Division of Social Sciences

Geography Courses

GEOG 1302 Introduction to Human Geography: 3 semester hours.

A survey of the cultural and physical elements of geography, their characteristics, spatial organization, and distribution as viewed in the discipline today.

GEOG 1303 World Regional Geography: 3 semester hours.

A survey of the regions and nations of the world and the geographical foundations of their physical and cultural characteristics; a practical and systematic approach to the field of geography; a survey of the world in terms of outlook and regional types.

GEOG 2311 Introduction to Geographic Information System: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the fundamentals of Geographic Information System (GIS) and science and art of making maps. The course introduces students to the basic principles of using GIS as a tool for managing and analyzing spatial data.

History Courses

HIST 1301 United States History I: 3 semester hours.

This course covers American development from the era of discovery to the close of the Civil War. This course includes modules on the following topics: the colonial era; the young republic; westward expansion; and sectionalism; Civil War, and Reconstruction.

HIST 1302 United States History II: 3 semester hours.

Surveys modern American development: the industrial nation and its problems; expansionist and muckraker; the First Crusade, Normalcy and Reaction, Depression, and the New Deal; and the Second World War and after. Lectures, special readings, discussion, supervised study, and tests.

HIST 2300 Intro to Historical Methods: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed to introduce students to the historical profession, with emphasis on research methods, historical analysis and writing, and career paths for historians.

HIST 2301 Texas History: 3 semester hours.

Survey of Texas starting from Spanish colonization to the present. Emphasis will be placed on contributions made to the state of Texas by various ethnic groups.

HIST 2320 Military History: 3 semester hours.

Military History - Past Wars, conflicts and study of war heroes.

HIST 2321 World Civilizations I: 3 semester hours.

Survey of the ancient world from the dawn of civilization in Egypt, Mesopotamia, China, India and Mesoamerica through the Middle Ages in Europe. Attention is given to political, social and economic institutions as well as art, literature and religion.

HIST 2322 World Civilizations II: 3 semester hours.

Survey of key developments in Western and non-Western civilizations from the Renaissance in Europe to the present. Special emphasis is placed on religious expansion and conflict, militarism, intellectual and political revolutions, formation of modern national-states, and colonialism and post colonialism.

HIST 2381 African-American History: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the history of persons of African descent on the North American continent from the settlement of Jamestown to present. Integral to students' exposure to African-American History will be their exposure to basic research methods and writing techniques. Students should be prepared to examine major issues and historical events including, but not limited to: the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, the black presence in Colonial America, the development of chattel slavery, Abolitionism, Emancipation, Jim Crow, the Nadir, the Great Migration, the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights Movement, and Black Power Era.

HIST 3301 Introduction to Public History: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the role of historical memory in shaping our understanding of the past through examining the history of museums, archives, and historical research centers. Students will be introduced to the practices, theories and various sectors of public history, and will utilize an interdisciplinary approach in documenting, preserving and curating history.

HIST 3315 Ancient Egypt & the Near East: 3 semester hours.

An advanced survey of the civilizations of ancient Egypt and the Near East(Middle East). Students will read primary sources in translation and analyze the developments and interactions of ancient Assyrian, Babylonian, Egyptian, Hebrew, Hittite, Persian, and Sumerian civilizations.

HIST 3316 Ancient Greece: 3 semester hours.

An advanced survey of ancient Greece, tracing the developments of the cultural, political, intellectual, and artistic achievements of Greek civilization from the Bronze Age through the conquest of Macedonia. Students will read primary sources in translation and analyze important Greek personalities and events, as well as methods and problems of historical interpretation.

HIST 3317 Ancient Rome: 3 semester hours.

An advanced survey of ancient Rome, tracing the developments of the cultural, political, intellectual, and artistic achievements of Roman civilization from the foundation of the City, through Kingdom, Republic, and Empire, to the fifth century A.D. Students will read primary sources in translation and analyze important Roman personalities and events as well as methods and problems of of historical interpretation.

