Chemistry

Chemistry Courses

CHEM 1106 General Chemistry Lab: 1 semester hour.

A laboratory course in general chemistry for students in the health sciences.
Prerequisites: CHEM 1306 (may be taken concurrently) or CHEM 1053 (may be taken concurrently).

CHEM 1111 General Chemistry Lab I: 1 semester hour.

A general laboratory course covering aspects of qualitative and quantitative analysis and determination of chemical and physical properties.
Prerequisites: (CHEM 1311 or CHEM 1013) and (CHEM 1303 or CHEM 1033) and (MATH 1314 or MATH 1113).

CHEM 1112 General Chemistry Lab II: 1 semester hour.

The second semester continuation of CHEM 1111. A general laboratory course covering aspects of qualitative and quantitative analysis and determination of chemical and physical properties.
Prerequisites: ((MATH 1314 or MATH 1113) or (MATH 1511 or MATH 1115)) and ((CHEM 1403 (may be taken concurrently) or CHEM 1034 (may be taken concurrently)) or (CHEM 1304 (may be taken concurrently) or CHEM 1043 (may be taken concurrently))).

CHEM 1203 General Chemistry Lab: 2 semester hours.

For students majoring or minoring in chemistry. A general laboratory course covering aspects of volumetric and gravimetric analysis, qualitative analysis, determination of chemical and physical properties, and chemical synthesis.
Prerequisites: ((MATH 1314 (may be taken concurrently) or MATH 1113 (may be taken concurrently)) or (MATH 1511 (may be taken concurrently) or MATH 1115 (may be taken concurrently))) and (CHEM 1303 or CHEM 1033).

CHEM 1204 General Chemistry Lab: 2 semester hours.

For students majoring or minoring in chemistry. A continuation of CHEM 1032. General laboratory course covering aspects of volumetric, gravimetric and qualitative analyses; determination of chemical and physical properties, and chemical synthesis.
Prerequisites: ((MATH 1113 or MATH 1314) or (MATH 1511 or MATH 1115)) and (CHEM 1043 or CHEM 1304).

CHEM 1303 General Inorganic Chemistry: 3 semester hours.

For students majoring or minoring in chemistry. Theory of matter and concepts of measurement, atoms, molecules and ions. Stoichiometry and chemical calculations, reactions in aqueous solutions, kinetics of gases, thermo-chemistry, atomic structure, electron configurations and chemical bonds.
Prerequisites: (MATH 1314 or MATH 1113) or (MATH 1511 or MATH 1115).

CHEM 1304 General Inorganic Chemistry: 3 semester hours.

For students majoring or minoring in chemistry. A continuation of CHEM 1033. Bonding theory and molecular structure, intermolecular forces properties of solutions, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-based equilibria, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry and introduction to organic chemistry.
Prerequisites: (MATH 1314 or MATH 1113) or (CHEM 1303 or CHEM 1033).

CHEM 1306 Introductory Chemistry I: 3 semester hours.

n introductory course to essential chemical principles including atoms, atomic structure, molecules, compounds, elementary stoichiometry, and calculations, type of chemical reactions and fundamental principles. The interpretation and evaluation of case studies to develop fundamental knowledge and skills. This course will require a fair amount of writing and teamwork. For health science and nonmajors.

CHEM 1311 General Chemistry I: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed for non-majors and non-minors. This first semester course entails exploration of the fundamental concepts, laws and theory of chemistry through study of the states of matter. A descriptive view of the periodic chart, chemical properties, reactions, and chemical bonding theories and stoichiometry.
Prerequisites: MATH 1314 or MATH 1113.
Co-requisite: MATH 1314.

CHEM 1403 Chemistry for Engineers: 4 semester hours.

Fundamental and Physical principles in chemistry, bonding, thermodynamics and kinetics with emphasis to engineering applications.
Prerequisites: (CHEM 1303 or CHEM 1033) or (CHEM 1311 or CHEM 1013).

CHEM 2201 Quantitative Analysis: 2 semester hours.

Introduction to the principles and techniques of volumetric and gravimetric analysis employing modem instrumentation. Techniques include potentiometric, spectral-photometric, precipitation, electrochemical, and separation methods.
Prerequisites: (CHEM 1303 or CHEM 1033) and (CHEM 1204 or CHEM 1042) and (CHEM 1304 or CHEM 1043).

