Department of Psychology

Courses

PSYC 0134 Math Skills Statistics: 1 semester hour.

This course will enhance the student’s performance in Fundamentals of Statistics. Itimproves skills in solving linear equations; graphing and interpreting linear models; and reading and applying formulas. It develops an understanding of numeracy and the real number system, including conversions between and calculations with fractions, decimals and percentages, necessary for successfully completing the Fundamental of Statistics course. A co-requisite course for those students who have not passed TSIA Math, to be taken in conjunction with Fundamental of Statistics.
Co-requisite: PSYC 2317.

PSYC 1141 Careers in Psychology: 1 semester hour.

This course is designed to provide students with knowledge of different careers one can pursue in psychology.

PSYC 2301 General Psychology: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to fundamental psychological concepts derived from the application of scientific method to the study of behavior.

PSYC 2308 Child Psychology: 3 semester hours.

This course surveys the content, theories and methods used by developmental psychologists to study child and adolescent development. Topics covered will include conception, genetics, prenatal development and physical, motor, perceptual and social development from infancy to early adolescence. Theories of social and cognitive development will be covered.
Prerequisites: PSYC 2301 or PSYC 1113.

PSYC 2316 Psychology of Personality: 3 semester hours.

Personality theories, major concepts, methods and problems in the field of psychology. Analysis of theories of personality, with emphasis on personality development in the normal population. Evaluation of theories in the field of psychology. The development of personality as a pattern of strivings manifested in interpersonal relations. The coverage of constitutional, psychological, social and cultural factors in the development and adjustment of the normal individual.

PSYC 2317 Statistical Methods in Psychology: 3 semester hours.

Introduces basic statistical concepts and the relevance of statistics in the every day life. Explores the fundamentals of descriptive statistics, elementary probability and sampling methods, and distributions. The student will be introduced to computer applications such as Statistical Package for the Social Sciences.

PSYC 3322 Abnormal Psychology: 3 semester hours.

Disorders in personality and behavior are emphasized. Examines organic and functional types of psychological abnormality. Some emphasis is given to the ways in which personality may become disordered. Evidence and theories on causation are considered together with the challenges of treatment.

PSYC 3324 Testing: 3 semester hours.

Study of human learning with particular attention to applications in the classroom. Includes laboratory experience in the use of the standardized school tests and practice in devising teacher-made tests. Emphasis is on original research literature and on individual projects.
Prerequisites: PSYC 2317 or PSYC 2613.

PSYC 3325 Clinical Psychology: 3 semester hours.

A survey of counseling and interview techniques and use of psychological test findings in support of counseling procedures.
Prerequisites: PSYC 1113 or PSYC 2301.

PSYC 3331 Psychology of Learning: 3 semester hours.

This course will introduce you to the experimental analysis of learning and behavior. This course will examine the importance of basic learning mechanisms in understanding animal and human behavior, as well as the application of learning theory to real-world examples, will be stressed.
Prerequisites: PSYC 2301 or PSYC 1113.

PSYC 3332 Social Psychology: 3 semester hours.

This course provides students with a survey of the topics covering the social bases of behavior. This course will examine some of the historical and philosophical foundations of social psychology, as well as theories and models of various social phenomena.
Prerequisites: PSYC 2301.

PSYC 3341 Drugs and Behavior: 3 semester hours.

This course covers the basic principles of psychopharmacology: what drugs are and how they influence psychological phenomena. Various forms of drug use and abuse are examined. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to understand how and why drugs are used for treatment for psychopathological and neuropsychological conditions; mechanisms of addiction; tolerance and abuse; the social recreational and religious context; and the history of substance abuse.
Prerequisites: PSYC 1311 or PSYC 1113.

PSYC 3343 Experimental Psychology: 3 semester hours.

Principles of experimental design, evaluation of research procedures, training in the use of standard apparatus, and repetition and extension of selected classical experiments in psychology. Only courses passed with grades of "C" or higher may be applied to hours constituting major requirements and psychology electives.
Prerequisites: PSYC 2317 or PSYC 2613.

PSYC 3354 Hist Sys Psyc: 3 semester hours.

A survey of the theories and research paradigms comprised of the foundations of psychology and the impact of culture on practice and theory.

PSYC 3360 Health Psychology: 3 semester hours.

This course will examine the theoretical and research foundations of behavioral health and illness from a biopsychosocial perspective. Students will be introduced to different medical disorders and diseases and the implications for the psychological health and impact on psychological functioning of individuals with these disorders.

PSYC 3361 Stat For Psyc II: 3 semester hours.

Applies statistical techniques in the field of psychology. Covers the use of large and small samples for statistical inference, linear and multiple regression, time series models and forecasting, nonparametric methods, the chi square test for cell probabilities, and contingency tables. Statistical packages for the social sciences will be studied in depth.
Prerequisites: PSYC 2317 or PSYC 2613.