HIST 3318 Medieval Europe: 3 semester hours.

An advanced survey of political, social, economic, and cultural developments of European civilizations from the end of the Roman Empire to the dawn of the fifteenth-century Renaissance. Students will read primary courses in translation and analyze medieval personalities and events, as well as methods and problems of historical interpretation.

HIST 3322 Women in History: 3 semester hours.

A survey of selected issues related to the historical status of women in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas, with emphasis on African-American women in the United States since slavery.

HIST 3332 Contemporary United States: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of the emergence of the United States as a modern nation and examination of the changing United States' social, political, economic, cultural and diplomatic scene with emphasis on the progressive trends, 1900 - Present.

HIST 3350 American Chattel Slavery: 3 semester hours.

This course examines the development of slavery in the making of American society, and particularly the American South, from the early colonial period through Reconstruction. Attention will be given to the following topics: the Atlantic origins of slavery; the emergence of colonial plantation societies; the development of a distinct slave society within the plantation; and the causes and consequences of secession (Civil War and Reconstruction). Finally, we will consider Southern life in the aftermath of emancipation and the establishment of Jim Crow racial segregation in the revival of antebellum racial ideologies.

HIST 3353 Civil Rights Movement: 3 semester hours.

This course focuses on America's Second Reconstruction, The Civil Rights Movement that ran throughout the entirety of the twentieth century. Students will engage materials that highlight the impact that the Civil Rights Movement had on the citizenship status of African-Americans. Major historical events and individuals covered include, but are not limited to: The Great Migration, the founding of the NAACP, Charles Hamilton Houston, ASA Philip Randolph, the March on Washington Movement, the Civil Rights Movement, Charles Hamilton Houston, Thurgood Marshall, Bayard Rustin, Martin Luther King, Jr., Linda Brown, Malcolm X, the Murder of Emmett Louis Till, Jackie Robinson, The Black Panther Party for Self-Defense, The Rise of Black Power, Affirmative Action, the rise of the Prison Industrial Complex, and the election of Barack Hussein Obama.

HIST 3360 Atlantic World: 3 semester hours.

This course analyzes the exploration/colonization of the Atlantic Basin, the genesis of slave societies in the Western Hemisphere, and the social, political, and economic legacies of colonial regimes in the Americas and along the western coast of Africa from 1400 to 1900. This course utilizes power, gender, race, and class as categories of analysis to bring light to understanding this region.

HIST 3361 Colonial Latin Amer & Carrib: 3 semester hours.

An advanced survey of Latin American and Caribbean histories and cultures. Special emphasis on colonization, slavery, and emancipation and independence movements particularly in connection to contemporary social, economic, and political issues impacting the region. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach, the art, music, geography and literature of the regions will also be explored.

HIST 3370 Pre-Colonial Africa: 3 semester hours.

Study of African history before the arrival of the Europeans that examines the growth and evolution of political, social, and economic institutions of various African countries. Special attention will be given to the western portion of Africa (Ghana, Mali, and Songhay) and areas south of the Sahara.

HIST 3371 Post-Colonial African History: 3 semester hours.

HIST 3375 African Diaspora: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the people of African descent. Students will explore origins on the continent of Africa, the places blacks were dispersed to as a result of the slave trade, emancipation movements across the globe, and the movements for black equality around the world. The course also examines the musical, artistic, literary, and cultural contributions of people of African descent.

HIST 3399 Independent Study: 1-3 semester hour.

Readings, research, and/or field work on selected topics.

HIST 4195 TExES Prep-Hist/Soc Studies: 1 semester hour.

This course is designed to help students prepare to take the Texas Examination of Educator Standards(TExES) in History/Social Studies. This course is typically taken the semester before Student Teaching, or during the senior year for those who are doing alternative certification.

HIST 4305 Early Christianity: 3 semester hours.

An exploration of early Christianity from its emergence within Second-Temple Judaism to its spread and influence within the Roman world to the fourth century AD. Students will read primary sources in translation and analyze the development of the Church as an institution and community, issues of Christian doctrine and discipline, as well as methods and problems of historical interpretation.

