Chemistry

Purpose and Goals: Chemistry and Physics Programs

The B.S. program in Chemistry is designed to provide deep understanding of scientific processes and principles, which will enable students to develop intellectually, culturally, socially and morally. It is further intended to provide a comprehensive foundation in all the major areas of Chemistry, while offering a good measure of flexibility. Through the execution of its function, the Department prepares students for careers in teaching, research, industry, and pre-professional training in Medicine, Dentistry and Allied health professions.

In July 2013, Texas Higher Educational Coordinating Board (THECB) approved a joint Bachelor of Science (BS) degree in Physics (CIP 40.0801.00) as part of Texas Physics Consortium (TPC) for the following universities: Prairie View A&M University; Tarleton State University; Texas A&M University-Corpus Christy; Texas A&M University-Kingsville; West Texas A&M University; Texas Southern University; and Mid Western State University.  This consortium undergraduate B.S. program in Physics provides a broad and solid background in fundamental physics from introductory to advanced course work. It also provides specialized educational preparation and training in several disciplines.

Academic Standards

Students must earn a minimum grade of a “C” in all classes taken in their major disciplines and a minimum grade of a “C” in all classes taken in their minor disciplines (if applicable).

Special Emphasis Concentrations - Chemistry

The Department of Chemistry offers a Bachelor of Science Degree with the following concentrations:

Traditional Chemistry: This program is designed for students who plan to be professional chemists, and to pursue graduate studies in chemistry.

Biomedical Science: This program is designed for students who plan additional study toward the M.D., D.D.S., or D.V.M. degrees. It is also suitable for students interested in medical or biomedical research as well as for those who plan to pursue a graduate degree in the biochemical or biomedical areas.

Forensic Science: This program is for students interested in career in crime laboratories, drug enforcement agency, food and drug administration, and other related agencies.

Special Focus Areas - Physics

The Physics program also provides opportunities for undergraduate students to pursue research at the frontiers of physics and for collaborations with other departments. The physics faculty members conduct research in areas that include novel materials and devices, nanostructures, high temperature superconductivity, high magnetic field phenomena, solar and space physics, radiation physics, medical imaging, geosciences and optical physics. These research projects provide an outstanding training environment for our undergraduate students.

The program offers several specialization focus areas that may be customized to the student’s interest and potential career of choice. Examples are: Traditional Physics (with 18 SCH of advanced courses in Physics or Physical Science), Computational Physics (with 23 SCH of courses from Computer Science), Applied Physics (with 23 SCH of courses from Electrical Engineering), and Medical Physics. Each student will work with an advisor and the program coordinator to develop an individual degree plan. All Physics majors must complete the core curriculum. Consult your advisor for a choice of courses within the core that would provide you with a better preparation for Physics and other professional programs.

Bachelor of Science in Chemistry Degree Program Requirements

Core Curriculum42
Departmental Requirements (Foreign Language Elective - one language)6
Major Requirements 136
General Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory I
General Inorganic Chemistry
General Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory
General Inorganic Chemistry
Quantitative Analysis
Quantitative Analysis Laboratory
General Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
General Organic Chemistry I
General Organic Chemistry Laboratory II
General Organic Chemistry II
Physical Chemistry
Physical Chemistry Laboratory
Biochemistry
Research
Instrumental Analysis
Support Area13
General Biology
Calculus with Analytic Geometry I
Calculus with Analytic Geometry II
Select one of the following concentrations from below23
Total Hours120
Traditional Chemistry Concentration
CHEM 3423Physical Chemistry3
CHEM 3432Physical Chemistry Laboratory2
CHEM 4001Journal Reading and Chemical Literature1
CHEM 4052Instrumental Analysis Laboratory2
CHEM 4061Research1
CHEM 4063Inorganic Chemistry3
MATH 3014Calculus III4
PHYS 2111General Physics Lab I1
PHYS 2121General Physics Lab II1
Restricted electives (Select 5 hours from the courses below:)5
Biology Seminar
Human Physiology and Anatomy
Human Physiology and Anatomy
General Microbiology
Special Topics in Chemistry w/revolving themes forensic science/emerging areas of interests in Chem
Forensic Chemistry
Biochemistry Laboratory
Total Hours23
Biomedical Science Concentration
BIOL 1025General Biology5
BIOL 3014Human Physiology and Anatomy4
MATH 2003Elementary Statistics3
PHYS 2111General Physics Lab I1
PHYS 2121General Physics Lab II1
Restricted Electives (Select 9 hours from the courses below):9
Biology Seminar
Genetics
Human Physiology and Anatomy
General Microbiology
Special Topics in Chemistry w/revolving themes forensic science/emerging areas of interests in Chem
Physical Chemistry
Physical Chemistry Laboratory
Journal Reading and Chemical Literature
Instrumental Analysis Laboratory
Research
Inorganic Chemistry
Total Hours23
Forensic Science Concentration
CHEM 4001Journal Reading and Chemical Literature1
CHEM 4023Forensic Chemistry 33
CHEM 4032Forensic Chemistry Laboratory2
CHEM 4063Inorganic Chemistry3
MATH 2003Elementary Statistics3
PHYS 2511University Physics Lab I1
PHYS 2521University Physics Lab II1
Restricted Electives (Select 9 hours form the following courses):9
Principles of Criminal Justice
Court Systems and Practices
Criminal Law I
Criminology
General Biology
Genetics
Human Physiology and Anatomy
Human Physiology and Anatomy
General Microbiology
Immunology
Molecular Biology I
Total Hours23
1

