Fundamentals of organization and administration. Planning, organizing, directing, coordinating, and controlling business activities. Goal setting: models for thinking about organizations; organizational design; information systems; models for understanding individual behavior; job performance and job satisfaction; motivation and leadership; behavior in work groups and careers in business. Prerequisite: MGMT 1013, and junior/senior classification

Recommended for Political Science Majors

POSC 2123 Public Administration: 3 semester hours.

This course provides an examination of the organization, responsibility, personnel management, fiscal processes, functions, and problems of public administration. ** (GOVT 2335) **Transfer equivalent from Texas Community/Junior Colleges

POSC 2503 Global Issues: 3 semester hours.

Selected issues facing the global community are examined. Issues include hunger, energy, population, war and racism. The course has interdisciplinary and cross-cultural focus

POSC 2543 State and Local Government: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of state and local governments in the federal system; encompasses an examination of the state and local politics in the United States with an emphasis on politics and public policy

POSC 3513 Comparative Politics: 3 semester hours.

Examines the dynamics of Comparative Politics from the perspective of globalization characterized by the world's increasing interconnectedness, particularly in regards to politics, economics, communication and cultures. Provides a comprehensive analysis of nations encompassing histories, societies, politics and economics. Examines contemporary nations in the context of current trends, including modernization, democracy, the environment, human rights, terrorism, security and globalization. Explores symbolic countries in case studies

POSC 3523 Comparative Politics of Developing States: 3 semester hours.

The course examines political processes in the developing nations of Africa, Asia, and Latin America, with particular attention to the problems of political integration and nation building

POSC 3533 U.S. Foreign Policy: 3 semester hours.

This is a study of the American foreign policy, including the objectives, capabilities and formulation process

POSC 3543 International Politics: 3 semester hours.

The basic problems of international politics, focusing on the power competition among states and other transnational institutions, are the major focus of this course. (Required for all majors and minors)

POSC 3553 African Politics: 3 semester hours.

This is an introductory course in the political history and development of African states

POSC 3593 Middle East Politics: 3 semester hours.

This course makes a comprehensive study of the major issues and dilemmas in contemporary Middle Eastern politics, including the clash of religions and nationalisms, security and stability in the Persian Gulf, the Arab-Israeli conflict, efforts at democratization, and the role of women

POSC 4103 Urban Government and Politics: 3 semester hours.

This course examines the structure and functions of urban government. Considerable attention is given to the politics and current problems of metropolitan areas

For Social Work Majors

SOWK 2133 Social Work with Children and Families: 3 semester hours.

Examination of social and cultural constructs of childhood including history and development of child welfare services; childhood developmental stages; social policy relevant to children, families and their well-being; assessment, intervention and direct services for children and families

SOWK 2173 Multicultural Issues in Mental Health: 3 semester hours.

Exploration of the etiology and treatment modalities for addressing mental health issues with culturally diverse populations including African American, Hispanic American, and Asian American

SOWK 3213 Human and Cultural Diversity Social Work: 3 semester hours.

Acquisition and application of methods, theories, and skills sensitive to a wide variety of human differences for competent social work practice with diverse populations. Effects of prejudice, discrimination, and stereotyping at individual and institutional levels. Advocacy for social and economic justice specific to race, ethnicity, gender, age, religion, disability, social class, nationality, and sexual orientation

SOWK 4176 Field Practicum: 6 semester hours.

Supervised learning experience involving field-based placement in social service agency. Integration of theory and practice. All required social work foundation courses must be completed before entering practicum. Co-requisite: SOWK 4183

SOWK 4343 Generalist Crisis Intervention: 3 semester hours.

Intervention with individuals, families, and communities in crisis using the generalist social work model. Crisis assessment, management and referral

For any major

GEOG/CRJS 2113 Introduction to Geographic Information System: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the fundamentals of Geographic Information System (GIS) and science and art of making maps. The course introduces students to the basic principles of using GIS as tool for managing and analyzing spatial data

GEOG 2633 Cultural Geography: 3 semester hours.

Economic, social, and political adjustments that man makes to various habitats and to natural environment factors

GEOG 3733 Political Geography: 3 semester hours.