HIST 4344 Special Topics: 3 semester hours.

This course will focus on specific historical topics that the professor deems appropriate and student's desire. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

HIST 4381 African-American Hist to 1876: 3 semester hours.

Intensive readings in a broad range of texts that form the foundation of the African-American historical experience. Students will deal with readings that cover an expansive time frame ranging from the colonization of Africa through the ending of the American Reconstruction. This course will provide students an opportunity to read seminal texts by scholars who have written about the African-American experience. Major issues and historical figures covered: the colonization of Africa, the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, American chattel slavery, Black Abolitionism, Frederick Douglass, Nat Turner, Linda Brent, Harriet Tubman, Sojourner Truth, the Underground Railroad, Emancipation, and the Reconstruction era.

HIST 4382 African-Amer Hist Since 1876: 3 semester hours.

Intensive readings in a broad range of texts that form the foundation of the African-American historical experience during the modern period. Students will deal with readings covering a period that extends from the Nadir through contemporary America.This course will provide students an opportunity to read seminal texts by scholars who have written about the post-slavery African-American experience. Major issues and historical figures covered include, but are not limited to: the Nadir, Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, The Great Migration, The Harlem Renaissance, the March on Washington Movement, the Civil Rights Movement, the Murder of Emmett Louis Till, Malcolm X, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense, the decline of Urban America, the rise of the Prison Industrial Complex, and the election of Barack Hussein Obama.

HIST 4390 Senior Seminar: 3 semester hours.

Advanced training in historical methods and historiography designed to measure student's understanding and mastery of the discipline.

HIST 4399 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research, and/or field work on selected topics.

Philosophy Courses

PHIL 2303 Critical Thinking: 3 semester hours.

Course is designed to develop students' ability to recognize and evaluate arguments. Focus will include: The most frequently encountered fallacies and errors in reasoning; the use/abuse of statistics; and principles of logic applied to daily life.
Prerequisites: ENGL 1123 or ENGL 1301.

PHIL 2306 Ethics: 3 semester hours.

Combines the philosophical study of normative ethics with the study of contemporary applied ethics through examination of a number of tendencies and schools of ethics from various cultures, societies and historical periods. The aim of the course is to enhance the student's awareness and sensitivity to the perplexity of morality and the moral life.
Prerequisites: ENGL 1123 or ENGL 1301.

PHIL 2307 African American Philosophy: 3 semester hours.

This course is a survey of the philosophical writings of some of the most important African American thinkers from the nineteenth to twenty-first century. Its aim is to gain familiarity with the works of influential African American philosophers while also learning to engage critically and responsibly with philosophical texts.
Prerequisites: ENGL 1123 or ENGL 1301.

PHIL 3304 Philosophy of Science: 3 semester hours.

This course will introduce and explore conceptual, methodological, and epistemological issues about science: concept formation, explanation, prediction, confirmation, and theory construction; the status of unobservable; metaphysical presuppositions and implications of science; semantics of scientific language; illustrations from special sciences.
Prerequisites: ENGL 1123 or ENGL 1301 and (PHIL 2303).

PHIL 3305 Philosophy of Law: 3 semester hours.

Examination of the main fields of law, including criminal law, torts, constitutional law, contracts, property law, jurisprudence and international law. The focus will be on the underlying philosophical, moral and jurisprudential rationales for these; and classic texts and landmark cases will be read, to illuminate these fields. Students will also acquire legal reasoning and critical thinking skills, to help them distinguish stronger from weaker legal arguments and rulings.
Prerequisites: ENGL 1123 or ENGL 1301 and (PHIL 2023 or PHIL 2306).

PHIL 3306 Bioethics: 3 semester hours.

Provides grounding in basic theories, principles, and historical cases concerning bioethics.
Prerequisites: ENGL 1123 or ENGL 1301 and (PHIL 2023 or PHIL 2306).