PSYC 3362 Community Psychology: 3 semester hours.

This course provides an introduction to the field of community psychology. Community psychologists study person-environment interactions and the various ways individuals navigate between different social context, e.g. schools, neighborhood, community, and society; and, community psychologists employ a variety of methodological approaches to understand many of the social issues facing communities today such as juvenile violence, homelessness, HIV-AIDS, domestic violence, etc.
Prerequisites: PSYC 1311 or PSYC 1113.

PSYC 3364 Positive Psychology: 3 semester hours.

Positive psychology encompasses the study of positive experiences, positive character strengths, positive relationships, and the institutions and practices that facilitate their development. Positive experiences include the mental states of flow and mindfulness and emotions about the present (pleasure, contentment, laughter), past (e.g., nostalgia, satisfaction, pride), and future (e.g., hope, optimism). The positive character traits include wisdom, courage, compassion, love, humanity, justice, temperance, self-efficacy, resilience, grit, creativity, and spirituality/transcendence. The classification of these virtues is explored. Positive relationships include the factors that enhance meaning and well-being among couples, family, friends, co-workers, and the community. Positive institutions are exemplified by positive education, positive work environments, healthy families, humane leadership, and the development of civic virtues.This course also reviews the history of positive psychology and the contributions this new field has made to several traditional research areas in psychology. Consideration will be given to conflicting viewpoints and their respective empirical support, including the benefits of balancing positive with negative emotions, the measurement and development of happiness, and the implications of deliberately attempting to increase it. Throughout the course we will also engage in experiential learning and practical exercises to increase well-being, which will inform our theoretical and empirical understanding of important questions in positive psychology.
Prerequisites: PSYC 1311 or PSYC 1113.

PSYC 3370 Introduction to Forensic Psychology: 3 semester hours.

The course will focus on general principles and applications of forensic psychology. Students will gain an understanding of how research and theory can deepen understanding of participants and basic psychological processes in the legal system.

PSYC 3372 Psychology and Law: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed to provide an in-depth review of psychology and law with an emphasis on how psychological science has informed various practices in the legal system and the role of psychologists in the legal system. Topics of inquiry include family law, mental health evaluations, legal decision-making, the insanity defense, the death penalty, civil commitment, police investigations, interrogations and confessions, and eyewitness testimony.
Prerequisites: PSYC 1113 or PSYC 2301.

PSYC 3391 Indust Org Psyc: 3 semester hours.

A survey of the development and application of psychological principles related to the workplace environment to include leadership, motivation, industrial and organizational influences on behavior drawing upon research methods and major theories.

PSYC 4141 Psychology Internship Supervision: 1 semester hour.

The Internship Course aims to provide students with an opportunity to acquire field experience with emphasis on psychological constructs and methodologies across diverse settings such as mental health services, community organizations, criminal justice venues, and business enterprises.
Prerequisites: (PSYC 2301 or PSYC 1113) and (PSYC 2316 or PSYC 2513) and (PSYC 2317 or PSYC 2613) and (PSYC 3343 or PSYC 3433).
Co-requisite: PSYC 3322.

PSYC 4322 Abnormal Psychology: 3 semester hours.

Disorders in personality and behavior are emphasized. Examines organic and functional types of psychological abnormality. Some emphasis is given to the ways in which personality may become disordered. Evidence and theories on causation are considered together with the challenges of treatment.
Prerequisites: PSYC 1113 or PSYC 2301.

PSYC 4323 Psychology of Religion: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed to provide an in-depth review of psychology-of-religion theory and research. The required text provides a state-of-the-art review of classic theory and contemporary empirical research.
Prerequisites: PSYC 1311 or PSYC 1113.

PSYC 4325 Clinical Psychology: 3 semester hours.

A survey of counseling and interview techniques and use of psychological test findings in support of counseling procedures.

PSYC 4333 Special Topics in Psychology: 3 semester hours.

The study of specialized areas in Psychology. Topics vary by semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic varies.

PSYC 4341 Psychology Internship: 1-3 semester hour.

The Internship Course aims to provide students with an opportunity to acquire field experience with emphasis on psychological constructs and methodologies across diverse settings such as mental health services, community organizations, criminal justice venues, and business enterprises.
Prerequisites: (PSYC 2301 or PSYC 1113) and (PSYC 2316 or PSYC 2513) and (PSYC 2317 or PSYC 2613) and (PSYC 3343 or PSYC 3433).
Co-requisite: PSYC 3322.

PSYC 4343 Multicultural Psychology: 3 semester hours.

