Divison of Social Work, Behavioral and Political Sciences

Purpose and Goals

The Division of Social Work, Behavioral and Political Sciences provides support courses for all undergraduate programs in addition to offering degrees in four disciplines. The four degree programs help prepare students to pursue a variety of career options, including urban and regional planning, social work practice, human services, public administration, international affairs, public policy, law enforcement, and legal studies. In addition, the Division offers courses designed for teacher certification in Social Studies.

Academic Standards

Students must earn a minimum grade of “C” in all classes pertaining to their major and in those required in the support area and unrestricted electives. Furthermore, a minimum grade of “C” is required in the minor area (if applicable).

Degree Programs

History (B.A.)
Political Science (B.A.)
Social Work (BASW)
Sociology (B.A., M.A.)

Students majoring in each of the above degree programs must earn a minimum grade of “C” in all classes pertaining to their major and in those required in the support area and unrestricted electives. Furthermore, a minimum grade of “C” is required in the minor area (if applicable).

Teacher Certification

Students seeking teacher certification in history or political science should consult with an advisor in the respective degree plan for requirements and guidelines. Students seeking should select the teacher certification concentration in their respective degree program. The degree will be designated as a Bachelor of Arts in History or Political Science degree with secondary teacher certification. The Department of Curriculum and Instruction in the Whitlowe R. Green College of Education must admit students in the teacher certification program. In order to be admitted in the teacher certification program, a student must:

  1. Complete the University Core;
  2. Complete, with the assistance of your advisor, an admission application;
  3. Have a University core GPA of a 2.50 or higher;
  4. Earn no grade below a “C” in English and Math core courses;
  5. Have required TSI scores:
  6. Math – 350
  7. Reading – 351
  8. Writing – Essay score of 5; Essay score of 4 and multiple choice of 363

Students pursuing certification for secondary school teaching must consult with their advisor in the Division of Social Work, Behavioral and Political Sciences within their first two semesters of study at Prairie View A&M University. For more information, please refer to the teacher certification section of the catalog under the Whitlowe R. Green College of Education for requirements and guidelines.

History Program Description

The History Program at Prairie View A&M University prepares students for careers in areas including, but not limited to, teaching, government, law, public history, and political life. The History Program encourages a systematic study of the past and attempts to use the gained knowledge to explain human nature, behavior and contemporary issues.

Bachelor of Arts in History Degree Program Requirements

Core Curriculum 142
Foreign Language Requirements (One Language)6
Major Requirements 2
HIST 1813World Civilization to 15003
HIST 1823World Civilization since 15003
HIST 3913American Historiography3
HIST 4213African American History to 18653
HIST 4223African American History 1865-Present3
HIST 4903Senior Seminar3
History Electives18
Support Area Requirements
ECON 2113Principles of Microeconomics3
or ECON 2123 Principles of Macroeconomics
ENGL 2423American Literature to 18653
or ENGL 2433 American Literature 1865 to Present
GEOG 1113Introduction to Geography3
POSC 2000 Level or Above3
Unrestricted Electives6
Concentration Requirements (Select one option from below)18
Without Teacher Certification Concentration
18 hours in Minor Area 3
With Teacher Certification Concentration
Educational Foundations
Educational Psychology
Instructional Planning and Assessment
Instructional Methodology and Classroom Management
Student Teaching Secondary II
Total Hours120
1

In order to fulfill the 6 SCH of Life and Physical Sciences requirements, students are advised to take a BIOL, CHEM, PHYS, or PHSC sequence.

2

Students must earn a minimum grade of “C” in all classes pertaining to their major and in those required in the support area and unrestricted electives. Furthermore, a minimum grade of “C” is required in the minor area (if applicable).

3

Depending on the credit hours required by the selected minor.

Political Science Program

The Political Science Program has a mission of providing students with knowledge and training necessary for personal, academic, and professional development in a friendly academic environment. The curriculum is designed to help students develop their reasoning and critical thinking skills and improve their competence in oral and written communication. The fundamental goal of the program is to provide students with the theoretical underpinnings and analytical tools required to research and understand political issues and governmental processes. In addition to providing support courses for all undergraduate studies at Prairie View A&M University, the program strives to achieve the following pivotal goals:

  • Prepare students for graduate and professional schools by exposing them to a variety of concepts, theories and methodologies used in the study of Political Science;

  • Train students for careers in government, law, education, journalism, urban planning, international affairs, business and many other fields on which public policy has an impact; and

  • Help students develop a sustained interest in the day-to-day activities of governmental institutions and processes, as well as in events and issues that occur daily at the local, state, national, and international levels.

The program offers a B.A. in Political Science with courses tailored to students of diverse educational and career interests. The curriculum covers many of the sub-fields of Political Science, such as American government and politics, public law, comparative politics, international politics, public administration, research methodology, and political theory. The program also offers specialty courses in a wide range of topics including blacks in the American political system, race and gender in politics, Gandhi and King and legal studies.  The program requires the completion of 33 credit hours of Political Science courses, of which POSC 2123, POSC 2133, POSC 2413, POSC 3543 and POSC 4113 are required for majors in the discipline.

Bachelor of Arts in Political Science Degree Program Requirements

Core Curriculum 142
Foreign Language Requirements (One Language)6
Major Requirements 2
POSC 2133Introduction to Political Science3
POSC 2413Scope and Methods in Political Science3
POSC 3543International Politics3
POSC 4113American Constitutional Law3
Political Science Electives: (Select seven course from the list below):21
Political Parties and Elections
Public Administration
Legal Studies
Blacks and the American Political System
Global Issues
Studies of the Global South
Latin American and Caribbean Politics
State and Local Government
Modern Political Theory
Public Policy Analysis
Policital Studies Thru Film
Comparative Politics
Comparative Politics of Developing States
U.S. Foreign Policy
African Politics
Middle East Politics
Urban Government and Politics
The Constitution and Private Rights
The Presidency
The Legislative Process
Internship in Political Science
Special Topics in Political Science 4
Judicial Politics
Seminar in Political Science
Support Area
ECON 2123Principles of Macroeconomics3
ENGL 2143Advanced Composition3
or ENGL 2423 American Literature to 1865
or ENGL 2433 American Literature 1865 to Present
or ENGL 3043 Professional Writing for Electronic Media
or ENGL 3243 Studies in American Literature
GEOG 1113Introduction to Geography3
PSYC 2613Fundamental of Statistics3
or SOCG 4053 Social Statistics
Unrestricted Electives9
Concentration Requirement (Select one option from below)18
Without Teacher Certification Concentration
Select 18 hours in a minor area 3
With Teacher Certification Concentration
Educational Foundations
Educational Psychology
Instructional Planning and Assessment
Instructional Methodology and Classroom Management
Student Teaching Secondary II
Total Hours120
1

All Political Science Core Curriculum requirements are shown in the suggested degree program. In order to fulfill the 6 SCH of Life and Physical Sciences requirements, students are advised to take a BIOL, CHEM, PHYS, or PHSC sequence.

2

Students must earn a minimum grade of “C” in all classes pertaining to their major and in those required in the support area and unrestricted electives. Furthermore, a minimum grade of “C” is required in the minor area (if applicable).

3

Depending on the credit hours required by the selected minor.

4

 This course is repeatable for up to 9 semester credits when topic differs.

Professional Social Work Program

Purpose and Goals

The mission of the Baccalaureate Social Work (BASW) Program is to prepare students as generalist Social Work practitioners and provide students with requisite knowledge for advanced study. The Program equips students with core skills and values for beginning level Social Work practice in both rural and urban settings, working with individuals, families, groups, organizations, communities, and populations-at-risk.