PHIL 3307 Environmental Ethics: 3 semester hours.

This course is an interdisciplinary examination and assessment of the leading global thesis on environmental ethics, climate change, and sustainability. The aim of the course is to gain familiarity with contemporary global environmental issues while also learning to engage critically and responsibly with arguments concerning ethical action and environmental policy.
Prerequisites: PHIL 2023 or PHIL 2306.

PHIL 3308 Global Social Justice and Ethics: 3 semester hours.

This course is an interdisciplinary examination and assessment of the leading global theories on human rights, social justice, and ethics. The aim of the course is to gain familiarity with contemporary global challenges while also learning to engage critically and responsibly with arguments concerning ethical action and policy to address them.
Prerequisites: PHIL 2023 or PHIL 2306.

Political Science Courses

POSC 2304 Introduction to Political Science: 3 semester hours.

This is an introductory course in the study of politics, the various sub-fields in the discipline, and the variety of approaches used in the study of Political Science.
Prerequisites: POSC 2305 and POSC 2306.

POSC 2305 American Government: 3 semester hours.

Surveys the origin and development of the U.S. Constitution; the structure and powers of the national government including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches; federalism; areas of political participation; the national election process; public policy ; civil liberties and civil rights.

POSC 2306 Texas Government: 3 semester hours.

Surveys the origin and development of the Texas Constitution; the structure and powers of Texas Government, including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches; local government; areas of political participation and public policy in Texas.

POSC 2311 Political Parties and Elections: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed to study the nature, functions, evolution, and organization of the American political parties and elections.

POSC 2312 Public Administration: 3 semester hours.

This course provides an examination of the organization, responsibility, personnel management, fiscal processes, functions, and problems of public administration.

POSC 2314 Legal Studies: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed to be an extensive examination of the structure, functions, and processes of this nation's legal system. By the end of the course, students will have training in a wide variety of topics involving the law and have the skills necessary to succeed on the LSAT or in law school.

POSC 2321 Blacks and the American Political System: 3 semester hours.

This course offers a critical analysis of the position of blacks in the American politico-economic system, both historically and contemporarily.

POSC 2341 Scope and Methods in Political Science: 3 semester hours.

This course introduces majors to the various methods and approaches used in the field of Political Science.

POSC 2350 Global Issues: 3 semester hours.

Critical evaluation of selected current issues and problems in world politics facing the global community, such as war, terrorism,, the environment , hunger, energy, population, migration, human rights , and trade.

POSC 2353 Latin American and Caribbean Politics: 3 semester hours.

Designed to provide a comprehensive introduction to Latin American and Caribbean politics from a multi-disciplinary perspective. Examines the various dimensions of Latin American and Caribbean politics, including political and governmental structures, political and economic development and social stratification patterns. Analyzes the implications of globalization on Latin American and Caribbean political and socio-economic systems.

POSC 2354 State and Local Government: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of state and local governments in the federal system; encompasses an examination of the state and local politics in the United States with an emphasis on politics and public policy.

POSC 3312 Modern Political Theory: 3 semester hours.

This course is a review of the political theories from the Reformation to the present, with special attention to Machiavelli, Boding, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Jefferson, Rousseau, Mills, Hegel, and Marx.

POSC 3314 Election Law and Voting Rights: 3 semester hours.

A thorough examination of election laws at the federal, state, and local levels and how they guide the conduct of elections by officials and voters alike.

POSC 3321 Public Policy Analysis: 3 semester hours.

The course explores the processes involved in the formulation and implementation of authoritative decisions, with emphasis on alternative models of policy analysis and selected issues pertaining to the federal government and bureaucracy.

POSC 3331 Policital Studies Thru Film: 3 semester hours.

This course critically analyzes films that portray concepts and issues that are fundamental to the study of political science, including freedom and equality, power imbalances, revolution and war, and political structures and processes.
Prerequisites: POSC 2305 and POSC 2306.

POSC 3341 Gandhi and King: 3 semester hours.