CHEM 2203 Organic Chemistry I: 2 semester hours.

A laboratory course including qualitative and quantitative investigations focusing on preparation and characterization of organic compounds.
Prerequisites: CHEM 2303 (may be taken concurrently) or CHEM 2033 (may be taken concurrently).

CHEM 2204 Organic Chemistry Lab II: 2 semester hours.

This is a continuation of CHEM 2203.
Prerequisites: CHEM 2304 (may be taken concurrently) or CHEM 2043 (may be taken concurrently).

CHEM 2211 Quantitative Analysis Lab: 2 semester hours.

This course is a continuation of the CHEM 2201.
Prerequisites: (CHEM 1204 or CHEM 1042) and (CHEM 2201 (may be taken concurrently) or CHEM 2012 (may be taken concurrently)).

CHEM 2303 General Organic Chemistry I: 3 semester hours.

For chemistry majors and minors, chemical engineering, and science majors. Electronic structure and bonding, introduction to organic compounds, reactions of alkenes, stereochemistry, reactions of alkynes, electron delocalization and resonance, reaction of dienes, substitution and elimination reactions.
Prerequisites: CHEM 1304 or CHEM 1043.

CHEM 2304 General Organic Chemistry II: 3 semester hours.

For chemistry majors and minors, chemical engineering, and science majors. A continuation of CHEM 2033. Substitution and elimination reactions, spectroscopic identification of organic compounds, reactions of substituted benzenes, reactions of carbonyl compounds, bioorganic compounds and special topics in organic chemistry.
Prerequisites: CHEM 2303 or CHEM 2033.

CHEM 3242 Physical Chemistry Lab: 2 semester hours.

A laboratory course including experimental studies in chemical thermodynamics, equilibria, chemical kinetics, transport properties, spectroscopy, and molecular structure.
Prerequisites: CHEM 3341 (may be taken concurrently) or CHEM 3413.
Co-requisite: CHEM 3341.

CHEM 3243 Physical Chemistry Lab: 2 semester hours.

This course is a continuation of CHEM 3242.
Co-requisite: CHEM 3342.

CHEM 3341 Physical Chemistry: 3 semester hours.

A rigorous treatment of thermodynamics (Laws), thermo-chemistry, application of thermodynamic laws to gases (ideal and real), chemical equilibria, ionic equilibria, and electrochemistry.
Prerequisites: (CHEM 1304 or CHEM 1403) and (MATH 2413 or MATH 1124).

CHEM 3342 Physical Chemistry: 3 semester hours.

A continuation of CHEM 3413. Rate processes, kinetic theory and transport properties of gasses and liquids. An introduction to the Fundamentals of Quantum mechanics and spectroscopy. Atomic and molecular structure. Electric and magnetic properties of molecules.
Prerequisites: MATH 2320 or MATH 2043 and (CHEM 3341 or CHEM 3413).

CHEM 4100 Journal Reading and Chemical Literature: 1 semester hour.

Initial instruction in the methodology and practice of efficient use of the chemical literature. Detailed study of recent developments in chemistry. Designed to develop and stimulate research attitudes.

CHEM 4105 Research: 1 semester hour.

Library and laboratory work on selected problems.

CHEM 4106 Research: 1 semester hour.

Library and laboratory work on selected problems.

CHEM 4203 Forensic Chemistry Lab: 2 semester hours.

Drug identification and confirmatory tests using spectroscopic techniques that include HPLC, GC, ICP/ AES, FTIR. Sample handling and storage.
Prerequisites: CHEM 4305 or CHEM 4053.

CHEM 4204 Biochemistry Laboratory: 2 semester hours.

Experiments in basic methodology for the isolation, purification and characterization of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids and enzymes from natural products.
Prerequisites: CHEM 4303 (may be taken concurrently) or CHEM 4033 (may be taken concurrently).
Co-requisite: CHEM 4303.

CHEM 4205 Instrumental Analysis Lab: 2 semester hours.

Laboratory course that includes experimental applications of spectroscopy, electro-analytical methods, and chromatography.
Co-requisite: CHEM 4305.

CHEM 4302 Forensic Chemistry: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to forensic science, chemical evidence handling, analysis and drug classification. Sampling techniques in forensic chemistry.
Prerequisites: CHEM 2304 or CHEM 2043.
Co-requisite: CHEM 4303.