The generalist Social Work practice entails a problem solving process (multi-method) at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels (multi-level) utilizing Social Work knowledge, values, and skills, which informs and directs service delivery to assess and intervene with the problems confronting clients (conceptualization). Generalist Practice of the Baccalaureate Social Work Program at Prairie View A&M University utilizes the ecosystems approach, which includes the ecological perspective and systems theory that entail viewing the person and the problem within the environment, and identifies strength within the client as well as the environment. Students apply the problem solving method to empower clients and to intervene across diverse client systems of all sizes (i.e. individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities), both in rural and urban settings.

Students at Prairie View A&M University, a Historically Black College/ University, are provided with a unique opportunity to recognize the importance of the barriers and obstacles regarding disenfranchised people within the social environment, realities of discrimination, and oppression, and the opportunities to enhance social and economic justice.

The Baccalaureate Social Work Program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. The goals of the Social Work Program are to:

  1. Prepare students to understand social welfare policy analysis and its history, as well as policy analysis and its implementation; forms and mechanism of oppression and discrimination, and the strategies of change that advance social and economic justice in both rural and urban settings;

  2. Utilize liberal arts and core generalist competencies to prepare students for practice with client systems of various sizes and types, with considerations to the social context of social work practice and the dynamics of change;

  3. Prepare students to appreciate and conduct ethical Social Work research to evaluate service delivery at all levels of practice and to add to the Social Work knowledge base with qualitative and quantitative methodologies;

  4. Prepare students for entry-level generalist Social Work practice with diverse populations in rural and urban settings at micro, mezzo, and macro levels of practice; based on knowledge, values, ethics and skills of Social Work built on a liberal arts perspective and reinforced through classroom and field experiences; and

  5. Prepare students for a generalist Social Work career as well as graduate social work education and the importance of ongoing growth and development for both students and faculty.

Social Work majors have the opportunities to complete a total of 56 hours of volunteer assignments and the required 400 hours of supervised experiential field instruction in settings, such as rural community centers; mental health and mental retardation agencies; drug and alcohol treatment facilities; agencies serving the elderly; juveniles, adults, and children; public assistance/public welfare; school Social Work service; and policy-making entities and Social Work administration. Graduates of the Social Work Program secure employment in a variety of agencies, including hospitals, schools, child welfare, probation and parole centers, residential treatment centers, and other public and private agencies.

Academic Progress

Social Work majors must maintain satisfactory progress in the major. Students will be evaluated by their respective advisor each semester. Students maintaining unsatisfactory academic progress will be evaluated for continuation in the Social Work Program. Students must meet with their respective advisor to ensure courses are taken in the proper sequence for the Social Work major (See Social Work Suggested Degree Program Sequence). Students must complete the Liberal Arts prerequisite courses and SOWK 2113 prior to enrolling in Social Work core courses for their junior and senior years. Students must take all SOWK upper division core courses in proper sequential order.

A Social Work major must maintain a grade of “C” or better in all SOWK courses. No SOWK prefix course may be repeated more than once to achieve a passing grade of “C”.  A minimum of a 2.50 GPA in all SOWK courses is required to qualify for Field Education and graduation with a BASW degree.  A student who fails to achieve a passing grade in any of the SOWK prefix courses after two attempts must seek a major in another discipline. Students must earn a minimum grade of “C” in all Social Work courses and in those required in the support area. The Program does not offer credit for life or work experience.

The Social Work Program does not give credit in whole or part for previous work experiences or life experiences in lieu of field instruction or for any social work core courses.

Admission Requirements

Students desiring to pursue the Baccalaureate Social Work degree must complete procedures designed to determine their suitability and/or readiness for professional generalist Social Work practice. Freshmen students changing their major, and transfer students may declare Social Work as a major for the purpose of advisement. Students interested in a Social Work major initially meet with the Director of Social Work Program who interviews the student regarding their knowledge of Social Work and what they hope to accomplish with a degree in Social Work. Students are identified as Prospective Social Work Majors until they are officially accepted into the Program. This usually occurs during the sophomore year when the student is nearing completion of the Program’s required Liberal Arts Perspective and other basic freshmen/sophomore level courses. Prior to official acceptance, students must have completed the pre-professional Social Work course: SOWK 2113, Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare, with a minimum grade of “C”. Students are expected to attend the Social Work Major’s Orientation scheduled during the fall semester.

Admission of Transfer Students

The Social Work Program follows the University’s guidelines for transfer credit of University core requirements and proficiency examinations (College Level Examination Program or CLEP). Guidelines and procedures for general transfer of core curriculum courses and proficiency examinations are described in the Undergraduate Catalog.

Liberal Arts courses that meet the requirements for Social Work degree will be accepted as transfer credit. The Social Work Program accepts transfer credits of Social Work courses only from CSWE accredited programs. The Social Work Program may request copies of syllabi as deemed appropriate.

Academic and Professional Advisement

Each Social Work major (current or prospective) is assigned to a Social Work faculty advisor. Students are strongly encouraged to be proactive in seeking advisement and in strictly following their degree plan. Each Social Work major must meet with his or her respective advisor at least once per semester, and more often as needed. Advisement includes appropriate guidance in academic course work, satisfactory progress in the major, adherence to Social Work Codes of Ethics, and career options for employment.

Bachelor of Arts in Social Work Degree Program Requirements

Core Curriculum 142
Foreign Language Requirements (Spanish Recommended)6
Social Work Major Requirements
SOWK 2113Introduction to the Field of Social Work3
SOWK 2133Social Work with Children and Families3
SOWK 3113Social Welfare Policy and Services3
SOWK 3123Social Welfare Policy Analysis3
SOWK 3133Human Behavior and the Social Environment I3
SOWK 3143Human Behavior and the Social Environment II3
SOWK 3213Human and Cultural Diversity Social Work3
SOWK 4123Social Work Practice I3
SOWK 4133Social Work Practice II3
SOWK 4143Social Work Research I3
SOWK 4153Social Work Research II3
SOWK 4176Field Practicum 26
SOWK 4183Integrative Seminar 23
Select three of the following:9
Multicultural Issues in Mental Health
Social Work with At-Risk Juveniles
Gerontological Social Work
Generalist Crisis Intervention
Intervention with Addicted Family
Special topics in Social Work
Support Area Requirements
SOCG 1013General Sociology3
ECON 2113Principles of Microeconomics3
or ECON 2123 Principles of Macroeconomics
PSYC 1113General Psychology3
Select one from the following:3
Elementary Statistics
Fundamental of Statistics
Social Statistics
Unrestricted Electives9
Total Hours120
1

Social Work majors are required to complete  BIOL 1113, and one other Life and Physical Science course from the university approved Life and Physical Sciences course list.

2

SOWK 4176 and SOWK 4183 must be taken concurrently.

Sociology Program

Purpose and Goals

The Bachelors of Arts degree program in Sociology offers a curriculum that enables students to analyze, critically evaluate, and engage in the planning of solutions to problems that evolve from patterns of human social interaction. Sociologists analyze systems that range from individuals in small groups to entire societies. In addition to social theory and social research, students may choose courses in criminology, gerontology, substance abuse, the family, deviant behavior, and modern social problems. The Sociology Program prepares students for professional careers with government agencies and with the business sector. Students pursuing a Baccalaureate degree in Sociology may become certified in secondary education. Additionally, a Sociology degree is an excellent preparation for many post-baccalaureate degree programs.

The Northwest Houston Center

Only upper-level sociology courses are offered by the Sociology Program at The University Northwest Houston Center. Students seeking degrees must transfer the lower level courses to fulfill the University Core Requirements along with the College Level Requirements and Program Support Area Requirements. Additionally, as determined in consultation with an advisor, students are expected to transfer courses that will fulfill the minor requirements.