Historical examination of Gandhian and Kingian nonviolent political resistance in the context of the indian independence movement and the American civil rights movement.
Prerequisites: POSC 2305 and HIST 1302.

POSC 3342 Political Resistance and Social Change: 3 semester hours.

Examines instances in which ordinary citizens forge ways to address the political system when “normal” channels are unavailable to them. Investigates social movements and how ordinarily quiescent masses attempt to impact the political process.

POSC 3351 Comparative Politics: 3 semester hours.

Examines contemporary states in the context of current trends, including modernization, democracy, the environment, human rights, terrorism, security and globalization. Compares countries' governing institutins in case study format.

POSC 3353 U.S. Foreign Policy: 3 semester hours.

This is a study of the American foreign policy, including the objectives, capabilities and formulation process.

POSC 3354 International Politics: 3 semester hours.

The basic problems of international politics, focusing on the power competition among states and other transnational institutions, are the major focus of this course.

POSC 3355 African Politics: 3 semester hours.

Explores the political history and development of African states.

POSC 3359 Middle East Politics: 3 semester hours.

This course makes a comprehensive study of the major issues and dilemmas in contemporary Middle Eastern politics, including the clash of religions and nationalisms, security and stability in the Persian Gulf, the Arab-Israeli conflict, efforts at democratization, and the role of women.

POSC 3399 Independent Study: 1-3 semester hour.

Readings, research, and/or field-work on selected topics. Prerequisite: consent of advisor.

POSC 4310 Urban Government and Politics: 3 semester hours.

This course examines the structure and functions of urban government. Considerable attention is given to the politics and current problems of metropolitan areas.

POSC 4311 American Constitutional Law: 3 semester hours.

The principles of the American constitutional system, judicial interpretation and application of these principles, relative to the powers of government and the rights of individuals, are examined in depth.
Prerequisites: POSC 2305 and POSC 2306.

POSC 4313 The Presidency: 3 semester hours.

This course traces the evolution of the office of the President of the United States while examining presidential powers in the areas of politics, administration, legislation, war, and foreign affairs.

POSC 4314 The Legislative Process: 3 semester hours.

Provides a detailed study of the nature and extent of the legislative process, with special attention to the organization, procedure, and dynamics of policy-making by American legislatures.

POSC 4319 Special Topics in Political Science: 3 semester hours.

This course will focus on specific topics in political science which the professor deems appropriate and students desire. This course is repeatable for up to 9 semester credit hours when topics vary.

POSC 4320 Judicial Politics: 3 semester hours.

This course makes an extensive analysis of the structure, functions and processes of the U.S. judicial and legal systems on both the federal and the state levels.

POSC 4321 Seminar in Political Science: 3 semester hours.

This course is devoted to intensive reading, writing, research, and discussion focusing on selected topics.

POSC 4324 Race, Gender and Public Policy: 3 semester hours.

Examines how racial and gender groups, broadly defined, both influence and are influenced by, American public policy.
Prerequisites: POSC 2305.

POSC 4399 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research, and/or field-work on selected topics. Prerequisite: consent of advisor.

POSC 4615 Internship in Political Science: 1-6 semester hour.

The student will participate in the ongoing work of a government agency, at the local, state, national or international level or a related nongovernment organization that engages in domestic or international political affairs. Administered by the Political Science Program Coordinator in conjunction with onsight intern supervisor.

Sociology Courses

SOCG 1301 General Sociology: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the discipline. Focus on why and how sociologists study social and cultural phenomena such as inequality, race and ethnicity, gender, populations, family, political behavior, deviance, and social change.

SOCG 1306 Social Problems: 3 semester hours.

Application of sociological principles to major social issues and problems in contemporary and global society with particular emphasis on the United States.

SOCG 2301 Sociology of Marriage and Family: 3 semester hours.

Study of families as social institutions. Focus on social facts and theories of the size, composition, and life cycle of families, family violence, family diversity, family change, and myths about the family.

SOCG 2302 Black Families: 3 semester hours.

