Army Reserve Officers Training Corps

Purpose and Goals

The mission of the Army ROTC program is to prepare college students for professional careers as United States Army Officers. The faculty and staff in the department are dedicated military and civilian personnel committed to producing the highest caliber leaders for the nation.

The experience and training provided by Army ROTC separates ROTC graduates from their peers. Army ROTC Cadets are taught to be leaders and are provided hands-on experience in managing physical, financial, and human resources. Our cadets often possess a higher level of self-confidence and superior decision-making skills. The challenge of developing leaders to manage resources and command units equipped with state-of-the-art equipment forms the basic foundation of the military science curriculum.

Qualified students interested in earning a commission are encouraged to apply for an Army ROTC Scholarship. In addition to tuition, the scholarship pays educational fees, provides $1200 for books per year and provides the cadet a $300-$500 stipend for each month of the school year. Scholarships are available for two, three, and four year periods.

The four-year Army ROTC program is divided into two phases: the Basic Course and the Advanced Course. The Basic Course is taken during the first two years of college and is offered with no military obligation. It covers topics such as leadership development, individual military skills, and military customs/traditions. A student who demonstrates the potential to become army officers and who meet the physical and scholastic standards are eligible to enroll in the Advanced Course. It covers the final two years of college and includes a five-week course held during the summer between the junior and senior years. Cadets receive instruction in management, tactics, professionalism, ethics, and advanced leadership skills. While enrolled in this course, a cadet receives a stipend ranging from $300-$500 per month for up to 10 months of the school year and approximately $900 for attending the Cadet Leadership Course (CLC).

Commissioning Program

Completion of Army ROTC qualifies the student for a commission as a second lieutenant in the United States Army and a minor in Military Science.

Special Emphasis Options

Cadets enrolled in Advanced Army ROTC are required to complete a Professional Military Education (PME) component consisting of three essential parts: a baccalaureate degree: Army ROTC Advanced Courses Program and American Military History Course. Credits received through Army ROTC may be included as a part of their individual academic degree program.

Military science students may select military science courses as free electives.

Army ROTC cadets are required to participate in physical training (calisthenics) periods, as well as field-training exercises as part of the leadership laboratory.

Prior Service or JROTC experience

Students with a good record of prior military service or with four years of Junior ROTC experience may receive constructive credit for the basic course and may be allowed to enroll in the advanced course. Students with such experience and who are interested in enrolling should contact the Professor of Military Science prior to the start of their sophomore year.

Internship: Leader’s Training Course

Students without any prior military service may receive constructive credit for the basic course by attending and successfully completing a summer internship called the Cadet Intial Entry Training (CIET) at Fort Knox, Kentucky. The internship is a four-week training program conducted during the summer months and is designed to orient students to the U.S. Army. The training develops and evaluates their officer leadership potential, and qualifies them for enrollment in the ROTC Advanced Course program. The student graduates from the summer internship with increased confidence, self-discipline and decisiveness developed through physical and academic challenges. Participants will receive approximately $900 for the internship. Students not enrolled in ROTC and who have completed a minimum of sixty credit (60) hours may attend the Leader’s Training Course. Students who successfully complete the training can receive four (4) hours of constructive credit and qualify for an Army ROTC two-year scholarship.

Extra Curricular Activities

The Panther Battalion has its own Ranger Challenge Team, a varsity-level team that competes against other universities in military skills events.

The department periodically sponsors other activities including; rappelling demonstrations, ranger weekends, road marches, leadership exercises, adventure training, land navigation exercises, patrolling, and survival skills training.

Military science students may substitute the following courses for one semester hour of physical education activity requirements in the general education program:

ARMY 1171Leadership Laboratory I1
ARMY 1181Leadership Laboratory II1
ARMY 2271Leadership Laboratory III1
ARMY 2281Leadership Laboratory IV1
ARMY 3371Leadership Laboratory V1
ARMY 3381Leadership Laboratory VI1
ARMY 4471Leadership Laboratory VII1
ARMY 4481Leadership Laboratory VIII1

Advanced Course Admission Requirements

Prerequisites: Students must complete the basic course (ARMY 1111, ARMY 1121, ARMY 1171-ARMY 1181, ARMY 2203 (May substitute HIST 1313 or HIST 1323) and ARMY 2271-2281) or receive constructive credit prior to enrolling in the advanced course (ARMY 3313, ARMY 3371, ARMY 3323, ARMY 3381, ARMY 4413,ARMY 4423, ARMY 4471, and ARMY 4481). Students with prior military service or four years of JROTC experience may be eligible for constructive credits and advanced placement.