The University of Houston-Downtown has been assigned the responsibility of providing common support courses for all baccalaureate degree programs at The University Center. Sam Houston State University will provide these support courses that the University of Houston-Downtown chooses not to offer. If neither the University of Houston-Downtown nor Sam Houston State University provides a required support course, the University of Houston Distance Learning courses will be available.

The colleges of the NHMCCD are responsible for providing articulated freshman and sophomore level courses for each of the baccalaureate degrees.

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology Degree Program Requirements

Core Curriculum 142
Foreign Language Requirement (One Language)6
Major Requirements 2
SOCG 1013General Sociology3
SOCG 4053Social Statistics3
SOCG 4723Sociological Research Methods3
SOCG 4733Sociological Theory3
SOCG 4783Senior Seminar in Sociology3
Eight SOCG electives determined in consultation with an advisor.24
Support Area Requirements
ECON 2113Principles of Microeconomics3
or ECON 2123 Principles of Macroeconomics
ENGL 1143Technical Writing3
or ENGL 2143 Advanced Composition
PSYC 1113General Psychology3
Minor Requirements 318
Unrestricted Electives6
Total Hours120
1

All Sociology Core Curriculum requirements are shown in the suggested degree program. In order to fulfill the 6 SCH of Life and Physical Sciences requirements, students are advised to take a BIOL, CHEM, PHYS, or PHSC sequence.

2

Students must earn a minimum grade of a “C” in all classes pertaining to their major and in those required in the support area and unrestricted electives. Furthermore, a minimum grade of a “C” is required in the minor area (if applicable).

3

Depending on the credit hours required by the selected minor.

Purpose and Goals

The mission of the graduate program in Sociology at Prairie View A&M University is to develop professional sociologists who are broadly educated in substantive areas of sociology and well trained in theory and methods.

The Master of Arts degree program in sociology offers a curriculum that enables students to analyze, critically evaluate and engage in the planning of solutions to problems that evolve from patterns of human social interaction. The graduate program prepares students for advanced study (e.g., Ph.D.) in sociology, criminology, law, and social welfare.

Admission Requirements

In addition to the regular application requirements of the university, applicants to the M.A. program must have the following:

  1. A minimum of fifteen hours of undergraduate sociology courses is required, including one course in sociological theory, a basic statistics course, and a course in research methods. Students who apply without this background may be admitted under the condition that they must make up the undergraduate deficiency before starting the MA degree program courses. None of the courses used to correct the deficiency may be counted toward the MA degree.
  2. Applicants must present evidence that they are capable of successfully completing a rigorous graduate program. Such evidence must include completion of a department application, and three letters of recommendation from persons in a position to evaluate the student’s academic potential.

Master of Arts in Sociology Degree Program

A total of 36 semester hours of graduate course work must be completed in graduate status. For those opting to do a thesis, the requirements include 30 hours of course work and 6 hours devoted to the M.A. thesis. Upon the decision to undertake a thesis, the student will form a committee consisting of two sociology faculty, one of whom will serve as the principle advisor, and one additional faculty member from the Division of Social Work, Behavioral and Political Sciences. The topic of the thesis will be determined by the student and the advisor. The format will follow ASA thesis guidelines in conjunction with established criteria by the Sociology Program. The thesis must be orally defended and approved by all members of the faculty thesis committee before the degree is conferred. The student must register for the thesis each semester until satisfactorily completed. No graduate credit will be given for undergraduate courses.

For students selecting the thesis option, 30 hours of course work must be completed and 6 hours of supervised thesis hours. Of the 30 hours of course work, 9 hours are core requirements and the remaining 21 are sociology support/elective requirements - of which no more than 6 hours are to be taken outside of the program.

For students selecting the non-thesis option, 36 hours of course work must be completed: 9 hours of core courses, 21 hours of support area requirements, and 6 hours taken outside the program.

Admission to candidacy will be granted upon completion of 12 semester hours of graduate work in sociology with an average grade of B or better. These hours must be completed in residence. The student must complete the Application for Admission to Candidacy form, through the Division of Social Work, Behavioral and Political Sciences, to the Dean of the Graduate School for approval.

Students must maintain an average GPA of 3.0. Only two courses with a “C” grade, regardless of credit hours, will be accepted toward credit for the Master’s degree.

Degree Program Requirements

Major Requirements
SOCG 5123Social Statistics3
SOCG 5213Classical Sociological Theory3
SOCG 5223Research Methods3
Select two courses from the courses listed below:6
Fundamentals of School Administration
Educational Administration: Theory, Practice and Research
School-Community Relations
Introduction to Community Development
Organization and Administration of Guidance and Human Service Programs
Theory and Practice of Counseling
Counseling Process
Consultation
Professional Orientation and Development
Psychology of Abnormal Behavior
Career Development Counseling
Human Growth and Development
Cross-Cultural Issues
Concentrations (Select one from below)21
Thesis Concentration
Thesis
Thesis
15 hours from the Sociology Elective Courses below
Non-Thesis concentrations
21 hours from the Sociology Elective Courses below
Sociology Electives:
Urban Sociology
Sociology of Education
Aspects Of Poverty
Criminology
Seminar in Race Relations
Contemporary Sociological Theory
Social Stratification
Theory of Criminal Justice System
Social Movements
Complex Organizations
Special Topics (see list below) 1
Sociology of Gender and Sex Roles
Total Hours36
1

 P01 Juvenile Delinquency, P02 Poverty, P03 Deviant Behavior, P04 Global Sociology, P05 Persistent Poverty, P06 Environmental, P07 Family, P08 Demography, P09 Political Sociology. 

Minors in the Division of Social Work, Behavioral and Political Science

Students are strongly encouraged to add minors to broaden their knowledge base and improve their chances in the workplace.  The College offers minors in the following eight areas:

  • African-American Studies
  • Behavioral and Political Science
  • Geography
  • History
  • Legal Studies
  • Political Science
  • Social Work
  • Sociology

Requirements for a Minor in African American Studies

The African American Studies minor is interdisciplinary and provides students the opportunity to gain knowledge and understanding of the African American influence on the social, political, cultural, and intellectual development of America. Courses may not be used to satisfy multiple academic requirements such as core curriculum requirement, major and minor requirements.

Required:
HIST 4213African American History to 18653
HIST 4223African American History 1865-Present3
Select four (4) classes from the list below:12
African American Art
Minorities and the Criminal Justice System
African American Theatre I
African American Theatre II
Survey of African-American Literature
Studies in African-American Literature
Geography of Africa
African History
Women in History
Human Development: Life Span
Afro-American Music
Blacks and the American Political System
African Politics
Sociology of Minorities
African Family and Culture
Total Hours18

Requirements for a Minor in Behavioral and Political Science

The Division offers a minor in Behavioral and Political Science designed to provide a sound understanding of the basic concepts, assumptions, research methods, and techniques used in the social sciences. The History Program administers the minor. Students are advised to consult with the Division Head in selecting appropriate courses for their minor. Any course taken for their minor may not be used to satisfy other requirements such as a core curriculum requirement or a major or minor requirement. Any combination of 18 semester credit hours with no more than six hours in any one discipline will constitute an integrated social science minor. Sample courses for this minor are listed below. Any courses from the disciplines listed below may be used to fulfill the minor requirements. Other disciplines related to social sciences may also be considered for substitution in consultation with the Division Head.