 Students majoring in Chemistry must earn a minimum grade of "C" in all classes taken in their major disciplines

2

 PHYS 2113 ,2123, 2513 and 2523 must be taken in the core

3

 A six week summer internship or externship in approved forensic laboratory or DEA Laboratory can be used to earn credit for CHEM 4032 by submitting a detailed report of laboratory techniques acquired during the externship

Requirements for Chemistry as a Minor

Students who select Chemistry as a minor must complete twenty-four semester credit hours from the following courses with a minimum grade of a "C":

Requirements for Chemistry Minors24
General Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory I
General Inorganic Chemistry
General Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory
General Inorganic Chemistry
Quantitative Analysis
Quantitative Analysis Laboratory
General Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
General Organic Chemistry I
General Organic Chemistry Laboratory II
General Organic Chemistry II
Physical Chemistry
Physical Chemistry
Journal Reading and Chemical Literature
Biochemistry
Biochemistry Laboratory
Research
Total Hours24

Purpose and Goals

The Department of Chemistry offers a program of advanced study that prepares graduate students for careers in research, teaching, or industry. Graduate training in the department is multifaceted and flexible, depending on the interests and needs of the student. The program includes coursework, seminars, teaching and/or research, experience, and writing of a thesis.

Admission Requirements

Students who plan to work toward the M.S. degree in chemistry must fulfill the following undergraduate requirements: two semesters of inorganic chemistry, one semester of analytical chemistry, two semesters of organic chemistry, and two semesters of physical chemistry. It is expected that the average grades in these chemistry courses and in related courses will not be less than a grade of “C”. A student whose overall GPA in graduate coursework falls below 3.0 on a 4.0 scale will be required to demonstrate improvement during the next enrollment or be discontinued in the program. The Department reserves the right to administer a qualifying examination to these students and to advise them on courses they can take to successfully complete the graduate degree.

Advancement to Candidacy

The Application for Candidacy Form must be approved by the department head, Dean of Arts and Sciences, and submitted to the Dean of the Graduate School for approval. Research projects for the thesis will be assigned before the student is approved as a candidate.

Master of Science in Chemistry Degree Program Requirements

It is recommended that students who plan to qualify for the M.S. Degree in Chemistry spend at least one year in residence and that those who plan to study during the summer periods plan to devote at least one summer to research. Below is a suggested outline of study for the various fields of chemistry. The outlines represent only the minimum requirements:

Each candidate is expected to successfully complete a minimum of 24 semester hours of course work exclusive of research.

Core Classes
CHEM 5322Instrumental Lab2
CHEM 5323Instrumental Analysis3
CHEM 5402Advanced Organic Chemistry2
CHEM 5534General Biochemistry4
Electives4
Select one from the following courses:
Microscopic Anatomy
Identification of Organic Compounds
Polymer Chemistry Laboratory
Polymer Chemistry
Thesis6
Select one concentration from below9
Total Hours30
Chemistry Concentration
CHEM 5313Advanced Analytical Chemistry3
CHEM 5613Advanced Inorganic Chemistry3
CHEM 5783Advanced Physical Chemistry3
Total Hours9
Chemical Biology Concentration
BIOL 5013Genomics3
BIOL 5063Micro Activ Toxico3
BIOL 5123Cell Biology3
Total Hours9

Bachelor of Science in Physics: Degree Program Requirements

Prairie View A&M University is a member of the Texas Physics Consortium (TPC) that offers a Joint BS Degree in Physics with member institutions collectively offering more than 24 SCH of advanced physics core courses via Trans Texas Video Network (TTVN).