This course examines the influence which the natural environment has on the evolution of cultures, the establishment of political boundaries and political systems and on the nature of international trade and politics

Recommended for Business Majors (* at least one upper level course below)

ECON 2123 Principles of Macroeconomics: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of the principles and problems of money and banking, national income, public finance, international trade, and economic growth. **(ECON 2301) ** Transfer equivalent from Texas Community/Junior Colleges

ECON 2113 Principles of Microeconomics: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of the principles and problems of production and distribution, market structure, business enterprise, and comparative economic systems. **(ECON 2302) Prerequisite: Pass all sections of THEA. ** Transfer equivalent from Texas Community/Junior Colleges

ECON 4343 International Trade: 3 semester hours.

Principles and practices of foreign trade with special emphasis on international economic relations. Analysis of foreign exchange, balance of payments, foreign investment, tariff history and policy, and currency problems. Prerequisite: ECON 2123, ECON 2113 and junior/senior classification

FINA 4303 Money and Banking: 3 semester hours.

Covers a wide spectrum of topics and issues in banking and finance, including the role and nature of money in the economy, bank management, technological innovations and the practice of banking, creation and regulation of the money supply and the institutions involved, monetary policies and the role of the Federal Reserve and Treasury Department. Prerequisite: ECON 2123 and junior/senior classification. Cross-listed as ECON 4303

Recommended for Food Science students

GEOG/CRJS 2113 Introduction to Geographic Information System: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the fundamentals of Geographic Information System (GIS) and science and art of making maps. The course introduces students to the basic principles of using GIS as tool for managing and analyzing spatial data

FDSC 3583 Food Quality Assurance and Sanitation: 3 semester hours.

Examination of the elements of a comprehensive quality assurance program. Areas of study include sanitation, pest control, waste disposal, food law regulations, sensory testing, panel selection and training, and experimental design and analysis of data. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Laboratory fee: $15.00

FDSC 3593 Food Bacteriology: 3 semester hours.

Microbiology of human foods and accessory substances. Raw and processed foods, physical, chemical and biological phases of spoilage. Standard industry techniques of inspection and control. Laboratory fee: $15.00

Recommended for Nursing Majors

NURS 4173 Community Health Nursing: 3 semester hours.

This theory course focuses on the synthesis of public health concepts within a preventive framework to promote and maintain the health of communities. The nursing process is used in community assessment, risk identification and application of community health nursing strategies. Prerequisite: NURS 3004, NURS 4163, NURS 4183. Co-requisite: NURS 4272

NURS 4323 Introduction to Disaster/Emergency Preparedness and Response: 3 semester hours.

This course provides a foundation in the principles of disaster planning and management from a disaster team perspective. The roles of different members of the disaster team are examined with a focus on the role of the nurse. Various classifications of disasters, including natural and human-made disasters, are identified and defined and various biological, chemical and nuclear agents are discussed. Nursing care of physical injuries and psychological/behavior manifestations of disaster victims and workers involved in natural and man-made disasters are highlighted. Consent of Instructor. Elective.

Courses

CRJS 1111 Introductory Seminar in Criminal and Juvenile Justice: 1 semester hour.

An overview of the professional opportunities available in criminal justice, juvenile justice and related fields. Students will be introduced to the importance of professional relationship building, the value of internships, and the myriad professional job opportunities available in both juvenile and criminal justice.

CRJS 1123 Crime in America: 3 semester hours.

The course requires that students critically examine and analyze crime issues and trends in America. It includes presentations from active practitioners and researchers in the field of criminal justice on the current state of crime in America and an examination of offenders' rationale for crime. Students will express their ideas effectively through written, oral or visual means. They will compare emperical and quantitative data on typologies of crime, offenders and victims in America. The course addresses cultural and subcultural influences on crime, civic responsibility and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national and global communities toward crime prevention.

CRJS 1133 Principles of Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

Inquiry and evaluation of the principles, philosophy and history of criminal justice including the constitutional restraints imposed on criminal justice officials. Emphasis will be on the criminal justice officials' role in the prevention and control of crime and delinquency. Requires effective written, oral and visual expression of ideas. Students will compare emperical and quantitative data on typologies of crime, offenders and victims in America. The course addresses cultural and sub-cultural influences on crime, justice, civic responsibility and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national and global communities to understand crime and crime prevention.

CRJS 2113 Intro Geog Info Sys: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the fundamentals of Geographic Information System (GIS) and science and art of making maps. The course introduces students to the basic principles of using GIS as tool for managing and analyzing spatial data.

CRJS 2413 Police Systems and Practices: 3 semester hours.

A study of the structural aspects and principles of personnel management, program development, fiscal management, and other major components of police organization.

CRJS 2423 Introduction to Criminal Investigation and Identification: 3 semester hours.