Course Prerequisites
ARMY 3313ARMY 1111, ARMY 1121, ARMY 1171-1181, ARMY 2212, ARMY 2222, and ARMY 2271-2281, completion of the Leadership Training Course (LTC); prior service or have completed four years of junior ROTC in high school.
ARMY 4413ARMY 3313, ARMY 3371, ARMY 3323, ARMY 3381

Commissioning Program Requirements

A cadet must satisfy the following requirements in order to be commissioned:

Complete or receive constructive credit for 16 hours of Military Science courses.

Option 1. Four-year Program (Students entering ROTC program as freshmen:

Military Science Courses26
Satisfactorily complete Cadet Leadership Course
Demonstrate proficiency in military history.
Military History (May substitute HIST 1313 or HIST 1323)
Total Hours26

Option 2. Two-year Program (Students entering the ROTC program as juniors):

Complete Summer Internship Program (Cadet Initial Entry Training)
Military Science Courses16
ARMY 2203Military History (May substitute HIST 1313 or HIST 1323)3

Option 3. Prior Service or Junior ROTC Program:

Military Science Courses16
Satisfactorily complete Cadet Leadership Course
Demonstrate proficiency in military history.
ARMY 2203Military History (May substitute HIST 1313 or HIST 1323)3

Minor Field Requirements

Receive a minimum grade of “C” in all Military Science Courses.

ARMY 3313Principles and Techniques of Leadership and Management3
ARMY 3323Leadership Skills and Small Unit Tactics3
ARMY 3371Leadership Laboratory V1
ARMY 3381Leadership Laboratory VI1
ARMY 4413Leadership and Management I3
ARMY 4423Leadership and Management II3
ARMY 4471Leadership Laboratory VII1
ARMY 4481Leadership Laboratory VIII1
Total Hours16

Military Science Curriculum

Freshman
Fall - Semester 1HoursSpring - Semester 2Hours
ARMY 11111ARMY 11211
ARMY 11711ARMY 11811
Total2Total2
Sophomore
Fall - Semester 1HoursSpring - Semester 2Hours
ARMY 22122ARMY 22222
ARMY 22711ARMY 22811
ARMY 22033Summer Session 
Total6Total3
Junior
Fall - Semester 1HoursSpring - Semester 2Hours
ARMY 33133ARMY 33233
ARMY 33711ARMY 33811
Total4Total4
Senior
Fall - Semester 1HoursSpring - Semester 2Hours
ARMY 44133ARMY 44233
ARMY 44711ARMY 44811
Total4Total4
Total Hours: 29

Courses

ARMY 1111 Foundations of Officership I: 1 semester hour.

Instills awareness of the role that ROTC plays in developing leaders. Students receive introductory seminar on the purpose, role, organization, and mission of the U.S. Army. Basic military skills are developed while providing students with skills and strategies that enable them to make successful transitions to university life.

ARMY 1121 Foundations of Officership II: 1 semester hour.

Instills awareness of the role that ROTC plays in developing leaders. Students receive introductory seminar on the purpose, role, organization, and mission of the U.S. Army. Basic military skills are developed while providing students with skills and strategies that enable them to make successful transitions to university life.

ARMY 1131 Enhanced Eng/Writ: 1 semester hour.

Emphasizes the fundamentals of writing skills. Includes the use of the active voice, clear, and concise writing. Provides practical exercises in developing syntactic writing assignments related.

ARMY 1141 Read/Cognitive: 1 semester hour.

Considers reason-consequence, premise-conclusion, general-specific classification of written ideas, problem-solving methods, verbal reasoning problems, analogies, analysis of trends & patterns, and vocabulary development.

ARMY 1151 Army Enhanced Math: 1 semester hour.

Provides practical, mathematical experiences in arithmetic, elementary algebra and geometry as they relate to maps, graphs, charts, and verbal problems/military related examples.

ARMY 1171 Leadership Laboratory I: 1 semester hour.

Considers the fundamentals of leadership. Provides practical exercise in command, organization, and control of small elements, together with physical fitness, using U.S. Army Physical Readiness Training as a model.

ARMY 1181 Leadership Laboratory II: 1 semester hour.

Considers the fundamentals of leadership. Provides practical exercise in command, organization, and control of small elements, together with physical fitness, using U.S. Army Physical Readiness Training as a model.

ARMY 2203 Military History: 3 semester hours.

Provides a historical perspective to decisions made by American military leaders. The course covers major military engagements from the colonial period through the current operating environment. Students will examine how military leaders motivated their men, devised battle strategies, implemented rules of engagement, managed supplies, managed transportation assets as well as logistics for their troops.