To graduate with a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics, a minimum of 120 semester credit hours (SCH) are required, divided into three (3) categories of required course sequences: (i) Core Curriculum courses (42 SCH), (ii) Major courses (60 SCH), and (iii) Specialization (18 SCH). A minor may be chosen depending upon the student’s preference and career choice.

Core Curriculumn
ENGL 1123Freshman Composition I3
ENGL 1133Freshman Composition II3
MATH 1113College Algebra3
CHEM 1033General Inorganic Chemistry3
PHSC 1123Physical Science I3
Language, Philosophy, and Culture3
Creative Arts3
HIST 1313U.S. to 18763
HIST 1323U.S. 1876 to Present3
POSC 1113American Government3
POSC 1123Texas Government3
Social and Behavioral Sciences3
CPET 1013Computer Applications in Engineering Technology I3
COMM 1003Fundamentals of Speech Communication3
Major Required Courses
PHYS 2513University Physics I3
PHYS 2511University Physics Lab I1
PHYS 2523University Physics II3
PHYS 2521University Physics Lab II1
PHYS 3103Mechanics I3
PHYS 3123Electricity and Magnetism I3
PHYS 3163Mathematical Physics I3
PHYS 3183Modern Physics I3
PHYS 3243Introduction to Nuclear, Particle and Radiation Physics3
PHYS 4023Introductory Quantum Mechanics I3
PHYS 4063Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics I3
PHYS 4103Advanced Physics Lab3
PHYS 4911Physics Research Project1
PHYS 4921Physics Research Seminar1
MATH 1124Calculus with Analytic Geometry I4
MATH 2024Calculus with Analytic Geometry II4
MATH 2043Differential Equations3
MATH 3014Calculus III4
CHEM 1011Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory I1
PHSC 1121Sci Lab1
PHSC 2123Physical Science II3
Physics Electives: Select 6 hours from any 3000 or 4000 level Physics course from Approved TPC Courses6
Specialization - Select 18 hours from any discipline listed below, in consultation with your faculty advisor:18
Any PHYS, PHSC, MATH, CHEG, CPET, COMP, CVEG, GNEG, ELEG, ELET, OR MCEG
Total Hours120


Requirements for Physics as a Minor Field................................................................. 18 SCH

PHYS 2511-2521, PHYS 2513-2523, and 10 SCH of Physics Electives.

Honor Societies, Clubs, and Service Organizations

The William E. Reid Student Chapter of the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers (NOBCCHE) introduces students to the chemical professional environment in business, industry, government, and academia with special emphasis on the role of the minority chemist.

The student Affiliate Chapter of the American Chemical Society (ACS/SA) serves the dual role as departmental club and the avenue of participation to the chemical community. Chemistry majors and minors may become members of the ACS/SA upon recommendations of a member of the ACS.

Students who have had at least one course in physics above the elementary level and whose grade point averages are B or better are eligible for membership in Sigma Pi Sigma, the physics honor society. Students having an interest in physics may also join the Society of Physics Students, an organization dedicated to the promotion and advancement of physics throughout society.

Chemistry Courses

CHEM 1011 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory I: 1 semester hour.

A general laboratory course covering aspects of qualitative and quantitative analysis and determination of chemical and physical properties.
Prerequisites: CHEM 1013 (may be taken concurrently) or CHEM 1033 (may be taken concurrently) or MATH 1113 (may be taken concurrently).

CHEM 1013 General Inorganic Chemistry I: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed for non-majors and non-minors. This first semester course entails exploration of the fundamental concepts, laws and theory of chemistry through study of the states of matter. A descriptive view of the periodic chart, chemical properties, reactions, and chemical bonding theories and stoichiometry.
Prerequisites: MATH 1113.
Co-requisite: MATH 1113.

CHEM 1021 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory II: 1 semester hour.

The second semester continuation of CHEM 1011. A general laboratory course covering aspects of qualitative and quantitative analysis and determination of chemical and physical properties.
Prerequisites: MATH 1113 and (CHEM 1023 (may be taken concurrently) or CHEM 1043 (may be taken concurrently)).