Students will be introduced to the diverse institutional, cultural, and historical issues relating to the past and present life circumstances of Black American families. Some comparisons will be made with families in Africa and the Diaspora.

SOCG 2305 Social Deviance: 3 semester hours.

This course examines human behavior that violates social norms, the theoretical explainations of deviance, changing definitions of deviant behavior and issues of social conformity, societal sanctions and social control.

SOCG 2306 Sociology of Gender: 3 semester hours.

An exploration of how socializing agents such as the family, media, sports, school, work and religion aid in the development of gender roles, gender identity and gender inequality.

SOCG 2319 Sociology of Minorities: 3 semester hours.

Sociological study of traditional minorities (race, ethnicity, and religion) and new minorities (gender, sexual orientation and disability).

SOCG 2326 Social Psychology: 3 semester hours.

Uses major social psychological perspectives to analyze human behavior and the importance of others in determining self-perception, attitudes, motivation, conformity, communication, altruism, and aggression.

SOCG 3301 Urban Sociology: 3 semester hours.

Study of human settlement patterns, including the origin and development of cities, types of cities, urban political economy, spatial distribution of lifestyles, urban problems and recent trends in urbanization. Examines globalization and the rise of mega-cities and homelessness.

SOCG 3302 Correctional Treatment and Public Policy: 3 semester hours.

Sociological analysis of the historical development and current policies of the correctional system. Analysis of the justice process from crime to conviction: correctional systems (including jails), detention facilities to include local, state, federal and private penal systems.

SOCG 3303 Social Inequality: 3 semester hours.

A consideration of the research findings describing the American class structure. Special attention is given to the various strata, the determinants of membership in these strata, lifestyles and life changes associated with social position and with changes in position.

SOCG 3304 Juvenile Delinquency: 3 semester hours.

Sociological approaches to the nature and extent of juvenile delinquency; historical reasons for considering juvenile delinquency from adult crime perspective; influence of environments that support delinquency such as subcultures, peer groups, and gangs. Examines current societal measures used to address juvenile delinquency.

SOCG 3305 Addiction and Substance Abuse: 3 semester hours.

This course examines the biological, psychological and social forces as causal factors of addiction and examines various types of addictive behavior such as: drugs, alcohol, food, love/sex, gambling and technology.

SOCG 3306 Sociology of Drug Use and Abuse: 3 semester hours.

Historical and contemporary analysis of patterns of use and abuse of legal and non-legal drugs in the U.S. and other parts of the world. Social-psychological impact of abuse, dependence, and addiction. Evaluation of consequences and treatment.

SOCG 3308 Sociology of Probation and Parole: 3 semester hours.

Examines the organization and administration of probation and parole services, including pre-sentence investigation, probation hearings, conditions of probation, and community supervision. Examines parole administration, including operation of Parole Boards, the selection process for parole, boot camp, shock incarceration and emerging issues in probation and parole.

SOCG 3315 African American Urban Life: 3 semester hours.

This course examines African Americans as agents in shaping the urban experience in the United States. Examples will be drawn from communities such as Harlem, NY, the Central Avenue districts of Los Angeles, Chicago’s south Side and the Auburn Avenue districts of Atlanta, as well as others.
Prerequisites: SOCG 1013 or SOCG 1301.

SOCG 3322 Political Sociology: 3 semester hours.

Comparative analysis of political development and political participation including voting behavior, public opinion, political parties and elites; political power and resource distribution in groups, organizations, institutions, communities, and societies.

SOCG 4143 Environmental Sociology: 3 semester hours.

Examines the relationship between humans and the natural world from a historical and cultural perspective exploring the issues of human progress and development, cross-cultural comparisons, the relationship between humans, animals, the land and raw materials, and current environmental problems and potential solutions.

SOCG 4301 Religions in the African Diaspora: 3 semester hours.