CRJS, ECON, GEOG, HIST, POSC, PSYC, and SOCG

Requirements for a Minor in Geography

GEOG 1113Introduction to Geography3
GEOG 1223Introduction to Physical Geography3
GEOG 2743Geography of Africa3
GEOG 3723World Regional Geography3
Three (3)courses from the list below:9
Introduction to Geographic Information System
Urban Geography
Cultural Geography
Geography of Texas
Political Geography
Total Hours21

Requirements for a Minor in History

HIST 1813World Civilization to 15003
HIST 1823World Civilization since 15003
HIST 2313The U S -1492 to 18323
HIST 4903Senior Seminar3
Two courses selected from the HIST 2000 level or above course options.6
Total Hours18

Requirements for a Minor in Legal Studies (18 SCH)

The Legal Studies minor is interdisciplinary and prepares students for work in the legal field (e.g., paralegal or law clerk), or post baccalaureate education in the law. The minor requires 18 semester credit hours.  Courses may not be used to satisfy multiple academic requirements such as core curriculum requirement, major or other minor requirements.

Required:
POSC 2143Legal Studies3
PHIL 2303Critical Thinking3
Select four (4) courses from the classes below, no more than 6 SCH from any one discipline:12
Legal Environment of Business
Business Law
Communication Law & Ethics
Construction Law and Ethics
Principles of Criminal Justice
Court Systems and Practices
Criminal Procedure
Evidence Law
Criminal Law I
Criminal Law II
International and Federal Criminal Law
Ethics
American Constitutional Law
The Constitution and Private Rights
Special Topics in Political Science
Judicial Politics
Correctional Treatment and Public Policy
Sociology of Drug Enforcement
Sociology of Probation and Parole
Total Hours18

Requirements for a Minor in Political Science

(When the program area is taken as a Minor in another degree program)

POSC 2133Introduction to Political Science3
POSC 2413Scope and Methods in Political Science3
Four Political Science courses, 2000 level or higher12
Total Hours18

Requirements for a Minor in Social Work

A minor is social work is offered solely to enhance student's learning in the area of social services. This minor is only available for non-social work majors. The Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) does not accept a minor in social work as adequate preparation for entry level social work practice; neither does a minor in social work qualify students to take state licensure examinations. Students who seek social work as a minor in another degree program must complete:

SOWK 2113Introduction to the Field of Social Work3
SOWK 3113Social Welfare Policy and Services3
SOWK 3133Human Behavior and the Social Environment I3
SOWK 4123Social Work Practice I3
Two Social Work Electives6
Total Hours18

Requirements for a Minor in Sociology

SOCG 1013General Sociology3
SOCG 4733Sociological Theory3
Four Sociology Electives12
Total Hours18

Honor Societies, Clubs, and Service Organizations

Sponsored by the political science faculty, the Blackstone Pre-Law Society is open to all students interested in law. The society promotes an awareness of the LSAT and general law school requirements, thereby facilitating preparation for entry into law school.

Open to all majors and other interested persons, the W.E.B. DuBois History Club provides non-classroom activities related to the study of history.

A national geography fraternity, the Iota Epsilon Chapter of Gamma Theta Upsilon recognizes high academic attainment on the part of students with either a major or a minor in geography. It is open to students who maintain an average of a “B” or better and serves both the needs for good human relationships and for sharing information concerning the field of geography.

Membership in Phi Alpha Theta International Honor Society is open to undergraduate students who have completed 12 semester hours of history with a grade point average of a 3.10 or above in history courses and 3.00 in two-thirds of the remainder of the course work, excluding history.

Membership in the Political Science Club is encouraged for all political science majors. The purpose of this organization is to promote an awareness of politics at all levels and facilitate understanding of public policy making through field trips, seminars, lecture series, and other educational activities.

Membership in the Rho Nu Chapter of Pi Sigma Alpha , the national Political Science Honor Society, is open to students, undergraduate and graduate, who have completed at least twelve semester hours of course work in political science at the 2000 level or higher, with an average grade of a "B' or  higher.  Consult the Political Science program coordinator for information on other requirements and the induction ceremony.

The Model United Nations (MUN) Club is an academic organization which sponsors trips to MUN conferences,usually in New York City.  Advised by the Political Science Program, the MUN club welcomes students from all academic fields.  The organization conducts fundraisers, academic seminars, and other activities to prepare its members for attendance at the national conference.  PVAMU students interact with students from all over the world as they play the role of a specific country's diplomatic staff at the UN and try to solve conflicts related to real-world international problems and crises.

The Social Work Action Club (SWAC) is open to all social work majors and prospective majors. The club sponsors events that support local community residents and organizations. Members participate in local, regional, and national professional social work conferences and symposia.

Association of Black Social Work Students (ABSWS) Houston Chapter is open to students of African descent. The purpose of ABSWS is to promote the welfare and survival of the Black community and promote Black unity. The Organization sponsors campus and community events. Members participate in forums, workshops, and professional conferences at local, state, and national levels. Scholarship opportunities are also available.

The motto of Alpha Delta Mu Social Work Honor Society is “Advocate of the People”. The purpose of Alpha Delta Mu is to advance excellence in social work practice and to encourage, stimulate, and maintain scholarship of the individual members in all fields, particularly social work. Senior Social Work majors with a 3.0 minimum cumulative grade point average are eligible to join Alpha Delta Mu.

The George R. Ragland Scholars is open to all majors. Members must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 and be dedicated to social services and to helping others. Interested students in all disciplines are encouraged to join.

The Sociology Club is open to all sociology majors and minors, and to other students interested in gaining greater awareness about human societies and cultures.

Membership in Alpha Kappa Delta (AKD) International Sociology Honor Society is open to sociology majors of junior standing with a minimum 3.0 GPA. AKD promotes excellence in scholarship, research, and social and intellectual activities leading to the improvement of the human condition.

The Phi Alpha Honor Society , with the motto “Through Knowledge – the challenge to serve,” is a national Social Work honor society. The purposes of Phi Alpha Honor Society are to provide a closer bond among students of social work and promote humanitarian goals and ideals. Phi Alpha fosters high standards of education for social workers and invites into membership those who have attained excellence in scholarship and achievement in social work. Senior Social Work majors with an overall grade point average of 3.0 on 4.0 scale and a 3.25 grade point average in required social work courses are eligible to join the Prairie View A&M University Lambda NU Chapter of Phi Alpha Honor Society.

Geography Courses

GEOG 1113 Introduction to Geography: 3 semester hours.

A survey of the cultural and physical elements of geography, their characteristics, spatial organization, and distribution as viewed in the discipline today.

GEOG 1223 Introduction to Physical Geography: 3 semester hours.

General introduction to the field of geography, emphasizing the study of the physical earth and of man in his physical environment.

GEOG 2113 Introduction to Geographic Information System: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the fundamentals of Geographic Information System (GIS) and science and art of making maps. The course introduces students to the basic principles of using GIS as a tool for managing and analyzing spatial data.

GEOG 2523 Urban Geography: 3 semester hours.

Study of the form, function, classification, internal land use and structure, and intercity and city/hinterland relations of urban areas, with particular emphasis on United States.

GEOG 2633 Cultural Geography: 3 semester hours.

A survey of the major cultures of the world, human-environmental relations and their dissimilar developments; processes of innovation, diffusion types, population patterns, growth and migration.

GEOG 2743 Geography of Africa: 3 semester hours.

Through an understanding of geographical facts, common myths associated with African history and development are dispelled. As a result, strong emphasis is placed on climates, physiography, natural resources, and social conditions in Africa. Selected countries are discussed in detail.

GEOG 3713 Geography of Texas: 3 semester hours.

Emphasis on the geographic regions of our own state: the problems of proper adaptations of man to environment; the geographical distribution and development of natural resources in the state; and the possibilities of greater human development.

GEOG 3723 World Regional Geography: 3 semester hours.

A survey of the regions and nations of the world and the geographical foundations of their physical and cultural characteristics; a practical and systematic approach to the field of geography; a survey of the world in terms of outlook and regional types.

GEOG 3733 Political Geography: 3 semester hours.

This course examines the influence which the natural environment has on the evolution of cultures, the establishment of political boundaries and political systems and on the nature of international trade and politics.