CHEM 1023 General Inorganic Chemistry II: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed for non-majors and non-minors. This second semester course includes theories of acids, bases and salts. Elementary concepts of chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, equilibria, electrochemistry and redux reactions. An introduction to organic chemistry and selected topics.
Prerequisites: MATH 1113 and (CHEM 1013 or CHEM 1033).

CHEM 1032 General Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory I: 2 semester hours.

For students majoring or minoring in chemistry. A general laboratory course covering aspects of volumetric and gravimetric analysis, qualitative analysis, determination of chemical and physical properties, and chemical synthesis.
Prerequisites: MATH 1113 (may be taken concurrently).
Co-requisites: CHEM 1033, MATH 1113.

CHEM 1033 General Inorganic Chemistry: 3 semester hours.

For students majoring or minoring in chemistry. Theory of matter and concepts of measurement, atoms, molecules and ions. Stoichiometry and chemical calculations, reactions in aqueous solutions, kinetics of gases, thermo-chemistry, atomic structure, electron configurations and chemical bonds.
Prerequisites: MATH 1113.

CHEM 1034 Chemistry for Engineers: 4 semester hours.

Fundamental and Physical principles in chemistry, bonding, thermodynamics and kinetics with emphasis to engineering applications.
Prerequisites: CHEM 1033 or CHEM 1013.

CHEM 1042 General Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory: 2 semester hours.

For students majoring or minoring in chemistry. A continuation of CHEM 1032. General laboratory course covering aspects of volumetric, gravimetric and qualitative analyses; determination of chemical and physical properties, and chemical synthesis.
Prerequisites: MATH 1113.
Co-requisite: CHEM 1043.

CHEM 1043 General Inorganic Chemistry: 3 semester hours.

For students majoring or minoring in chemistry. A continuation of CHEM 1033. Bonding theory and molecular structure, intermolecular forces properties of solutions, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-based equilibria, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry and introduction to organic chemistry.
Prerequisites: MATH 1113 and CHEM 1033.

CHEM 1051 General Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory: 1 semester hour.

A laboratory course in general chemistry for students in the health sciences.
Prerequisites: CHEM 1053 (may be taken concurrently).

CHEM 1053 Introduction to General Chemistry: 3 semester hours.

An introductory course to essential chemical principles including atoms, atomic structure, molecules, compounds, elementary stoichiometry, and calculations, type of chemical reactions and fundamental principles. The interpretation and evaluation of case studies to develop fundamental knowledge and skills. This course will require a fair amount of writing and teamwork. For health science and nonmajors.

CHEM 1063 Survey of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry: 3 semester hours.

A course in general organic chemistry and biochemistry fro students in health sciences.
Prerequisites: CHEM 1053.

CHEM 2012 Quantitative Analysis: 2 semester hours.

Introduction to the principles and techniques of volumetric and gravimetric analysis employing modem instrumentation. Techniques include potentiometric, spectral-photometric, precipitation, electrochemical, and separation methods.
Prerequisites: CHEM 1033 and CHEM 1042 and CHEM 1043.

CHEM 2032 General Organic Chemistry Laboratory I: 2 semester hours.

A laboratory course including qualitative and quantitative investigations focusing on preparation and characterization of organic compounds.
Co-requisite: CHEM 2033.

CHEM 2033 General Organic Chemistry I: 3 semester hours.

For chemistry majors and minors, chemical engineering, and science majors. Electronic structure and bonding, introduction to organic compounds, reactions of alkenes, stereochemistry, reactions of alkynes, electron delocalization and resonance, reaction of dienes, substitution and elimination reactions.
Prerequisites: CHEM 1043.

CHEM 2042 General Organic Chemistry Laboratory II: 2 semester hours.

This is a continuation of CHEM 2032.
Co-requisite: CHEM 2043.

CHEM 2043 General Organic Chemistry II: 3 semester hours.

For chemistry majors and minors, chemical engineering, and science majors. A continuation of CHEM 2033. Substitution and elimination reactions, spectroscopic identification of organic compounds, reactions of substituted benzenes, reactions of carbonyl compounds, bioorganic compounds and special topics in organic chemistry.
Prerequisites: CHEM 2033.

CHEM 2112 Quantitative Analysis Laboratory: 2 semester hours.

This course is a continuation of the CHEM 2012.
Prerequisites: MATH 1113 and CHEM 1033 and CHEM 1043.

CHEM 3023 Special Topics in Chemistry w/revolving themes forensic science/emerging areas of interests in Chem: 3 semester hours.

Special Topics in Chemistry with revolving themes around forensic science and emerging areas of interests in Chemistry and Technology.
Prerequisites: CHEM 2043.