CHEM 4303 Biochemistry: 3 semester hours.

A study of the chemistry of biological molecules: proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and nucleic acids. Enzyme catalysis, Bioenergetics, Metabolism of carbohydrates, fats and proteins. Interrelationship of the metabolic pathways.
Prerequisites: CHEM 2303 or CHEM 2033 and CHEM 2304 or CHEM 2043.

CHEM 4305 Instrumental Analysis: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the theory and application of modern instrumentation and techniques to the analysis of chemical systems. Includes interpretive spectroscopy, computer-assigned experimentation, and the use of the chemical literature.
Prerequisites: CHEM 3341 or CHEM 3413.

CHEM 4306 Inorganic Chemistry: 3 semester hours.

Modern atomic theory and the Periodic System, valence and bonding. The constitution of inorganic compounds; coordination chemistry and ligand field theory. The chemistry of nonmetals including polyacids, peracids and hydrides. Reactions in non-aqueous systems. Some interstitial and nonstoichiometric compounds. Radioactivity and atomic integration.
Prerequisites: CHEM 3341 or CHEM 3413.

CHEM 4399 Independent Study: 1-3 semester hour.

Readings, research, and/or field work on selected topics.

CHEM 5232 Instrumental Lab: 2 semester hours.

An integrated laboratory that uses modern instrumentation to analyze complex chemical systems. Theories and principles encountered in CHEM 5313 (5331) and CHEM 5323(5332) will provide the basis for bulk, surface, and interfacial analysis at the atomic and molecular levels.
Prerequisites: CHEM 5331 or CHEM 5313 and (CHEM 5332 or CHEM 5323).

CHEM 5240 Advanced Organic Chemistry: 2 semester hours.

A review of elementary Organic Chemistry with an extension of more advanced topics. Includes assigned subject materials.

CHEM 5301 Research: 3 semester hours.

Problems for investigation may be selected from one of the following fields of Chemistry: 1. Analytical; 2. Biochemistry; 3. Inorganic; 4. Organic; and 5. Physical.

CHEM 5302 Research: 3 semester hours.

Problems for investigation may be selected from one of the following fields of Chemistry: 1. Analytical; 2. Biochemistry; 3. Inorganic; 4. Organic; and 5. Physical.

CHEM 5331 Advanced Analytical Chemistry: 3 semester hours.

Fundamental principles and investigation of chemical reactions as they relate to application of classical and modern instrumental methods. Focuses on the processes occurring in sampling, separation and quantitative measurement emphasizing chemical concepts.
Prerequisites: CHEM 5378 or CHEM 5738.

CHEM 5332 Instrumental Analysis: 3 semester hours.

Fundamental principles and theories underlying modern instrumental methods and techniques for analysis of complex systems. Atomic and molecular level characterization of surfaces, interfaces, and bulk systems will be emphasized.
Prerequisites: CHEM 5378 or CHEM 5783.

CHEM 5361 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry: 3 semester hours.

Consideration of important aspects of modern inorganic chemistry. Application of thermodynamics and kinetics in inorganic chemistry; practical and potential applications of inorganic systems.

CHEM 5378 Advanced Physical Chemistry: 3 semester hours.

A lecture course dealing with advanced topics of special interest in modern physical chemistry in areas including experimental and theoretical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, collision and transition state theories, atomic and molecular spectra, quantum mechanical systems, photochemistry, structure of crystals and liquids, surface chemistry, macro-molecules, and gas phase reactions.

CHEM 5399 Independent Study: 1-3 semester hour.

Individual studies in advanced chemistry, reading, literature research/analysis/problem solving/writing research reports on selected topics in advanced chemistry.

CHEM 5441 Identification of Organic Compounds: 4 semester hours.

The separation and identification of pure organic compounds and mixtures.

CHEM 5453 General Biochemistry: 4 semester hours.

A basic and extension course designed for graduate students planning to major or minor in Biochemistry or related fields and who require more than an elementary knowledge of the subject.

CHEM 5499 Independent Study: 1-4 semester hour.

Individual studies in advanced chemistry, reading, literature research/analysis/problem solving/writing research reports on selected topics in advanced chemistry.

CHEM 5602 Research: 6 semester hours.