GEOG 4993 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research and/or field work on selected topics.

History Courses

HIST 1313 U.S. to 1876: 3 semester hours.

This course covers American development from the era of discovery to the close of the Civil War. This course includes modules on the following topics: the colonial era; the young republic; westward expansion; and sectionalism; Civil War, and Reconstruction.
Prerequisites: RDNG 0131.

HIST 1323 U.S. 1876 to Present: 3 semester hours.

Surveys modern American development: the industrial nation and its problems; expansionist and muckraker; the First Crusade, Normalcy and Reaction, Depression, and the New Deal; and the Second World War and after. Lectures, special readings, discussion, supervised study, and tests.

HIST 1333 History of Texas: 3 semester hours.

Survey of Texas starting from Spanish colonization to the present. Emphasis will be placed on contributions made to the state of Texas by various ethnic groups.

HIST 1343 Intro to Historical Methods: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed to introduce students majoring in History and American studies to methodological developments in the historical profession, with emphasis on twentieth century advances.

HIST 1813 World Civilization to 1500: 3 semester hours.

Survey of the ancient world from the dawn of civilization in Egypt, Mesopotamia, China, India and Mesoamerica through the Middle Ages in Europe. Attention is given to political, social and economic institutions as well as art, literature and religion.

HIST 1823 World Civilization since 1500: 3 semester hours.

Survey of key developments in Western and non-Western civilizations from the Renaissance to the present. Special emphasis is placed on religious conflict, militarism, intellectual and political revolutions, formation of modem nation-states, post-colonialism, and the end of the Cold War.

HIST 2203 Military History: 3 semester hours.

Military History - Past Wars, conflicts and study of war heroes.

HIST 2313 The U S -1492 to 1832: 3 semester hours.

American development from the period of discovery to the close of Jackson's Presidency. This includes the colonial era, the American Revolution, and the Constitution, the growth of democracy in the young republic, and the conflict between sections that produced national crisis. Lectures, discussions, special maps, and written reports. Offered first semester yearly.

HIST 2323 The U S 1837 to 1898: 3 semester hours.

Surveys period of bourgeois revolution and the rise of group democracy in America by examining the rise of common man, slavery-abolition-sectional imperialism, popular sovereignty-the last formula, the irrepressible conflict and the new nation, and the problems of industrialism. Also covers postwar industry, labor, and agricultural. Lectures, discussions, special maps and written reports.
Prerequisites: HIST 2313.

HIST 2413 Pre-Colonial African History: 3 semester hours.

Study of African history before the arrival of the Europeans which examines the growth and evolution of political, social, and economic institutions of various African countries. Special attention will be given to the western portion of Africa (Ghana, Mali, and Songhay) and areas south of the Sahara.

HIST 2423 Post-Colonial African History: 3 semester hours.

Survey of African History since the end of WWII; events and issues leading up to independence; efforts at nation-building; problems of political instability and economic development.

HIST 2433 Colonial Latin American and Caribbean History: 3 semester hours.

This course provides students with an understanding of the historical experience of the region from first contact with Europeans through the wars of independence.

HIST 2613 African History: 3 semester hours.

This course is a systematic study of African History. It looks at the forces impacting the growth and evolution of the political, social, and economic institutions of various countries of Africa, with a concentration on the western portion of Africa (Ghana, Melle, and Songhay region), south of the Sahara.

HIST 3223 Women in History: 3 semester hours.

A survey of selected issues related to the historical status of women in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas, with emphasis on African-American women in the United States since slavery.

HIST 3233 Study in American History: 3 semester hours.

This course will present a detailed examination of American history. Students will have to deal with the myriad issues which flow from questions of nationality, ethnicity, race, class, and gender in the midst of an industrializing nation with innumerable bourgeoning political, economic, social, and cultural institutions.

HIST 3323 Contemporary United States: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of the emergence of the United States as a modern nation and examination of the changing United States' social, political, economic, cultural and diplomatic scene with emphasis on the progressive trends, 1900 - Present.

HIST 3913 American Historiography: 3 semester hours.

Survey of the writing of American history, with emphasis on social-intellectual motivation and historical theory. Representative historical literature of the following periods will be examined: colonial and revolutionary; the "Middle Period," literary and romantic; and modern and contemporary. Lectures, discussions, independent study, and special reports.

HIST 3993 Independent Study: 1-3 semester hour.

Readings, research, and/or field work on selected topics.

HIST 4213 African American History to 1865: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of the experiences of African Americans from colonial time to the end of the Civil War.

HIST 4223 African American History 1865-Present: 3 semester hours.

Traces the social, economic, cultural, and political activities of African Americans from Reconstruction through the Civil Rights movement.

HIST 4313 Foreign Relations: 3 semester hours.

Diplomatic history of the United States covering: the colonial background and the emergence of the cardinal principles of American foreign policy and its mechanics through the revolutionary and early national periods, the New Nationalism, Manifest Destiny and Westward Expansion, Civil War diplomacy, and projections abroad. Lectures, book reports, forums, and research projects.

HIST 4323 Diplomatic History of the U.S.: 3 semester hours.

A topical survey of United States diplomacy covering: the New Manifest Destiny, and the extension of the nation's commitments, the Great Crusade and after, the United States, the Second World War, and post-war diplomacy. Lectures, book reports, forums, and research projects.

HIST 4443 Special Topics: 3 semester hours.

This course will focus on specific historical topics that the professor deems appropriate and student's desire. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

HIST 4903 Senior Seminar: 3 semester hours.

Advanced training in historical methods and historiography designed to measure student's understanding and mastery of the discipline.

HIST 4993 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research, and/or field work on selected topics.

HIST 5213 Afro-American History: 3 semester hours.

This course emphasizes the importance of the black contribution to America's history. In examining that history, the course investigates the stereotyped views that have been handed down from one generation to the next, slanted accounts of black experience, apathy of many blacks and prejudices of many whites.

HIST 5313 American Revolution and the Constitution: 3 semester hours.

An examination of scholarly research into the American Revolution that regards certain aspects of the Revolution as "clinical phenomena" in the development of revolutions in general; ideological background, actionists and vigilantes, the fall of Tory rule, the internal revolution, subsidence of the fever, and the Neuer Ordnung.

HIST 5323 Sectionalism and Civil War: 3 semester hours.

Regional hypothesis; socioeconomic regionalism; government, politics, and the regional compromise in the middle period; important issues and men; Reconstruction and the new nation.

HIST 5353 Economic History: 3 semester hours.

Historical review of the development of agriculture, commerce, industry, and business from colonial times to the present; social and economic forces in American society with attention to the present; social and economic forces in American society with attention to various mass movements; industrialization for the country and the necessity for governmental regulations; historical interpretation of trade unions, employers' associations, and cooperatives.

HIST 5363 Contemporary United States: 3 semester hours.

Twentieth century American development: America comes of age; the quest for social justice; the Great Crusade (World War I): postwar normalcy and reaction; democracy in transition-the New Deal; and American leadership in the United Nations.

HIST 5383 American Foreign Relations: 3 semester hours.

The United States and its relationships with Latin America and the rest of the world. Public opinion and the economy.

HIST 5923 Tools of Scientific History: 3 semester hours.

History and its relationship to the social sciences; the subject, collection and classification of sources; the criticism of data; exposition or the presentation of historical evidence.

HIST 5993 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research, and/or field work on selected topics.

Philosophy Courses

PHIL 2013 Introduction to Philosophy: 3 semester hours.

Examination of selected philosophical readings concerning the theory of knowledge, the nature of being, the theory of values, social ideals and religion and other philosophical problems and issues. Reading will be taken from original western and nonwestern sources.

PHIL 2023 Ethics: 3 semester hours.