CHEM 3413 Physical Chemistry: 3 semester hours.

A rigorous treatment of thermodynamics (Laws), thermo-chemistry, application of thermodynamic laws to gases (ideal and real), chemical equilibria, ionic equilibria, and electrochemistry.
Prerequisites: CHEM 1043 and MATH 1124.

CHEM 3422 Physical Chemistry Laboratory: 2 semester hours.

A laboratory course including experimental studies in chemical thermodynamics, equilibria, chemical kinetics, transport properties, spectroscopy, and molecular structure.
Co-requisite: CHEM 3413.

CHEM 3423 Physical Chemistry: 3 semester hours.

A continuation of CHEM 3413. Rate processes, kinetic theory and transport properties of gasses and liquids. An introduction to the Fundamentals of Quantum mechanics and spectroscopy. Atomic and molecular structure. Electric and magnetic properties of molecules.
Prerequisites: MATH 2043 and CHEM 3413.

CHEM 3432 Physical Chemistry Laboratory: 2 semester hours.

This course is a continuation of CHEM 3422.
Co-requisite: CHEM 3423.

CHEM 4001 Journal Reading and Chemical Literature: 1 semester hour.

Initial instruction in the methodology and practice of efficient use of the chemical literature. Detailed study of recent developments in chemistry. Designed to develop and stimulate research attitudes.

CHEM 4023 Forensic Chemistry: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to forensic science, chemical evidence handling, analysis and drug classification. Sampling techniques in forensic chemistry.
Prerequisites: CHEM 2033 and CHEM 2043 and CHEM 2012 and CHEM 2112 and CHEM 3413 and CHEM 3422.
Co-requisite: CHEM 4033.

CHEM 4032 Forensic Chemistry Laboratory: 2 semester hours.

Drug identification and confirmatory tests using spectroscopic techniques that include HPLC, GC, ICP/ AES, FTIR. Sample handling and storage.
Prerequisites: CHEM 4053.

CHEM 4033 Biochemistry: 3 semester hours.

A study of the chemistry of biological molecules: proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and nucleic acids. Enzyme catalysis, Bioenergetics, Metabolism of carbohydrates, fats and proteins. Interrelationship of the metabolic pathways.
Prerequisites: CHEM 2033 and CHEM 2043.

CHEM 4042 Biochemistry Laboratory: 2 semester hours.

Experiments in basic methodology for the isolation, purification and characterization of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids and enzymes from natural products.
Prerequisites: CHEM 4033 (may be taken concurrently).
Co-requisite: CHEM 4033.

CHEM 4051 Research: 1 semester hour.

Library and laboratory work on selected problems.

CHEM 4052 Instrumental Analysis Laboratory: 2 semester hours.

Laboratory course that includes experimental applications of spectroscopy, electro-analytical methods, and chromatography.
Co-requisite: CHEM 4053.

CHEM 4053 Instrumental Analysis: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the theory and application of modern instrumentation and techniques to the analysis of chemical systems. Includes interpretive spectroscopy, computer-assigned experimentation, and the use of the chemical literature.
Prerequisites: CHEM 3413.

CHEM 4061 Research: 1 semester hour.

Library and laboratory work on selected problems.

CHEM 4063 Inorganic Chemistry: 3 semester hours.

Modern atomic theory and the Periodic System, valence and bonding. The constitution of inorganic compounds; coordination chemistry and ligand field theory. The chemistry of nonmetals including polyacids, peracids and hydrides. Reactions in non-aqueous systems. Some interstitial and nonstoichiometric compounds. Radioactivity and atomic integration.
Prerequisites: CHEM 3413.

CHEM 4993 Independent Study: 1-3 semester hour.

Readings, research, and/or field work on selected topics.

CHEM 5013 Research: 3 semester hours.

Problems for investigation may be selected from one of the following fields of Chemistry: 1. Analytical; 2. Biochemistry; 3. Inorganic; 4. Organic; and 5. Physical.

CHEM 5023 Research: 3 semester hours.

Problems for investigation may be selected from one of the following fields of Chemistry: 1. Analytical; 2. Biochemistry; 3. Inorganic; 4. Organic; and 5. Physical.

CHEM 5026 Research: 6 semester hours.

Problems for investigation may be selected from one of the following fields of chemistry: 1. Analytical; 2. Biochemistry; 3. Inorganic; 4. Organic; and 5. Physical.