Problems for investigation may be selected from one of the following fields of chemistry: 1. Analytical; 2. Biochemistry; 3. Inorganic; 4. Organic; and 5. Physical.

Physical Science Courses

PHSC 1112 Sci Lab: 1 semester hour.

Physical science laboratory course designed to enhance knowledge of basic principles of physical science and physical processes in our environment. Selected topics on physics, chemistry, astronomy, meteorology and geology will be emphasized with attention directed to current applications and discoveries.

PHSC 1315 Physical Science I: 3 semester hours.

PHSC 2312 Physical Science II: 3 semester hours.

An interdisciplinary examination of the physical and biological sciences. The course helps students understand how quantitative tools are used in modern scientific discovery. The course includes basic concepts of mechanics, chemistry, and astronomy.
Prerequisites: PHSC 1315 or PHSC 1123.

PHSC 3308 Science of Everyday: 3 semester hours.

A description of daily phenomena, demonstrating how science provides a basis for comprehending them and discusses relationships between various apparently unrelated phenomena.

PHSC 3322 Introduction to Atmospheric Science: 3 semester hours.

Structure of the atmosphere. Physical and chemical phenomena leading to atmospheric changes. Weather patterns and climate control. On-line Weather Studies course is included.

PHSC 4101 Earth Science Lab: 1 semester hour.

Laboratory to support PHSC 4013. Exercises include: classification of minerals and rock types; water testing and analysis; field work. Also covered will be online weather studies, analysis and interpretation of real-time meteorological data.

PHSC 4301 Earth Science: 3 semester hours.

Designed for science teachers in junior and senior high schools. It covers basic concepts of earth science and methods of teaching. The content covers a study of geology, meteorology, hydrology, petrology, and mineralogy. A study analysis and evaluation of some of the recent systems and techniques in the teaching of earth science. Elements from Online Weather Studies course are included.
Prerequisites: PHSC 1315.
Co-requisite: PHSC 4101.

PHSC 4399 Independent Study: 1-3 semester hour.

Readings, research, and/or field work on selected topics.

PHSC 4402 Astronomy and Geology: 4 semester hours.

An introduction to earth science concepts with a more advanced approach involving research materials, including astronomy, geology, paleontology, and field experiences as content materials.

Physics Courses

PHYS 1101 General Physics Lab I: 1 semester hour.

General physics laboratory on concepts of mechanics to include experiments on measurement, vectors-force table, air track, projectile motion, static and kinetic friction, ballistic pendulum, centripetal force, moment of inertia, Hooke's law and simple harmonic motion, standing waves and sound.
Prerequisites: PHYS 1301 (may be taken concurrently) or PHYS 2113 (may be taken concurrently).

PHYS 1102 General Physics Lab II: 1 semester hour.

General physics laboratory to include experiments on determination of absolute zero, linear expansion, calorimetry, force of static electricity, Ohm's Law, color-coded resistors, resistors in series and parallel, RC-series transient circuit, RLC-series circuit, AC circuits, concave and convex lenses, and diffraction gratings.
Prerequisites: (PHYS 1301 or PHYS 2113) and (PHYS 1302 (may be taken concurrently) or PHYS 2123 (may be taken concurrently)).

PHYS 1301 General Physics I: 3 semester hours.

An algebra and trigonometry based introduction to general physics with topics to include measurement system, motion, vector addition, Newton's laws of motion, statics, dynamics, mechanical energy, gravitation, momentum, circular and angular motion, and torque.
Prerequisites: (MATH 1314 or MATH 1113) or (MATH 1511 or MATH 1115) or (MATH 1316 or MATH 1123).

PHYS 1302 General Physics II: 3 semester hours.

A continuation of algebra and trigonometry based General Physics I course includes sound, heat, electricity, magnetism, and optics.
Prerequisites: (PHYS 1301 or PHYS 2113) or (PHYS 2325 or PHYS 2513).

PHYS 2125 University Physics Lab I: 1 semester hour.

Calculus-based physics laboratory on concepts of mechanics to include experiments on measurement, vectors-force table, air track, projectile motion, static and kinetic friction, ballistic pendulum, centripetal force, moment of inertia, Hooke's law and simple harmonic motion, standing waves and sound.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2325 (may be taken concurrently) or PHYS 2513 (may be taken concurrently).