Combines the philosophical study of normative ethics with the study of contemporary applied ethics through examination of a number of tendencies and schools of ethics from various cultures, societies and historical periods. The aim of the course is to enhance the student's awareness and sensitivity to the perplexity of morality and the moral life.
Prerequisites: ENGL 1123.

PHIL 2303 Critical Thinking: 3 semester hours.

Course is designed to develop students' ability to recognize and evaluate arguments. Focus will include: The most frequently encountered fallacies and errors in reasoning; the use/abuse of statistics; and principles of logic applied to daily life.
Prerequisites: ENGL 1123.

PHIL 3023 History of Philosophy: 3 semester hours.

A survey of the major philosophers and philosophical problems from the Pre-Socratic through Modern Philosophy (600 B.C.E.-1600 A.C.E.) using primary texts. Among the philosophers studied are Zeno, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, and Duns Scotus.
Prerequisites: PHIL 2013.

Political Science Courses

POSC 1113 American Government: 3 semester hours.

Surveys the origin and development of the U.S. Constitution; the structure and powers of the national government including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches; federalism; areas of political participation; the national election process; public policy ; civil liberties and civil rights.

POSC 1123 Texas Government: 3 semester hours.

Surveys the origin and development of the Texas Constitution; the structure and powers of Texas Government, including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches; local government; areas of political participation and public policy in Texas.

POSC 2113 Political Parties and Elections: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed to study the nature, functions, evolution, and organization of the American political parties and elections.

POSC 2123 Public Administration: 3 semester hours.

This course provides an examination of the organization, responsibility, personnel management, fiscal processes, functions, and problems of public administration.

POSC 2133 Introduction to Political Science: 3 semester hours.

This is an introductory course in the study of politics, the various sub-fields in the discipline, and the variety of approaches used in the study of Political Science.
Prerequisites: POSC 1113 and POSC 1123.

POSC 2143 Legal Studies: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed to be an extensive examination of the structure, functions, and processes of this nation's legal system. By the end of the course, students will have training in a wide variety of topics involving the law and have the skills necessary to succeed on the LSAT or in law school.

POSC 2213 Blacks and the American Political System: 3 semester hours.

This course offers a critical analysis of the position of blacks in the American politico-economic system, both historically and contemporarily.

POSC 2413 Scope and Methods in Political Science: 3 semester hours.

This course introduces majors to the various methods and approaches used in the field of Political Science.

POSC 2503 Global Issues: 3 semester hours.

Selected issues facing the global community are examined. Issues include hunger, energy, population, war and racism. The course has interdisciplinary and cross-cultural focus.

POSC 2523 Studies of the Global South: 3 semester hours.

The course surveys and analyzes the social, political and economic challenges facing Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

POSC 2533 Latin American and Caribbean Politics: 3 semester hours.

Designed to provide a comprehensive introduction to Latin American and Caribbean politics from a multi-disciplinary perspective. Examines the various dimensions of Latin American and Caribbean politics, including political and governmental structures, political and economic development and social stratification patterns. Analyzes the implications of globalization on Latin American and Caribbean political and socio-economic systems.

POSC 2543 State and Local Government: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of state and local governments in the federal system; encompasses an examination of the state and local politics in the United States with an emphasis on politics and public policy.

POSC 3123 Modern Political Theory: 3 semester hours.

This course is a review of the political theories from the Reformation to the present, with special attention to Machiavelli, Boding, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Jefferson, Rousseau, Mills, Hegel, and Marx.

POSC 3213 Public Policy Analysis: 3 semester hours.

The course explores the processes involved in the formulation and implementation of authoritative decisions, with emphasis on alternative models of policy analysis and selected issues pertaining to the federal government and bureaucracy.

POSC 3313 Policital Studies Thru Film: 3 semester hours.

This course critically analyzes films that portray concepts and issues that are fundamental to the study of political science, including freedom and equality, power imbalances, revolution and war, and political structures and processes.
Prerequisites: POSC 1113 or POSC 1123.

POSC 3513 Comparative Politics: 3 semester hours.

Examines the dynamics of Comparative Politics from the perspective of globalization characterized by the world's increasing interconnectedness, particularly in regards to politics, economics, communication and cultures. Provides a comprehensive analysis of nations encompassing histories, societies, politics and economics. Examines contemporary nations in the context of current trends, including modernization, democracy, the environment, human rights, terrorism, security and globalization. Explores symbolic countries in case studies.

POSC 3523 Comparative Politics of Developing States: 3 semester hours.

The course examines political processes in the developing nations of Africa, Asia, and Latin America, with particular attention to the problems of political integration and nation building.

POSC 3533 U.S. Foreign Policy: 3 semester hours.

This is a study of the American foreign policy, including the objectives, capabilities and formulation process.

POSC 3543 International Politics: 3 semester hours.

The basic problems of international politics, focusing on the power competition among states and other transnational institutions, are the major focus of this course.

POSC 3553 African Politics: 3 semester hours.

This is an introductory course in the political history and development of African states.

POSC 3593 Middle East Politics: 3 semester hours.

This course makes a comprehensive study of the major issues and dilemmas in contemporary Middle Eastern politics, including the clash of religions and nationalisms, security and stability in the Persian Gulf, the Arab-Israeli conflict, efforts at democratization, and the role of women.

POSC 3993 Independent Study: 1-3 semester hour.

Readings, research, and/or field work on selected topics.

POSC 4103 Urban Government and Politics: 3 semester hours.

This course examines the structure and functions of urban government. Considerable attention is given to the politics and current problems of metropolitan areas.

POSC 4113 American Constitutional Law: 3 semester hours.

The principles of the American constitutional system, judicial interpretation and application of these principles, relative to the powers of government and the rights of individuals, are examined in depth.
Prerequisites: POSC 1113 and POSC 1123.

POSC 4123 The Constitution and Private Rights: 3 semester hours.

Examines the rights and duties of U. S. citizenship with special attention to individual freedoms, Primarily those found in the Bill of Rights. Emphasis is on the First Amendment, rights of the accused, the right to privacy and equal protection of the law.
Prerequisites: POSC 1113 and POSC 1123.

POSC 4133 The Presidency: 3 semester hours.

This course traces the evolution of the office of the President of the United States while examining presidential powers in the areas of politics, administration, legislation, war, and foreign affairs.

POSC 4143 The Legislative Process: 3 semester hours.

The course provides a detailed study of the nature and extent of the legislative process, with special attention to the organization, procedure, and dynamics of the American legislative policy-making.

POSC 4153 Internship in Political Science: 3 semester hours.

The student will participate in the ongoing work of a government agency, at the local, state, national or international level or a related nongovernment organization that engages in domestic or international political affairs. Administered by the Political Science Program Coordinator in conjunction with onsight intern supervisor.

POSC 4193 Special Topics in Political Science: 3 semester hours.

This course will focus on specific topics in political science which the professor deems appropriate and students desire. This course is repeatable for up to 9 semester credit hours when topics vary.

POSC 4203 Judicial Politics: 3 semester hours.

This course makes an extensive analysis of the structure, functions and processes of the U.S. judicial and legal systems on both the federal and the state levels.

POSC 4213 Seminar in Political Science: 3 semester hours.

This course is devoted to intensive reading, writing, research, and discussion focusing on selected topics.

POSC 4993 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research, and/or field-work on selected topics. Prerequisite: consent of advisor.

Social Work Courses

SOWK 2113 Introduction to the Field of Social Work: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the profession of social work and the institution of social welfare. Include overviews of social welfare history; the range of contemporary services and agencies, and professional values, ethics, licensing and associates. Generalist social work model presented. Involves agency experience. Required for social work major and minor.

SOWK 2133 Social Work with Children and Families: 3 semester hours.