CHEM 5313 Advanced Analytical Chemistry: 3 semester hours.

Fundamental principles and investigation of chemical reactions as they relate to application of classical and modern instrumental methods. Focuses on the processes occurring in sampling, separation and quantitative measurement emphasizing chemical concepts.
Prerequisites: CHEM 5783.

CHEM 5322 Instrumental Lab: 2 semester hours.

An integrated laboratory that uses modern instrumentation to analyze complex chemical systems. Theories and principles encountered in CHEM 5313 and CHEM 5323 will provide the basis for bulk, surface, and interfacial analysis at the atomic and molecular levels.
Prerequisites: CHEM 5313 and CHEM 5323.

CHEM 5323 Instrumental Analysis: 3 semester hours.

Fundamental principles and theories underlying modern instrumental methods and techniques for analysis of complex systems. Atomic and molecular level characterization of surfaces, interfaces, and bulk systems will be emphasized.
Prerequisites: CHEM 5783.

CHEM 5402 Advanced Organic Chemistry: 2 semester hours.

A review of elementary Organic Chemistry with an extension of more advanced topics. Includes assigned subject materials.

CHEM 5414 Identification of Organic Compounds: 4 semester hours.

The separation and identification of pure organic compounds and mixtures.

CHEM 5442 Polymer Chemistry Laboratory: 2 semester hours.

A laboratory course in polymer chemistry focusing on characterization and synthesis of polymers and copolymer systems.

CHEM 5443 Polymer Chemistry: 3 semester hours.

Presentation of polymer concepts including polymerization and copolymerization processes, nomenclature, classifications, stereochemistry, structure-property relationships and morphology.

CHEM 5534 General Biochemistry: 4 semester hours.

A basic and extension course designed for graduate students planning to major or minor in Biochemistry or related fields and who require more than an elementary knowledge of the subject.

CHEM 5613 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry: 3 semester hours.

Consideration of important aspects of modern inorganic chemistry. Application of thermodynamics and kinetics in inorganic chemistry; practical and potential applications of inorganic systems.

CHEM 5783 Advanced Physical Chemistry: 3 semester hours.

A lecture course dealing with advanced topics of special interest in modern physical chemistry in areas including experimental and theoretical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, collision and transition state theories, atomic and molecular spectra, quantum mechanical systems, photochemistry, structure of crystals and liquids, surface chemistry, macro-molecules, and gas phase reactions.

CHEM 5993 Independent Study: 1-3 semester hour.

Individual studies in advanced chemistry, reading, literature research/analysis/problem solving/writing research reports on selected topics in advanced chemistry.

Physical Science Courses

PHSC 1121 Sci Lab: 1 semester hour.

Physical science laboratory course designed to enhance knowledge of basic principles of physical science and physical processes in our environment. Selected topics on physics, chemistry, astronomy, meteorology and geology will be emphasized with attention directed to current applications and discoveries.

PHSC 1123 Physical Science I: 3 semester hours.

Emphasizes insight into basic physical science principles and practices. Topics include physics, chemistry, and earth science aspect dealing with the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere.

PHSC 2123 Physical Science II: 3 semester hours.

An interdisciplinary examination of the physical and biological sciences. The course helps students understand how quantitative tools are used in modern scientific discovery. The course includes basic concepts of mechanics, chemistry, and astronomy.
Prerequisites: PHSC 1123.

PHSC 3083 Science of Everyday: 3 semester hours.

A description of daily phenomena, demonstrating how science provides a basis for comprehending them and discusses relationships between various apparently unrelated phenomena.

PHSC 3183 MOD PHYS SCI Teacher: 3 semester hours.

Emphasizes insight into Modern Physics with an introduction to the physics of the 20th century with developments of the 21st century included.

PHSC 3223 Introduction to Atmospheric Science: 3 semester hours.

Structure of the atmosphere. Physical and chemical phenomena leading to atmospheric changes. Weather patterns and climate control. On-line Weather Studies course is included.

PHSC 4011 Earth Science Lab: 1 semester hour.

Laboratory to support PHSC 4013. Exercises include: classification of minerals and rock types; water testing and analysis; field work. Also covered will be online weather studies, analysis and interpretation of real-time meteorological data.

PHSC 4013 Earth Science: 3 semester hours.

Designed for science teachers in junior and senior high schools. It covers basic concepts of earth science and methods of teaching. The content covers a study of geology, meteorology, hydrology, petrology, and mineralogy. A study analysis and evaluation of some of the recent systems and techniques in the teaching of earth science. Elements from Online Weather Studies course are included.
Prerequisites: PHSC 1123.
Co-requisite: PHSC 4011.