Examines the historical progression of traditional African spirituality and cultures across various regions beyond Africa; and historical trends that have shaped the repression of African Diasporic religious life within its social context. Topics within the course will include the following: religious syncretism, black theology, black secularism, freedom movements, repatriation and the role of religious institutions in containing civil society.

SOCG 4302 Special Topics in Sociology: 3 semester hours.

Intensive study of specialized topics in sociology and contemporary social issues. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

SOCG 4304 Collective Behavior and Social Change: 3 semester hours.

Examines the spontaneous behavior of impermanent, unstructured collections of people, including crowds, disaster, revolutions and social movements.

SOCG 4305 Social Statistics: 3 semester hours.

Presentation of sociological data and introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics for social science majors. Includes computer applications.
Prerequisites: MATH 1314.

SOCG 4306 Demography: 3 semester hours.

Study of size, composition, growth and distribution of populations; social causes and consequences of population change; and collection and interpretation of vital statistics and census data.

SOCG 4307 Global Sociology: 3 semester hours.

Study of the interaction of culture, technology and environment in the evolution of social life from hunting and gathering bands to global society. Explores recent theories of global society in the post-cold war world.

SOCG 4314 Environmental Sociology: 3 semester hours.

Examines the relationship between humans and the natural world from a historical and cultural perspective exploring the issues of human progress and development, cross-cultural comparisons, the relationship between humans, animals, the land and raw materials, and current environmental problems and potential solutions.

SOCG 4363 Cultural Sociology: 3 semester hours.

Study of culture including cultural universals, cultural conflicts, and cultural pluralism from a global perspective. Explores the effect of technology on cultural transmission and cultural change.

SOCG 4372 Sociological Research Methods: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to methods of sociological research including experiments, survey research, secondary analysis, and observation. Includes computer applications.

SOCG 4373 Sociological Theory: 3 semester hours.

Critical survey of major sociological theories from classical to contemporary schools of thought.

SOCG 4376 Sociology Internship: 3 semester hours.

Placement in governmental agency, nonprofit organization or business for supervised experience in applied sociology. May require health examination or security clearance.

SOCG 4378 Senior Seminar in Sociology: 3 semester hours.

Final integration of the major works of theory and research in sociology including subfields. Comprehensive exam and major paper required. Restricted to majors and must be taken the semester prior to graduation.

SOCG 4399 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research, and/or field work on selected topics.

SOCG 5312 Social Statistics: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed to enhance students' statistical knowledge of measurement of central tendency, z-test, t-tests, and analysis of variance, correlation techniques and regression analysis.

SOCG 5321 Classical Sociological Theory: 3 semester hours.

Major sociological contributions of the classical theorists including but not limited to Thomas Hobbes, Auguste Comte, Alexis de Tocqueville, Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, Harriet Martineau, W.E.B. DuBois, and Jane Addams, providing the foundation for contemporary theory.

SOCG 5322 Research Methods: 3 semester hours.

Advanced instruction in sociological research requiring a detailed treatment of qualitative and quantitative techniques of data collection and analysis. Written paper based on original research required.

SOCG 5324 Urban Sociology: 3 semester hours.

Examines the social structure of cities and the adjustment people make to urban conditions. Urban neighborhoods, population groupings, social processes, trends and problems are treated in the light of historical, ecological and social factors. A review of selected problems including urban tensions and the persistence of local ties such as family and ethnicity are explored.

SOCG 5326 Sociology of Education: 3 semester hours.

Exploration of knowledge in society and its relationship to the social structure and individual consciousness; how the social attributes of groups as well as individuals affect the production, ordering, and presentation of information as well as the form knowledge takes in a particular society.

SOCG 5328 Aspects Of Poverty: 3 semester hours.

Presentation of several theoretical perspectives on poverty in American society. Past, current, and proposed solutions of poverty are discussed.

SOCG 5333 Crime and Society: 3 semester hours.

A survey of the historical and contemporary explanations of phenomena of crime and criminal behavior from the perspective of contemporary theories and the analysis of evidence supportive of various theoretical positions. Crime measurement and crime statistics are also discussed, as are the techniques for crime analysis.