Examination of social and cultural constructs of childhood including history and development of child welfare services; childhood developmental stages; social policy relevant to children, families and their well-being; assessment, intervention and direct services for children and families.

SOWK 2173 Multicultural Issues in Mental Health: 3 semester hours.

Exploration of the etiology and treatment modalities for addressing mental health issues with culturally diverse populations including African American, Hispanic American, and Asian American.

SOWK 3113 Social Welfare Policy and Services: 3 semester hours.

Introduces social welfare as a system of arrangements, programs, and mechanism for generalist social work practice in meeting human needs; survey of social welfare and issues related to social and economic justice.

SOWK 3123 Social Welfare Policy Analysis: 3 semester hours.

Study of the history, philosophy, structure and function of social welfare services; examination of policy-making processes and models, and effects of legislation on social work practice. Utilizes interdisciplinary approach including social, political, legal, economic and administrative.

SOWK 3133 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I: 3 semester hours.

Dynamics of human behavior and effects of the social environment on individual development. Process of human development adaptation from infancy through adolescence with an examination of developmental states, transitions and problems inclusive of the person in the environment.

SOWK 3143 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II: 3 semester hours.

Continuation of the person in the environment emphasizing theoretical orientation, building understanding and knowledge of human behavior as influenced by bio-psycho-social-cultural factors. Emphasis on current perspectives on adulthood and aging, and theories helpful for understanding work with individuals in the context of their social environment.
Prerequisites: SOWK 3133.

SOWK 3153 Social Work with At-Risk Juveniles: 3 semester hours.

Emphasizes generalist approach to delinquency prevention, and intervention within the correctional system.

SOWK 3163 Gerontological Social Work: 3 semester hours.

Introduction of fundamentals in gerontology (theories, principles, and concepts); interdisciplinary approaches to aging and life-span development including ecological and systems perspective.

SOWK 3173 Minority Aging: 3 semester hours.

Designed to survey the process of aging among predominant minority groups in the United States and other parts of the world. At completion of this course students should be able to identify and describe patterns of aging among blacks, Hispanics, Indians, Appalachians, and Asians, and to identify and analyze social problems for the minority groups studied.

SOWK 3213 Human and Cultural Diversity Social Work: 3 semester hours.

Acquisition and application of methods, theories, and skills sensitive to a wide variety of human differences for competent social work practice with diverse populations. Effects of prejudice, discrimination, and stereotyping at individual and institutional levels. Advocacy for social and economic justice specific to race, ethnicity, gender, age, religion, disability, social class, nationality, and sexual orientation.

SOWK 4123 Social Work Practice I: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to generalist social work practice theory, knowledge, values, and skills in professional practice with individuals, families, and small groups. Emphasis on ecological and systems framework; presents generalist methodological approach for problem solving.

SOWK 4133 Social Work Practice II: 3 semester hours.

Acquisition and application of theories and practice approaches appropriate for professional generalist social work with groups, organizations, and community systems. Emphasizes leadership roles and skills, including analyses of systems processes and interactions. Builds on problem solving approach introduced in SOWK 4123. Thirty-six (36) hours of agency volunteer service required.
Prerequisites: SOWK 4123.

SOWK 4143 Social Work Research I: 3 semester hours.

Study of the research process and its application to generalist social work practice. Conceptual foundation of social work research. Quantitative and qualitative methods of inquiry, research designs, data collection, and analysis of ethical and human diversity issues in research. Introduces computer research applications in social work practice.

SOWK 4153 Social Work Research II: 3 semester hours.

Advanced quantitative and qualitative methods of inquiry, research designs, and analysis of ethical and human diversity issues in social work research. Knowledge and skills in using advanced computer research applications in social work.
Prerequisites: SOWK 4143.

SOWK 4163 Honors Seminar in Social Work: 3 semester hours.

Special seminar of current events in social welfare.

SOWK 4176 Field Practicum: 6 semester hours.

Supervised learning experience involving field-based placement in social service agency. Integration of theory and practice. All required social work foundation courses must be completed before entering practicum.
Co-requisite: SOWK 4183.

SOWK 4183 Integrative Seminar: 3 semester hours.

Analysis and evaluation of the field-based experiences. Evaluation of conceptual framework for integrating social work knowledge, skills, and values gained from field experiences including administrative issues related to practicum, agency assignments and other field related issues for resolution. All required social work foundation courses must be completed before enrolling in this course.
Co-requisite: SOWK 4176.

SOWK 4343 Generalist Crisis Intervention: 3 semester hours.

Intervention with individuals, families, and communities in crisis using the generalist social work model. Crisis assessment, management and referral.

SOWK 4353 Intervention with Addicted Family: 3 semester hours.

Integration of theory and codependency, mental and physical abuse, and other obsessive behaviors.

SOWK 4363 Special topics in Social Work: 3 semester hours.

Select topics of interest in the field of social work and social welfare. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

SOWK 4993 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research, and/or field work on selected topics.

Sociology Courses

SOCG 1013 General Sociology: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the discipline. Focus on why and how sociologists study social and cultural phenomena such as inequality, race and ethnicity, gender, populations, family, political behavior, deviance, and social change.

SOCG 2003 Sociology of Minorities: 3 semester hours.

Sociological study of traditional minorities (race, ethnicity, and religion) and new minorities (gender, sexual orientation and disability).

SOCG 2013 Sociology of Families: 3 semester hours.

Study of families as social institutions. Focus on social facts and theories of the size, composition, and life cycle of families, family violence, family diversity, family change, and myths about the family.

SOCG 2023 African Family and Culture: 3 semester hours.

Exploration of the institution of family from perspective of African peoples, cultures, and societies; explores issues of the Diaspora.

SOCG 2033 Social Psychology: 3 semester hours.

Uses major social psychological perspectives to analyze human behavior and the importance of others in determining self-perception, attitudes, motivation, conformity, communication, altruism, and aggression.

SOCG 2043 Social Problems: 3 semester hours.

Application of sociological principles to major social issues and problems in contemporary and global society with particular emphasis on the United States.

SOCG 2053 Social Deviance: 3 semester hours.

Analyzes norm violation and social conformity, societal sanctions and social control. Examines the changing definitions of deviance and theoretical explanations of deviant behaviors deviant in different societies.

SOCG 3013 Urban Sociology: 3 semester hours.

Study of human settlement patterns, including the origin and development of cities, types of cities, urban political economy, spatial distribution of lifestyles, urban problems and recent trends in urbanization. Examines globalization and the rise of mega-cities and homelessness.

SOCG 3023 Correctional Treatment and Public Policy: 3 semester hours.

Sociological analysis of the historical development and current policies of the correctional system. Analysis of the justice process from crime to conviction: correctional systems (including jails), detention facilities to include local, state, federal and private penal systems.

SOCG 3033 Social Stratification in America: 3 semester hours.

A consideration of the research findings describing the American class structure. Special attention is given to the various strata, the determinants of membership in these strata, lifestyles and life changes associated with social position and with changes in position.

SOCG 3043 Juvenile Delinquency: 3 semester hours.

Sociological approaches to the nature and extent of juvenile delinquency; historical reasons for considering juvenile delinquency from adult crime perspective; influence of environments that support delinquency such as subcultures, peer groups, and gangs. Examines current societal measures used to address juvenile delinquency.

SOCG 3053 Addiction and Substance Abuse: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed to examine the sources of drug abuse; review and assess the biological, psychological and social forces as causal factors of addiction.

SOCG 3063 Sociology of Drug Use and Abuse: 3 semester hours.

Historical and contemporary analysis of patterns of use and abuse of legal and non-legal drugs in the U.S. and other parts of the world. Social-psychological impact of abuse, dependence, and addiction. Evaluation of consequences and treatment.

SOCG 3073 Sociology of Drug Enforcement: 3 semester hours.