PHSC 4024 Astronomy and Geology: 4 semester hours.

An introduction to earth science concepts with a more advanced approach involving research materials, including astronomy, geology, paleontology, and field experiences as content materials.

PHSC 4993 Independent Study: 1-3 semester hour.

Readings, research, and/or field work on selected topics.

Physics Courses

PHYS 1001 Physics as a Profession: 1 semester hour.

Introductory course in physics. Seminars and lectures on physics as a discipline, relationship of physics to other disciplines.

PHYS 2111 General Physics Lab I: 1 semester hour.

General physics laboratory on concepts of mechanics to include experiments on measurement, vectors-force table, air track, projectile motion, static and kinetic friction, ballistic pendulum, centripetal force, moment of inertia, Hooke's law and simple harmonic motion, standing waves and sound.

PHYS 2113 General Physics I: 3 semester hours.

An algebra and trigonometry based introduction to general physics with topics to include measurement system, motion, vector addition, Newton's laws of motion, statics, dynamics, mechanical energy, gravitation, momentum, circular and angular motion, and torque.
Prerequisites: MATH 1113 or MATH 1115 or MATH 1123.

PHYS 2121 General Physics Lab II: 1 semester hour.

General physics laboratory to include experiments on determination of absolute zero, linear expansion, calorimetry, force of static electricity, Ohm's Law, color-coded resistors, resistors in series and parallel, RC-series transient circuit, RLC-series circuit, AC circuits, concave and convex lenses, and diffraction gratings.

PHYS 2123 General Physics II: 3 semester hours.

A continuation of algebra and trigonometry based General Physics I course includes sound, heat, electricity, magnetism, and optics.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2113 or PHYS 2513.

PHYS 2511 University Physics Lab I: 1 semester hour.

Calculus-based physics laboratory on concepts of mechanics to include experiments on measurement, vectors-force table, air track, projectile motion, static and kinetic friction, ballistic pendulum, centripetal force, moment of inertia, Hooke's law and simple harmonic motion, standing waves and sound.

PHYS 2513 University Physics I: 3 semester hours.

A calculus-based introductory physics course for science and engineering students. Course includes measurement, Newton's laws of motion statics, dynamics, mechanical energy, momentum, circular motion, and selected topics from torque, modules, Newton universal law, and fluid mechanics.
Prerequisites: MATH 1124.

PHYS 2521 University Physics Lab II: 1 semester hour.

Calculus-based physics laboratory to include experiments on determination of absolute zero, linear expansion, calorimetry, string standing waves, sound resonance, force of static electricity, Ohm's Law, color-coded resistors, resistors in series and parallel. RC-series transient circuit, RLC-series circuit, AC circuits, concave and convex lenses, and diffraction gratings.

PHYS 2523 University Physics II: 3 semester hours.

A continuation of PHYS 2513, a calculus-based introductory physics course for science and engineering students. Course includes electricity, magnetism, and selected topics from , sound and light.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2513 and MATH 2024.

PHYS 3003 Physics Research Internship: 3 semester hours.

Internship for undergraduate majors in physics and for majors in applied physics related disciplines who are engaged in research/co-op in governmental or industrial labs.

PHYS 3073 Optics: 3 semester hours.

Course on geometrical optics, ray tracing, plane surfaces, spherical surfaces, thin lenses, thick lenses, mirrors, stops, lens aberrations, optical instruments, wave optics, interference, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, diffraction grating, speed of light measurements, absorption and scattering, polarization, etc.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2123 or PHYS 2523.

PHYS 3103 Mechanics I: 3 semester hours.

The course content includes elements of vector analysis, rectilinear motion of a particle, Newton's laws, damped and forced harmonic motion, Fourier series, motion of a particle in three dimensions, rotating coordinate systems, gravitation, central force motion.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2523.

PHYS 3113 Mechanics II: 3 semester hours.

A continuation of PHYS 3103. The course content includes motion of systems of particles, center of mass and moment of inertia of rigid bodies, moments and products of inertia, principal axes, Euler's equations, Lagrangian mechanics, coupled harmonic oscillators and normal coordinates, theory of vibrating systems.
Prerequisites: PHYS 3103.

PHYS 3123 Electricity and Magnetism I: 3 semester hours.