A survey of scientific crime detection methods, the identification and presentation of evidence. Instrumentation, and crime report writing.

CRJS 2433 Police Community Relations: 3 semester hours.

An examination of various aspects of police- community relations. It includes the effects of various forms of policing styles on community dynamics, misperceptions and bias on the part of both communities and the police. Other topics include civil rights and civil liberties as they relate to law enforcement policy.

CRJS 2443 Introduction to Homeland Security: 3 semester hours.

The course will introduce students to the history of the Department of Homeland Security as a federal entity and homeland security as an area of study in the United States. It will include major research and theoretical perspectives that have resulted in significant initiatives to keep persons in the United States safe from various threats.

CRJS 2453 Introduction to Terrorism: 3 semester hours.

The study of the history and development of terrorism the various types of terrorism, including narcoterrorism, religious terrorism, state-sponsored terrorism and domestic terrorism. Emphasis will be placed on counter-terrorism program.

CRJS 2483 Introduction to Emergency Management: 3 semester hours.

This course presents the theories, principles, and approaches to managing both natural and man-made emergencies. The philosophy of Comprehensive Emergency Management will be discussed with the four attendant steps which include mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. An anlaysis of past disasters will be presented along with their impacts on policy formation leading up to the current FEMA all-hazards approach. The role, duties, an importance of the Emergency Manager will be discussed. Finally, legal issues involving emergency management will be presented.

CRJS 2513 Corrections: Systems and Practices: 3 semester hours.

An examination of the organization, administration and management of correctional facilities and programs in the United States. It includes a study of the populations served, sentencing structures and their outcomes for the individuals, families and communities involved.

CRJS 2523 Alternatives to Incarceration: 3 semester hours.

An examination of various correctional alternatives to incarceration including probation, parole, developments in the technological monitoring of offenders, and community-based reintegration and rehabilitation efforts.

CRJS 2613 Court Systems and Practices: 3 semester hours.

The legal procedures for arrest, complaint, presentation before the magistrate, grand jury consideration, indictment or waiver, arraignment, and the admissibility of evidence on these issues; pretrial matters, post-verdict motions, sentencing, and appeal.

CRJS 2643 Criminal Procedure: 3 semester hours.

An examination of the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Amendments regarding search and seizure, warrant requirements, the right to counsel, confessions, and the admissibility of evidence.

CRJS 2663 Evidence Law: 3 semester hours.

A study of Evidence Law with an emphasis on burden of proof, relevance, judicial notices, real and demonstrative evidence (including documents), the Hearsay Rule and its exceptions, privileges, unlawfully obtained evidence, and presumptions of guilt and innocence.

CRJS 2713 Juvenile Justice Systems: 3 semester hours.

An overview of the Juvenile Justice System including research and theoretical perspectives. It includes an in-depth study of the system and early decision-making process with focus on the police, the juvenile courts and the limits on juvenile sanctions. Community-based corrections with a historical perspective on juvenile probation and juvenile aftercare are also examined. A thorough working knowledge of institutionalization in terms of the treatment of juvenile offenders is provided.

CRJS 2723 Theories and Development of Juvenile Gangs: 3 semester hours.

This course is a comprehensive, in-depth coverage of historical and contemporary reactions to juvenile gangs. Among the key areas to be covered will be the legal and social definitions of juvenile delinquency, the theories, the social context, and the institutional responses. An understanding of public policy and its impact on juvenile gangs will complete the course.

CRJS 2743 Law of Juvenile Justice: 3 semester hours.

The course offers an examination of both substantive and procedural laws related to juvenile justice including criminal law, criminal procedure, evidence, and family codes. The course also examines the institutions that enforce these laws and the principal actors involved. Finally, the course examines current trends and projections in juvenile justice.

CRJS 2813 Computer Applications in Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the interface necessary for functioning effectively in various areas of criminal justice. The course also examines how the use of computers and related technology has changed the process of maintaining law and order nationally and internationally. It includes a review of social engineering techniques (ways that people might enhance personal and institutional security) and the field of computer forensics.

CRJS 3313 Policy Analysis: Prevention and Control: 3 semester hours.

A systematic examination of various crime control efforts involving primary and secondary prevention and the implementation of treatment programs.

CRJS 3463 Transnational Crimes: 3 semester hours.

The study of criminal behavior that transcends traditional national boundaries. The course will focus on the origins of these types of crimes and the efforts of law enforcement to address them. Cyber-terrorism, cyber-crimes, human trafficking, drug trafficking and patrimonial crimes will be reviewed.