Study of current and historical agencies and policies used in drug enforcement. Emphasizing the roles of drug enforcement officials in the prevention and control of drugs in society.

SOCG 3083 Sociology of Probation and Parole: 3 semester hours.

Examines the organization and administration of probation and parole services, including pre-sentence investigation, probation hearings, conditions of probation, and community supervision. Examines parole administration, including operation of Parole Boards, the selection process for parole, boot camp, shock incarceration and emerging issues in probation and parole.

SOCG 3223 Political Sociology: 3 semester hours.

Comparative analysis of political development and political participation including voting behavior, public opinion, political parties and elites; political power and resource distribution in groups, organizations, institutions, communities, and societies.

SOCG 3993 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research, and/or field work on selected topics.

SOCG 4023 Special Topics in Sociology: 3 semester hours.

Intensive study of specialized topics in sociology and contemporary social issues. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

SOCG 4043 Collective Behavior and Social Change: 3 semester hours.

Examines the spontaneous behavior of impermanent, unstructured collections of people, including crowds, disaster, revolutions and social movements.

SOCG 4053 Social Statistics: 3 semester hours.

Presentation of sociological data and introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics for social science majors. Includes computer applications.
Prerequisites: MATH 1113.

SOCG 4063 Demography: 3 semester hours.

Study of size, composition, growth and distribution of populations; social causes and consequences of population change; and collection and interpretation of vital statistics and census data.

SOCG 4073 Global Sociology: 3 semester hours.

Study of the interaction of culture, technology and environment in the evolution of social life from hunting and gathering bands to global society. Explores recent theories of global society in the post-cold war world.

SOCG 4143 Environmental Sociology: 3 semester hours.

Explores human relationship with the physical world, other animals, and with the land including raw materials. A broad historical and cultural perspective will be employed, comparative cultural analyses, changes over time in relation to progress, and current environmental problems and possible solutions.

SOCG 4633 Cultural Sociology: 3 semester hours.

Study of culture including cultural universals, cultural conflicts, and cultural pluralism from a global perspective. Explores the effect of technology on cultural transmission and cultural change.

SOCG 4723 Sociological Research Methods: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to methods of sociological research including experiments, survey research, secondary analysis, and observation. Includes computer applications.

SOCG 4733 Sociological Theory: 3 semester hours.

Critical survey of major sociological theories from classical to contemporary schools of thought.

SOCG 4763 Sociology Internship: 3 semester hours.

Placement in governmental agency, nonprofit organization or business for supervised experience in applied sociology. May require health examination or security clearance.

SOCG 4783 Senior Seminar in Sociology: 3 semester hours.

Final integration of the major works of theory and research in sociology including subfields. Comprehensive exam and major paper required. Restricted to majors and must be taken the semester prior to graduation.

SOCG 4993 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research, and/or field work on selected topics.

SOCG 5123 Social Statistics: 3 semester hours.

This course is designed to enhance students' statistical knowledge of measurement of central tendency, z-test, t-tests, and analysis of variance, correlation techniques and regression analysis.

SOCG 5213 Classical Sociological Theory: 3 semester hours.

Major sociological contributions of the classical theorists including but not limited to Thomas Hobbes, Auguste Comte, Alexis de Tocqueville, Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, Harriet Martineau, W.E.B. DuBois, and Jane Addams, providing the foundation for contemporary theory.

SOCG 5223 Research Methods: 3 semester hours.

Advanced instruction in sociological research requiring a detailed treatment of qualitative and quantitative techniques of data collection and analysis. Written paper based on original research required.

SOCG 5243 Urban Sociology: 3 semester hours.

Examines the social structure of cities and the adjustment people make to urban conditions. Urban neighborhoods, population groupings, social processes, trends and problems are treated in the light of historical, ecological and social factors. A review of selected problems including urban tensions and the persistence of local ties such as family and ethnicity are explored.

SOCG 5263 Sociology of Education: 3 semester hours.

Exploration of knowledge in society and its relationship to the social structure and individual consciousness; how the social attributes of groups as well as individuals affect the production, ordering, and presentation of information as well as the form knowledge takes in a particular society.

SOCG 5283 Aspects Of Poverty: 3 semester hours.

Presentation of several theoretical perspectives on poverty in American society. Past, current, and proposed solutions of poverty are discussed.

SOCG 5333 Criminology: 3 semester hours.

A survey of the historical and contemporary explanations of phenomena of crime and criminal behavior from the perspective of contemporary theories and the analysis of evidence supportive of various theoretical positions. Crime measurement and crime statistics are also discussed, as are the techniques for crime analysis.

SOCG 5353 Seminar in Race Relations: 3 semester hours.

Wide range exploration of the dynamics of inter-group relations including historical and sociological factors in race and ethnic relations. An examination of politico-economic and societal development processes that serve to maintain social positions in contemporary society.

SOCG 5413 Contemporary Sociological Theory: 3 semester hours.

Basic ideas of contemporary sociological theory: structuralism, functionalism, conflict, symbolic interaction, exchange; includes but not limited to the works of Parsons, Merton, Mead, Cooley, Goffinan, Coser, Dahrendorf, Marcuse and Habermas and their application to current research.
Prerequisites: SOCG 5213.

SOCG 5423 Social Stratification: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of the nature of social stratification and its relation to other aspects of society: distribution of influence and wealth occupational structural, family relations, religious and educational institutions, minority problems, and cultural patterns. Comparison between open class, caste and other arrangements. Sources of mobility and change in stratification systems. Also addresses the impact of different forms of ranking and the consequent inequalities that arise.

SOCG 5433 Theory of Criminal Justice System: 3 semester hours.

Theoretical analysis of crime and criminal justice systems including the police, courts and prisons that deal with people who are accused of having committed crimes. Theories of crime commission include: Differential Association Theory, Control Theory, Labeling Theory, Strain Theory, and Illegitimate Opportunity Theory among others.

SOCG 5443 Social Movements: 3 semester hours.

Examination of theories and research on social movement and social change; historical and contemporary social movements in the United States and elsewhere; collective violence and protest; terrorism and social and political revolutions.

SOCG 5453 Complex Organizations: 3 semester hours.

Introduces students to the critical examination of modern organizations, the nature of bureaucracy and its effect on personality, social relations, group dynamics and social change. Examines bureaucratic arrangements and processes in a variety of organizational context such as corporations, universities, unions, professionals associations, government bureaus and religious institutions. The role of power in bureaucratic settings and exchanges is explored.

SOCG 5463 Special Topics: 3 semester hours.

Seminar on specialized topics in sociology. Subject matter may vary by semester. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

SOCG 5553 Sociology of Gender and Sex Roles: 3 semester hours.

Analyzes the social significance of gender. Explores the theoretical assumptions that under gird the nature of women's oppression sex-class-race cleavage, plus inequalities between women and men. A cross-cultural analysis of the development of gender roles and an examination of contemporary gender inequality in terms of gender work patterns, labor force participation, and occupational mobility as well as alternatives to conventional division of labor by sex in society.

SOCG 5613 Thesis: 3 semester hours.

A candidate for the Master of Sociology is required to prepare a thesis under the direction of a faculty thesis committee. The thesis must be orally defended and approved by all members of the faculty thesis committee before the degree is conferred. The student must register for thesis each semester until satisfactorily completed.

SOCG 5623 Thesis: 3 semester hours.

A candidate for the Master of Sociology is required to prepare a thesis under the direction of a faculty thesis committee. The thesis must be orally defended and approved by all members of the faculty thesis committee before the degree is conferred. The student must register for thesis each semester until satisfactorily completed.
Prerequisites: SOCG 5613.

SOCG 5993 Independent Study: 3 semester hours.

Readings, research, and/or field work on selected topics.