PHYS 2126 University Physics Lab II: 1 semester hour.

Calculus-based physics laboratory to include experiments on determination of absolute zero, linear expansion, calorimetry, string standing waves, sound resonance, force of static electricity, Ohm's Law, color-coded resistors, resistors in series and parallel. RC-series transient circuit, RLC-series circuit, AC circuits, concave and convex lenses, and diffraction gratings.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2326 (may be taken concurrently) or PHYS 2523 (may be taken concurrently).

PHYS 2325 University Physics I: 3 semester hours.

A calculus-based introductory physics course for science and engineering students. Course includes measurement, Newton's laws of motion statics, dynamics, mechanical energy, momentum, circular motion, and selected topics from torque, modules, Newton universal law, and fluid mechanics.
Prerequisites: MATH 2413 or MATH 1124.

PHYS 2326 University Physics II: 3 semester hours.

A continuation of PHYS 2513, a calculus-based introductory physics course for science and engineering students. Course includes electricity, magnetism, and selected topics from , sound and light.
Prerequisites: (PHYS 2325 or PHYS 2513) and (MATH 2414 or MATH 2024).

PHYS 3310 Mechanics I: 3 semester hours.

The course content includes elements of vector analysis, rectilinear motion of a particle, Newton's laws, damped and forced harmonic motion, Fourier series, motion of a particle in three dimensions, rotating coordinate systems, gravitation, central force motion.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2326 or PHYS 2523.

PHYS 3312 Electricity and Magnetism I: 3 semester hours.

Basic theory of electrostatics; Coulomb's Law, Gauss's Theorem, simple potential theory, LaPlace's and Poisson's equations. Calculation of electric fields and potentials for point and continuous charge distributions. Computer-based demonstrations are included.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2326 or PHYS 2523.

PHYS 3316 Mathematical Physics I: 3 semester hours.

Advanced mathematics for physicists and engineers; vector analysis, curvilinear coordinates, tensor analysis, matrices and determinants, infinite series, functions of a complex variable. Emphasis throughout is on practical applications of theory and techniques as applied to problems in physics and engineering. Computer programs such as Mathematica and MAT LAB will be used.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2326.

PHYS 3318 Modern Physics I: 3 semester hours.

Course content includes relativity, wave-particle duality, atomic structure, quantum mechanics, and quantum theory of the hydrogen atom.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2326.

PHYS 3324 Introduction to Nuclear, Particle and Radiation Physics: 3 semester hours.

Nuclear models, nuclear reactions, fundamentals of particle physics, classification of radiation particles, radiation transport, radiation scattering, radiation decay, radiation measurement, and radiation effects.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2326.

PHYS 4191 Physics Research Project: 1 semester hour.

The first half of a two semester sequence. A research project with a faculty advisor or mentor. Includes literature survey preparation and initiation of a research project.
Prerequisites: PHYS 3318 or PHYS 3183.

PHYS 4192 Physics Research Seminar: 1 semester hour.

The second half of a two semester sequence. A research project with a faculty advisor or mentor. Continues the initiated research from the earlier course (PHYS 4911) towards a research publication.
Prerequisites: PHYS 4191.

PHYS 4302 Introductory Quantum Mechanics I: 3 semester hours.

Inadequacy of classical mechanics, wave-particle duality, wave function, uncertainty relation, Schrodinger equation, expectation values, operator formalism, measurement, the correspondence principle, etc.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2326 or PHYS 2523.

PHYS 4306 Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics: 3 semester hours.

Macroscopic thermodynamic systems, kinetic theory, black body radiation, classical and quantum statistical mechanics to include Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein, and Fermi-Dirac Statistics.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2326 or PHYS 2523 and (PHYS 2123 or PHYS 2312) and (MATH 3014 or MATH 3401).

PHYS 4310 Advanced Physics Lab: 3 semester hours.

Computational physics modeling and simulations; several types of physics problem modeled and solved; software including Mathematica, MA TLAB, Numerical Recipes, Electronics Workbench, will be utilized.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2326.

PHYS 4316 Special Topics PHYS: 3 semester hours.

Selected current and emerging topics in Physics. Courses may be repeated for credit when topics vary.

PHYS 4399 Independent Study: 1-3 semester hour.

Readings, research, and/or field work on selected topics.