CRJS 3623 Criminal Law I: 3 semester hours.

A study of basic principles of substantive criminal law which include definitions of crimes against persons. Emphasis is on the Texas Penal Code as it pertains to murder, capital murder, voluntary homicide, criminal negligence, homicide, and sexual offenses.

CRJS 3633 Criminal Law II: 3 semester hours.

A study of the basic principles of substantive criminal law which includes definitions of crime against property. Emphasis is on the Texas Penal Code related to arson, robbery, burglary, theft, forgery, embezzlement, and false pretense.

CRJS 3673 International and Federal Criminal Law: 3 semester hours.

The study of the origin purpose of international laws related to homeland security and terrorism and federal criminal law including crimes against persons, property crimes, principles, defenses and a comparison with state criminal law including the Texas Penal Code.

CRJS 3733 Juvenile Probation and Parole: 3 semester hours.

A survey and analysis of juvenile probation aftercare. The course addresses the history and legal aspects of probation, role and responsibilities of the juvenile probation officer including pre-sentence investigation reports, conducting risk assessment, case planning, caseload supervision, probation officer safety, professional ethics, and trends in the field.

CRJS 3823 Criminal Justice Research Methods I: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to research techniques such as formulating research questions, research design, and data collection methods such as surveys and case studies. The course also examines research ethics, locating data and navigating the special requirements for conducting research with protected populations such as incarcerated adults and juveniles. Students are also introduced to computer applications for research.

CRJS 3933 Minorities and the Criminal Justice System: 3 semester hours.

An analysis of problems frequently encountered by minorities in the American justice system. This includes police-minority confrontations, an examination of possible bias throughout various levels of the justice system and the contributions of minority criminal justice practitioners, scholars, and activists to the development of the field of criminal justice.

CRJS 4323 Criminal Justice Management Principles: 3 semester hours.

A study of basic criminal justice management theories and contemporary practices. This includes an examination of the unique behaviors, social skills and organizational techniques necessary for the criminal justice professional to be successful in various settings. Special attention is given to relating effectively with superiors, colleagues, subordinates and various members of the public impacted by criminal justice agencies.

CRJS 4416 Undergraduate Internship in Criminal Justice: 6 semester hours.

A student may be required to satisfactorily complete a minimum of three month's internship in an approved criminal justice setting preferably between the junior and senior year. This internship program is specifically designed to acquaint the student with practical aspects of criminal justice.

CRJS 4653 Constitutional Rights of the Criminally Accused: 3 semester hours.

A study of the rights of the criminally accused according to the United States Constitution.

CRJS 4833 Seminar: Criminal Justice Research Methods II: 3 semester hours.

Direction in performing an original research project. This involves an examination of how a choice of research question influences methodology. Basic statistical concepts and techniques for obtaining and analyzing large quantitative data sets will be reviewed. The course also examines techniques for conducting qualitative research and a familiarity with the latest qualitative research software packages.

CRJS 4913 Study of Criminal Justice Systems Abroad: 3 semester hours.

An analysis of criminal justice programs and institutions outside of the United States.

CRJS 4923 Criminology: 3 semester hours.

Focus will be a comprehensive analysis of the sociological, psychological and biological aspects of deviant human behavior.

CRJS 4943 Seminar: Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

Focus on recent significant and controversial issues which affect the administration of justice especially in law enforcement, the courts and corrections.

CRJS 4953 Seminar: Special Topics in Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

This course has a revolving theme from semester to semester. Theme areas include but are not limited to policing, courts, corrections, ethics, women and crime, economics and crime, white collar crime, terrorism, consensual crime, victimology, alternative dispute resolution, media influences and special topics in juvenile justice. (May be repeated once for credit as the course theme changes).

CRJS 4963 Philosophy of Crime: 3 semester hours.

An examination of religious and economic principles as they shape the definition and response to crime. This includes an analysis of specific concepts such as guilt, shame, care, love, desire and dignity on the evolution of deviance and crime across time and place in the western world.

CRJS 4973 Women and Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

An ideological and historical analysis of the role of women and criminal justice as reformers, professionals, scholars, and as offenders.

CRJS 4983 Ethical Decision-Making in Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

An overview of ethical theories, concepts, and issues. Illustrates the major unethical themes common in Criminal Justice management. Illustrates ethical dilemmas in policing, courts, prisons, community corrections, and crime prevention. The class works together to develop foundational ethical truths upon which to logically develop practice of moral decision making.

CRJS 4993 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research or fieldwork on selected topics.