Basic theory of electrostatics; Coulomb's Law, Gauss's Theorem, simple potential theory, LaPlace's and Poisson's equations. Calculation of electric fields and potentials for point and continuous charge distributions. Computer-based demonstrations are included.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2523.

PHYS 3133 Electricity and Magnetism II: 3 semester hours.

A continuation of PHYS 3123. Theory of metallic conduction of electricity. Ohm's Law, Kirchoff's Law, electromagnetic induction, Maxwell's Equations, A.C. circuits and electromagnetic radiation; appropriate demonstrations to complement the theory. Computer-based demonstrations are included.
Prerequisites: PHYS 3123.

PHYS 3163 Mathematical Physics I: 3 semester hours.

Advanced mathematics for physicists and engineers; vector analysis, curvilinear coordinates, tensor analysis, matrices and determinants, infinite series, functions of a complex variable. Emphasis throughout is on practical applications of theory and techniques as applied to problems in physics and engineering. Computer programs such as Mathematica and MAT LAB will be used.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2523.

PHYS 3173 Mathematical Physics II: 3 semester hours.

A continuation of PHYS 3163. Course topics include second-order differential equations, orthogonal functions, Fourier series and integrals, gamma functions, La Place transforms, Bessel special functions, Greens functions, calculus of variations. Computer programs such as Mathematica and MAT LAB will be used.
Prerequisites: PHYS 3163.

PHYS 3183 Modern Physics I: 3 semester hours.

Course content includes relativity, wave-particle duality, atomic structure, quantum mechanics, and quantum theory of the hydrogen atom.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2523.

PHYS 3193 Modern Physics II: 3 semester hours.

A continuation of PHYS 3183 to include many-electron atoms, molecules, statistical mechanics, the solid state, the atomic nucleus, radioactivity, nuclear reactions, elementary particles.
Prerequisites: PHYS 3183.

PHYS 3243 Introduction to Nuclear, Particle and Radiation Physics: 3 semester hours.

Nuclear models, nuclear reactions, fundamentals of particle physics, classification of radiation particles, radiation transport, radiation scattering, radiation decay, radiation measurement, and radiation effects.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2523.

PHYS 3323 Physics of Medical Imaging: 3 semester hours.

Provides an introduction to physics of imaging relevant to medical applications, including image storage analysis, compression, and retrieval. Computer applications including vision and visualization concepts for medical applications. Telemedicine applications.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2523.

PHYS 4023 Introductory Quantum Mechanics I: 3 semester hours.

Inadequacy of classical mechanics, wave-particle duality, wave function, uncertainty relation, Schrodinger equation, expectation values, operator formalism, measurement, the correspondence principle, etc.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2523.

PHYS 4033 Introductory Quantum Mechanics II: 3 semester hours.

A continuation of PHYS 4023. Exclusion principle, angular momentum, central forces, matrix representations of wave functions and operators, spin, eigenvalue equations, perturbation theory, Zeeman effect, quantum-statistical mechanics, etc.
Prerequisites: PHYS 4023.

PHYS 4043 Astronomy and Astrophysics: 3 semester hours.

An intermediate level Physics/Physical Science course including Kepler's laws, law of gravitation, earth, moon, solar system, sun stars, stellar evolution, nucleo-synthesis, quarks to quasars, pulsars, nebulae, black holes, orbital transfers, cosmology. Simulation programs will be used.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2523.

PHYS 4063 Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics I: 3 semester hours.

Macroscopic thermodynamic systems, kinetic theory, black body radiation, classical and quantum statistical mechanics to include Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein, and Fermi-Dirac Statistics.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2523 and PHYS 2123.

PHYS 4073 Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics II: 3 semester hours.

A continuation of PHYS 4063 to include quantum statistical mechanics, approximate methods, master equation, phase transitions, Ising model, Onsager solution, Landau theory, Mean-Field theory, block spin and renormalization group approaches.
Prerequisites: PHYS 4063.

PHYS 4103 Advanced Physics Lab: 3 semester hours.

Computational physics modeling and simulations; several types of physics problem modeled and solved; software including Mathematica, MA TLAB, Numerical Recipes, Electronics Workbench, will be utilized.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2523.

PHYS 4473 Senior Research Project: 3 semester hours.

Capstone Team Based Project. Covers integrated project team concepts, ethics, responsibility, fiscal aspects, culminating in a comprehensive report and a presentation.

PHYS 4993 Independent Study: 1-3 semester hour.

Readings, research, and/or field work on selected topics.