SOCG 5335 Seminar in Race Relations: 3 semester hours.

Wide range exploration of the dynamics of inter-group relations including historical and sociological factors in race and ethnic relations. An examination of politico-economic and societal development processes that serve to maintain social positions in contemporary society.

SOCG 5341 Contemporary Sociological Theory: 3 semester hours.

Basic ideas of contemporary sociological theory: structuralism, functionalism, conflict, symbolic interaction, exchange; includes but not limited to the works of Parsons, Merton, Mead, Cooley, Goffinan, Coser, Dahrendorf, Marcuse and Habermas and their application to current research.
Prerequisites: SOCG 5321 or SOCG 5213.

SOCG 5342 Social Inequality: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of the nature of social stratification and its relation to other aspects of society: distribution of influence and wealth occupational structural, family relations, religious and educational institutions, minority problems, and cultural patterns. Comparison between open class, caste and other arrangements. Sources of mobility and change in stratification systems. Also addresses the impact of different forms of ranking and the consequent inequalities that arise.

SOCG 5344 Social Movements: 3 semester hours.

Examination of theories and research on social movement and social change; historical and contemporary social movements in the United States and elsewhere; collective violence and protest; terrorism and social and political revolutions.

SOCG 5345 Complex Organizations: 3 semester hours.

Introduces students to the critical examination of modern organizations, the nature of bureaucracy and its effect on personality, social relations, group dynamics and social change. Examines bureaucratic arrangements and processes in a variety of organizational context such as corporations, universities, unions, professionals associations, government bureaus and religious institutions. The role of power in bureaucratic settings and exchanges is explored.

SOCG 5346 Special Topics: 3 semester hours.

Seminar on specialized topics in sociology. Subject matter may vary by semester. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

SOCG 5352 Black Family: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed to explore the Black family from a number of different perspectives. We will research and discuss how institutions affect family structure, relationships, socioeconomic conditions, health and other factors. Different theoretical frameworks will be used to explain the historical and contemporary status and experiences of Black families in the United States.

SOCG 5355 Sociology of Gender and Sex Roles: 3 semester hours.

Analyzes the social significance of gender through the exploration of the theoretical nature of women's oppression and inequalities between women and men. A cross-cultural analysis of the development of gender roles and an examination of contemporary gender inequality in terms of gendered work patterns, labor force participation, and occupational mobility as well as alternatives to conventional division of labor by sex in society.

SOCG 5361 Thesis: 3 semester hours.

A candidate for the Master of Sociology is required to prepare a thesis under the direction of a faculty thesis committee. The thesis must be orally defended and approved by all members of the faculty thesis committee before the degree is conferred. The student must register for thesis each semester until satisfactorily completed.

SOCG 5362 Thesis: 3 semester hours.

A candidate for the Master of Sociology is required to prepare a thesis under the direction of a faculty thesis committee. The thesis must be orally defended and approved by all members of the faculty thesis committee before the degree is conferred. The student must register for thesis each semester until satisfactorily completed.
Prerequisites: SOCG 5321.

SOCG 5372 Black Sociology: 3 semester hours.

Examines the contributions of black sociological theorists, public intellectuals, and methodologists including but not limited to selected topics such as Black Marxism, the Atlanta Laboratory School, Postcolonial Studies, Black Feminism, and Critical Race Theory providing the foundation for contemporary theory.

SOCG 5382 Graduate Capstone: 3 semester hours.

Serves as the culminating experience for non-thesis MA students. This course will allow graduate students to develop writing and presentation skills, and integrate past learning.

SOCG 5383 Media Studies: 3 semester hours.

Explores how various avenues of the media impact human behavior with a focus on theory and themes such as: race, gender, class, culture, technology and globalization.

SOCG 5384 Urban Field Research: 3 semester hours.

The course is designed to provide theoretical foundations for and guided practical experience in conducting field research in urban settings.

SOCG 5399 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research, and/or field work on selected topics.