ARMY 2212 Individual Leadership Studies and Team Work I: 2 semester hours.

Enhances basic individual skills, while emphasizing small-unit team building. Develops student leadership potential through study and application of principles and techniques of leadership in a military environment. Topics covered include communications, map reading and land navigation, survival techniques, and customs and laws of war.
Prerequisites: ARMY 1111 and ARMY 1121.

ARMY 2222 Individual Leadership Studies and Team Work II: 2 semester hours.

Studies principle in small-unit management, tactics, operations and leadership. Develops students' self-confidence in their leadership ability through progressive application of knowledge, decision making, communication and control.
Prerequisites: ARMY 2212.

ARMY 2271 Leadership Laboratory III: 1 semester hour.

Considers the fundamentals of leadership. Provides practical exercise in command, organization, and control of small elements, together with physical fitness, using U.S. Army Readiness Training as a model.

ARMY 2281 Leadership Laboratory IV: 1 semester hour.

Considers the fundamentals of leadership. Provides practical exercise in command, organization, and control of small elements, together with physical fitness, using U.S. Army Readiness Training as a model.

ARMY 3313 Principles and Techniques of Leadership and Management: 3 semester hours.

Studies leadership techniques and tactical operations at the small-unit level. An induction to the basic team/squad tactical employment. Instruction covers operation orders, troop leading procedures, and squad movement techniques. Individual skills in map reading, land navigation, basic rifle marksmanship and physical fitness are emphasized.
Prerequisites: ARMY 2212 and ARMY 2222.

ARMY 3323 Leadership Skills and Small Unit Tactics: 3 semester hours.

Studies leadership techniques and tactical operations at the small-unit level. In-depth analysis of team/squad tactical procedures and techniques. Instruction covers the principals of offensive and defensive combat operations, patrolling, the decision-making process, troop leading procedures, land navigation, and operation orders. Numerous student oral presentations and practical exercises.
Prerequisites: ARMY 3313.

ARMY 3371 Leadership Laboratory V: 1 semester hour.

Considers the fundamentals of leadership. Provides practical exercise in command, organization, and control of small elements, together with physical fitness, using U.S. Army Physical Readiness Training as a model.

ARMY 3381 Leadership Laboratory VI: 1 semester hour.

Considers the fundamentals of leadership. Provides practical exercise in command, organization, and control of small elements, together with physical fitness, using U.S. Army Physical Readiness Training as a model.

ARMY 3993 Independent Study: 1-3 semester hour.

Studies leadership techniques and tactical operations at the small-unit level. An induction to the basic team/squad tactical employment. Instruction covers operation orders, troop leading procedures, and squad movement techniques. Individual skills in map reading, land navigation, basic rifle marksmanship and physical fitness are emphasized. Or it will be an in-depth analysis of team/squad tactical procedures and techniques. Instruction covers the principals of offensive and defensive combat operations, patrolling, the decision-making process, troop leading procedures, land navigation, and operation orders.
Prerequisites: ARMY 2212 and ARMY 2222.

ARMY 4413 Leadership and Management I: 3 semester hours.

Considers the role of the junior officer in the U.S. Army. Individual motivational and behavioral processes, leadership, communications, financial planning, counseling, command and staff functions are emphasized.

ARMY 4423 Leadership and Management II: 3 semester hours.

Pre-service overview of Army organization and general concept of operations. Includes a study of administration and logistics for junior officers, including many sub-courses in military justice, Army readiness, ethics and professionalism, and a review of the principles of war.

ARMY 4471 Leadership Laboratory VII: 1 semester hour.

Considers the fundamentals of leadership. Provides practical exercise in command, organization, and control of small elements, together with physical fitness, using U.S. Army Readiness Training as a model.

ARMY 4481 Leadership Laboratory VIII: 1 semester hour.

Considers the fundamentals of leadership. Provides practical exercise in command, organization, and control of small elements, together with physical fitness, using U.S. Army Readiness Training as a model.

ARMY 4991 Independent Study: 1 semester hour.

Provides practical exercise in command and organization.

ARMY 4993 Independent Study: 1-3 semester hour.

Considers the role of the junior officer in the U.S. Army. Individual motivational and behavioral processes, leadership, communications, financial planning, counseling, command and staff functions are emphasized. Or it will include an overview of Army organization and general concept of operations. Includes a study of administration and logistics for junior officers, including many sub-courses in military justice, Army readiness, ethics and professionalism, and a review of the principles of war.
Prerequisites: ARMY 3313 and ARMY 3323.