This course is an introduction to the principles, theories, and applications of multiculturalism. Students will be required to examine one’s own sense of self and others’ identity, beliefs and assumptions, and behaviors. Theories, research, and skills will be explored so that students can acquire the necessary multicultural competencies for effective work with children and adolescents from diverse backgrounds (i.e., culture, race, ethnicity, class, & gender) in multicultural environments (i.e., public schools, community organizations).
Prerequisites: PSYC 1311 or PSYC 1113.

PSYC 4344 Research Methods: 3 semester hours.

Work in designing and carrying on research projects both in laboratory and in more life-like situations. The use and understanding of appropriate statistical procedures are emphasized.
Prerequisites: PSYC 2317 or PSYC 2613.

PSYC 4351 Cognitive Psychology: 3 semester hours.

This course is an overview of the theoretical and empirical aspects of cognition as they apply to knowledge acquisition, storage, transformation and use. Areas of study include visual and auditory recognition; attention and consciousness; working and long-term memory; mental imagery; language acquisition, production and comprehension and problem solving.
Prerequisites: PSYC 2301.
Co-requisite: PSYC 4361.

PSYC 4352 Emotion and Motivation: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed to provide an in-depth review of the psychology of emotion and motivation with an emphasis on theoretical and physiological approaches to understanding emotion and motivation through the applications of psychological science Topics include the origin of motivations and emotions, structures associated in the brain, functions of emotions and motivations, and current directions.
Prerequisites: PSYC 1113 or PSYC 2301.

PSYC 4353 Psychology of Sex and Gender: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed to provide students with knowledge about the origins and psychological effects of gender differences and sexual orientation.
Prerequisites: PSYC 1311 or PSYC 1113.

PSYC 4355 Social Cognition: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed to provide students with knowledge about important research from a social cognition perspective.
Prerequisites: PSYC 1311 or PSYC 1113.

PSYC 4361 Physiological Psychology: 3 semester hours.

Neurophysiologic correlates and systems underlying behavior. Physiological processes underlying sensory-motor activity, motivation and learning.

PSYC 4363 Sensation Perception: 3 semester hours.

Examines the sensory processes, the relationship between physical stimuli and sensory/perceptual experience, and perceptual phenomena.
Prerequisites: PSYC 4361.

PSYC 4364 Stereotypes and Prejudice: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed to provide students with knowledge about the origins and psychological effects of stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination. Students will also learn about interventions that reduce stereotyping and prejudice.
Prerequisites: PSYC 1311 or PSYC 1113.

PSYC 4373 Cross-Cultural Psychology: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed to provide students with knowledge about the effect of culture on psychological phenomenon. Topics include differences between individualistic and collectivistic cultures, as well as differences between culture of honor, dignity, and face.
Prerequisites: PSYC 1311 or PSYC 1113.

PSYC 4382 Reading and Research: 3 semester hours.

Offered when demand warrants. Seminar or projects on various topics in psychology.

PSYC 4383 African American Psychology: 3 semester hours.

African-American Psychology is designed to introduce advanced undergraduate students to the research, theories, and paradigms developed to understand the attitudes, behaviors, psychosocial and educational realities of African-American. In order to gain a more accurate understanding of the psychosocial realities of African-Americans it is essential to understand intersectionality.
Prerequisites: PSYC 1311 or PSYC 1113.

PSYC 4384 Senior Paper: 3 semester hours.

An in-depth study of a specific research topic in psychology. An oral presentation is a requirement of the course.
Prerequisites: (PSYC 2317 or PSYC 2613) and (PSYC 3343 or PSYC 3433) and (PSYC 3361 or PSYC 3613) and (PSYC 4344 or PSYC 4443).

PSYC 4391 Psychology Research: 1-3 semester hour.

This research course provides students with an opportunity to conduct faculty-supervised research in an area of mutual interest resulting in an opportunity to obtain hands-on research experience for undergraduate students, who intend to either pursue graduate degrees or employment.
Prerequisites: PSYC 2301 or PSYC 1113.

PSYC 4393 Chicano/Latinx Psychology: 3 semester hours.

This course will familiarize the student with the personal, social, cultural and institutional forces that affect Hispanics. The course will explore the sociopolitical issues that affect Chicano/Latinx and how they affect their psychological well-being.
Prerequisites: PSYC 1311 or PSYC 1113.

PSYC 4399 Independent Study: 1-3 semester hour.

Reading, research and/or field work on selected topics.

PSYC 4444 Research Methods: 4 semester hours.

Work in designing and carrying on research projects both in laboratory and in more life-like situations. The use and understanding of appropriate statistical procedures are emphasized.
Prerequisites: PSYC 1113 or PSYC 2301 and (PSYC 2613 or PSYC 2317).

PSYC 4484 Senior Paper: 4 semester hours.

An in-depth study of a specific research topic in psychology. An oral presentation is a requirement of the course.
Prerequisites: PSYC 1113 or PSYC 2301 and (PSYC 2613 or PSYC 2317) and (PSYC 4444).